Why is Mac more convenient than Windows?

vmflapem

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Dec 27, 2013
424
67
I've heard so many people say that Mac is more convenient once you get used to it.

Is there some specific features that make Macs more convenient than Windows?
 

yjchua95

macrumors 604
Apr 23, 2011
6,725
231
GVA, KUL, MEL (current), ZQN
I've heard so many people say that Mac is more convenient once you get used to it.

Is there some specific features that make Macs more convenient than Windows?
Multiple desktops (Mission Control)
Installing apps is (most of the time) as easy as copying the app from the installer disk image into the Applications folder. Uninstalling is (usually) as easy as just dragging the app into the Trash, no clunky uninstallation wizards.
No BSODs, largely (but not completely) virus-free.
Stable UNIX kernel.
Easy disk management with Disk Utility.
Perfect integration with iCloud.
Free software (iWork and iLife).
 

petvas

macrumors 601
Jul 20, 2006
4,686
742
Mannheim, Germany
Don't think features, think overall user experience and integration.
When you go Mac, you get an integrated computing experience, where hardware & software works perfectly together (most of the times :) )
OS X is very stable, but so is Windows (at least 7 & 8).
Usability-wise there are some things in OS X that Windows still doesn't have that make it a better choice:
  • Apps don't slow down the OS
  • No viruses
  • The use of mouse gestures (or trackpad) to use Mission Control
  • The hot corners work better than in Windows 8 and are fully customizable
  • No open Windows clutter. Mission Control and Exposé take care of the mess you can make
  • Everything works together and all 1st party apps have a great design, much more pleasing than the one found in Windows.
  • iLife is still better than Windows software
 
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simon48

macrumors 65816
Sep 1, 2010
1,315
88
I agree with the other posters, especially iPhoto, it's so much better then any thing you can get foe Windows. Another big one, setting up a printers, as they say, "it just works".
 

dusk007

macrumors 68040
Dec 5, 2009
3,386
62
Now it is. It used to cost something but never as much a office. The Word, Excel equivalents aren't quite as good and very often interoperability with Microsoft Office because of work or study is a problem.
Microsoft probably wouldn't have been allowed to bundle that much software with their OS because of market share. They do have Windows Life which covers some of the non Office areas and Mail.

iWorks is I think even free if you buy an older used Mac. As long as you can get into the AppStore (since OSX 10.6.8) you should just be able to download it for free.
 

yjchua95

macrumors 604
Apr 23, 2011
6,725
231
GVA, KUL, MEL (current), ZQN
Is that free when youre buying new laptop?
Yes.

----------

Now it is. It used to cost something but never as much a office. The Word, Excel equivalents aren't quite as good and very often interoperability with Microsoft Office because of work or study is a problem.
Microsoft probably wouldn't have been allowed to bundle that much software with their OS because of market share. They do have Windows Life which covers some of the non Office areas and Mail.

iWorks is I think even free if you buy an older used Mac. As long as you can get into the AppStore (since OSX 10.6.8) you should just be able to download it for free.
Nope. Older macs still have to pay for it.
 

priitv8

macrumors 68040
Jan 13, 2011
3,631
476
Estonia
OS X also does not contain this mess Windows has: the Registry!

But as was said earlier, the main point is the tight integration and controlled hardware. The number of different HW configurations is finite, well known to Apple and nowhere near as large as in PC world. Thus, the number of hardware drivers is under control and if something's not right, you usually know whose fault it is.
 

maflynn

Moderator
Staff member
May 3, 2009
66,690
33,576
Boston
Generally speaking the marriage of the hardware and software. Apple has the ability to control the hardware and software design which gives it an advantage.

Another advantage is OSX is based on Unix, a time proven rock solid operating system.

Windows has matured and with win7, MS has done a great job, its stable, fast and is visually appealing. At this point, my opinion is either OS is up to the task and its now more of a personal preference.

Both have their set of advantages and disadvantages.
 

maflynn

Moderator
Staff member
May 3, 2009
66,690
33,576
Boston
It still does harm to the user :)
No question but the big difference AFAIK, is that its more of a self inflicted wound. That is without antivirus software for windows, its difficult to avoid infection. With a trojan on OSX you generally have to install an app that prompts for your admin credentials. There are some exceptions but for the most part you have to be an active participant in the process.

