Why is the Blackberry still better than the iPhone?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by Stang68, Aug 1, 2008.

  1. Stang68 macrumors 6502a

    Stang68

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    Wirelessly posted (Opera/9.50 (J2ME/MIDP; Opera Mini/4.1.11328/546; U; en))

    Hey everyone,

    So people keep saying that the iPhone is not better than the Blackberry Bold because it'll never match Blackberry's ability to do email. Now, why is that? I thought the iPhone has push email now. What's the deal?

    Thanks
     
  2. seenett macrumors regular

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    For starters, the iPhone has push email for Mobile Me only. BlackBerry pushes ALL email.
     
  3. apockalipse macrumors member

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    Nobody has had hands on experience with the Bold yet, so take comparisons with a grain of salt.
     
  4. profetto macrumors regular

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    Blackberry was never better than the iPhone, whoever your source is must be on crack.
     
  5. Stang68 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Stang68

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    Ok, then I mean ANY Blackberry. People say the are STILL better? Why?!
     
  6. apockalipse macrumors member

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    Not completely accurate. 2.0 has exchange support which does push. Don't buy everything that Apple and Jobs try to sell you.


    As an owner of both, this is my opinion that I posted in another forum:

    I have had a blackberry for years and currently have both. For business use (mostly email/exchange server and texting) its tough to beat the blackberry. For everything else, iphone kicks the bb's butt! Browsing is far superior. Games are far superior. Multimedia is far superior. The iphone is just plain more fun. I'm not a huge text messager and now that the iphone has exchange support, I would definitely recommend it over bb (with the current bb lineup) if I had to choose. The only thing with exchange for iphone is that you have to be willing to use it for business and personal because personal calendar/contacts will be overwritten once you add exchange support.
     
  7. Opie macrumors 6502a

    Opie

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    iphone fits great in your pocket and you dont have to wear those douche cases on your hip like with blackberry.
     
  8. ivtecDOu macrumors 6502

    ivtecDOu

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    lol i borrowed friends blackberry and i ummm..... i wasnt amused needless to say we switched back :D
     
  9. seenett macrumors regular

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    Let me rephrase: The iPhone has had the ability to push SOME email since 2.0 was released less than a month ago. Blackberry has had the ability to push ALL email for many years. As such, it has been the gold standard with corporate users and tech people.
     
  10. apockalipse macrumors member

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    Completely agreed. I work at a large company in the top half of the fortune 500 and at this point they refuse to even consider the iphone as an alternative to the blackberries. Large, old companies are always slow to embrace change especially when technology is involved. I suspect that many similar large companies will take the same stance, which may be a hard obstacle for Apple to overcome in the near future. I'm curious to see how it plays out.
     
  11. Stang68 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Stang68

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    Yea, and with the Bold coming out, I don't think many comapnies are going to plan on changing. The iPhone does, though, have the definite edge on the multimedia side of things. RIM says the Bold will be good at that, but the iPhone is the clear winner in that aspect
     
  12. f1 macrumors 6502

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    In terms of email, the Blackberry is the only phone that is able to PUSH email from ANY email provider. However in order to do that, RIM must maintain their own servers that check your email constantly and push the email to your Blackberry, and this comes at a premium. On average a Blackberry plan does usually cost more than an iPhone plan.
     
  13. apockalipse macrumors member

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    I'm sure the Bold will be a very cool device, and hopefully my company provides me with one, but the screen is so small compared to the iphone that I just have a hard time thinking that it will provide the same satisfying mobile experience that the iphone does.
     
  14. ubersalad macrumors 6502a

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    I think that has more to do with these old dinosaur IT people and the way things work in big corporation. You don't just change things, you have to slowly change people's mind, and these dinosaurs are some stubborn son of b*tch.
     
  15. SlamMan macrumors newbie

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    I like the iPhone 3G a lot. The multimedia is 2nd to none. Blackberry still takes it's lunch money when it comes to email though. I can't stand having to check each email account separately. I really miss multiple ring profiles and different notifications for different email addresses. iPhone seems to be missing a couple of the most simple features.

    Since you do email a lot more in business than watch YouTube and chat on AIM the BB makes more sense for business users.
     
  16. jecapaga macrumors 601

    jecapaga

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    Actually the original iphone has always been able to push email as long as it was your yahoo account. Granted, Yahoo mail push has always been sketchy, even to this day.

    That doesn't do anything for business users though. Now it can push Exchange for business users, MobileMe and Yahoo. The line between Blackberry and the iPhone is getting thinner. Old school IT people will have something to say about whether they welcome the new iPhone into their business IT model unfortunately.
     
  17. ubersalad macrumors 6502a

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    Uhh...Push is a new addition to 2.0...it wasn't pushing.
     
  18. apockalipse macrumors member

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    What it really comes down to is that corporate American has become such a "cover your ass" environment that too many people are afraid to voice their opinion and stand up for their original ideas (if they differ from the status quo) due to fear. Its pretty much silly if you take a step back and look at it. No matter how many cliches you hear out "caring for our employees" or offering "top notch service to our clients" in the end nothing else matters but "making your numbers" and generating revenue. Few people in the corporate world ever step up and say, "let's try something new." The rare ones that do usually find success and they are the ones you hear about.
     
  19. jecapaga macrumors 601

    jecapaga

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    Clarify exactly what wasn't pushing prior to 2.0?
     
  20. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    Although the effect is often the same, the Push methods are totally different:

    PUSH on the iPhone (and WinMo) is really a Pull with a long timeout. We've been over this endlessly the past couple of weeks. The phone must send a TCP/IP request every once in a while to keep the connection alive, so the server has a path over which to send a notification reply. If there are short network timeouts, more battery is used.

    PUSH on the Blackberry is true Push. No request/response. That is, it does not have to continuously ping the server in order to maintain a connection / IP address. The carrier specific RIM Network Operating Center maintains a device-IP table and sends a UDP packet to the phone as notification. Thus it uses far less battery and is not affected by network timeouts along the way.

    Patents, for which RIM paid dearly, protect the latter kind of push.
     
  21. ubersalad macrumors 6502a

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    There wasn't ANY "push" until 2.0.
     
  22. apockalipse macrumors member

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    Excellent explanation of the differences. In the simplest terms blackberries are sent a signal from the server when you have a new message. The iphone needs to actively check for new messages by pinging the server. Therefore the iphone has to frequently send out a signal to check for new messages whether you have any new messages or not. Blackberries simply wait for the server to tell them that they have new messages and therefore save a lot of power in the meantime. I would say for almost all personal use and most business use, the iphone method is acceptable, but if you really need your emails instantly, you need a blackberry.
     
  23. ubersalad macrumors 6502a

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    Actually, they're both about the same. Difference is on battery life, not how fast you receive the email.
     
  24. apockalipse macrumors member

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    Wrong. There is a significant delay in getting email on iphone compared to a blackberry. My blackberry often gets emails in before my desktop. Never does the iphone get them before the desktop.
     
  25. ubersalad macrumors 6502a

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    That's matter of routing emails I believe, perhaps someone with knowledge of how BB server works can explain.

    As far as I know, BB has its own server and routes directly from their own server, hence your Exchange Server won't get email before BB server. Also, I don't know much about how Exchange server works. So if Exchange server is retrieving as well, whereas Blackberry server is pushing, then Blackberry would get the email before Exchange.

    Perhaps if Apple has their own server and route everything through their server first, it'll probably get the email before Exchange as well.
     

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