The end result thought is something bad happening :(
 

maflynn

Moderator
Staff member
May 3, 2009
66,690
33,576
Boston
How does one submit an updated program or source code back to apple? I'm not disagreeing with you but I through with Apple, its a one way direction. With the open source they let you use it, but they don't incorporate any changes.
 

priitv8

macrumors 68040
Jan 13, 2011
3,631
476
Estonia
How does one submit an updated program or source code back to apple? I'm not disagreeing with you but I through with Apple, its a one way direction. With the open source they let you use it, but they don't incorporate any changes.
i think the one possible way is to report bugs via their Radar (bug reporting) system.
You may be correct in stating that one can't provide one's own piece of code. But one can investigate theirs and draw their attention to deficiencies found.
 
Last edited:

Daniele Mnn

macrumors newbie
Jan 2, 2014
22
3
As recent switcher from Windows, I think the Finder is underpowered compared to windows explorer, for example you can't pause a file transfer.
Another thing I don't understand why it's not possible in OS X is cicle through options in a pop-up window, for example when you delete a podcast in iTunes and the program asks to keep or delete the file.

However the stability of OS X is better compared to Windows, the apps look and feel better (I hate the Metro interface in W8).
Mostly I'm just amazed how much can I do with mission control and the different spaces, when I have a dozen of open windows I can move through them easily and fast. Also quick look is amazing.
 

Gav Mack

macrumors 68020
Jun 15, 2008
2,192
17
Sagittarius A*
OSX since 10.4 has had this nice feeling of all the apps doing all the basics well and integrated together, and since 1990 with Windows Microsoft's GUI was always well behind the standard set by Apple.

I was one of the few over the moon when Apple went Intel, and bootcamp was great however it just still showed how far they were still behind with XP. Vista was two steps forward one back, had terrible performance issues, bugs and glitches but under the hood it showed a lot of potential. Mac users of OSX 10.1-2 that might sound familiar.

Windows 7 however changed the game though, it's the first and still the only Microsoft OS comparable to OSX. I have had none of the stability problems on Windows 7 on any of my systems, but I don't install adware, crapware, toolbars, search hijackers and keep all my plug ins up to date vigilantly.

I can understand any Win 8 users relieved to be using OSX, though I support it I wouldn't dream of using it myself aside from on the test rig I have. 7 really didn't need replacing as like Vista lots of 8 was not very well thought out with the metro stupidity, confusing a desktop OS with a tablet and menus options spread stupidly all over the shop, though like Vista underneath there was much to find good in. 8.1 was an improvement, half way but still not enough. From what I hear it will be 8.2 that will give a desktop OS back that succeeds 7 as a worthy competitor, though in my case I feels it's more complimentary to a Mac.

They both do different things good and have their own strengths and weaknesses and I couldn't do without either of them!
 

mitasol

macrumors newbie
Dec 6, 2013
14
0
I can understand any Win 8 users relieved to be using OSX, though I support it I wouldn't dream of using it myself aside from on the test rig I have. 7 really didn't need replacing as like Vista lots of 8 was not very well thought out with the metro stupidity, confusing a desktop OS with a tablet and menus options spread stupidly all over the shop, though like Vista underneath there was much to find good in. 8.1 was an improvement, half way but still not enough. From what I hear it will be 8.2 that will give a desktop OS back that succeeds 7 as a worthy competitor, though in my case I feels it's more complimentary to a Mac.

They both do different things good and have their own strengths and weaknesses and I couldn't do without either of them!

Yes Windows 8 tipped me over the edge to OSX - tested it for almost 12 months in various incarnations and even if I didn't have to pay for it (technet subscription) it wasn't worth it. Moved to an rMBP about a month ago and haven't looked back.
 

simonsi

macrumors 601
Jan 3, 2014
4,850
734
Auckland
I run OSX only in an enterprise environment, accessing Outlook, using the Mac Office 2011.

There is simply nothing I need windoze for. These days it is a genuine choice. FYI I work in a technical management role for a telco.

I'm sure there are many more technical roles for which windoze is a technical requirement driven by vendor software etc but I find no need whatsoever.
 

Daysight

macrumors regular
Dec 15, 2011
192
1
As above plus sublimely easy integration/communication between my iMac, iPhone, iPad, wifi and entertainment system, and my family members' Apple devices.
 
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