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The iPhone 13 is widely expected to come with Wi-Fi 6E capabilities, and while it may seem rather nuanced to the average consumer, with only improved speeds and being "up to date" in the realm of Wi-Fi technology, it's actually a fairly significant improvement, laying the groundwork for much of what we know the future holds.

iPhone-13-Wi-Fi-6E-feature-update.jpg

To truly understand Wi-Fi 6E, MacRumors sat down for an exclusive interview with Kevin Robinson, senior vice president of marketing for the Wi-Fi Alliance, to discuss the new generation of Wi-Fi, Wi-Fi's relationship with 5G, and what new experiences it will enable. The Wi-Fi Alliance is a group few have probably heard of, but as Kevin describes it, it's a crucial part of the Wi-Fi puzzle, consisting of a "who's who" in the connectivity space.
All of these companies come together with this common vision of connecting everyone in everything, everywhere. As I said, it really is the who's who in the connectivity space. And it includes everyone on the beat, from the core technology developers such as Qualcomm, Broadcom, Intel, etc. to the end product vendors such as Apple, Microsoft, Samsung, LG, and even service providers like Comcast, Charter, British Telecom, all find a home in Wi-Fi Alliance.
Wi-Fi is a technology that's present in the majority of technology products consumers buy and is one of the very few technologies itself that's universal. That universality means that all Wi-Fi devices must work together, even if from another brand or purchased in a completely different part of the world. That's where the Wi-Fi Alliance comes in with a program it calls Wi-Fi Certified. This program certifies devices for use with Wi-Fi, ensuring interoperability. In simpler words, the next time you go shopping for a router or other Wi-Fi-centric device and see a "Wi-Fi Certified" label, thank the Wi-Fi Alliance.

Traditionally, the name of every new release of a device, product, or technology includes a sequential increase in number, with the highest number being the latest and greatest. With Wi-Fi, that's only recently been the case. Before "Wi-Fi 6," Wi-Fi technologies were given names like 802.11b, n, or ax. The change to a sequential naming structure, according to Kevin, all boils down to making it easier for consumers to make the right decisions for their Wi-Fi needs.
Coming up with a generational naming approach was very critical in that it's very accessible and understandable to the average person who needs to know what is the latest Wi-Fi and for the industry to communicate what are the benefits associated with any given generation of Wi-Fi. There are characteristics, I think, that go along with each generation, and by having a very simple name, people are more likely to be able to associate those benefits with a given generation and ultimately make the best decision for them.
Knowing that, Wi-Fi 6 is still a fairly new technology. Released in 2019, it promises to offer users a more consistent, robust, and reliable Wi-Fi experience that works across a range of devices. Wi-Fi 6E, which on the surface is simply Wi-Fi 6 expanded into the 6-GHz range, was announced more recently in January of 2020.

Wi-Fi 6E builds on Wi-Fi 6, which includes a flexible approach to consumer Wi-Fi needs that ensures every device in a home, whether a smart TV streaming 4K content from Netflix or a small HomeKit-enabled sensor, gets the Wi-Fi performance that's right for that specific device.
Wi-Fi 6 is more deterministic, meaning you're getting a more consistent experience that works really well in dense environments. Because it's more efficient, it works well with multiple types of devices, all accessing the network at the same time and providing the level of service those devices need.

The biggest things are going to be high performance with multi-gigabit speeds that allow you to do things like stream high definition video, UHD video, mail with large file transfers, things like that. It delivers extremely low latency, which is something that's critical for gaming, where whether or not you have low latency determines whether it's maybe you losing the game or somebody else losing the game. But also critical for things like voice communications or VR where latency really feeds into the user experience and how you perceive VR.
Over the past year, Wi-Fi has skyrocketed in importance, with billions of people using it to live, work, and learn during the global health crisis. That increased reliance presented a challenge to Wi-Fi capacity, especially in densely populated areas. Wi-Fi 6E is designed specifically for this, where, thanks to the expansion into the 6-GHz range, the capacity of networks and routers has increased, along with performance.
Those additional benefits are an incredible increase in capacity. At a very high level, you have significantly more spectrum to operate with thanks to Wi-Fi 6E. You're going from one to maybe two 160 megahertz channels, and these are ultra-wide channels that allow very, very high performance. You get one or two of those in the five gigahertz band, depending on where you are. And you get up to seven of these super-wide channels in the 6-GHz band. It's critical when you're in, let's say, multi-dwelling units. Think of New York, Chicago and with high rise buildings around the planet; think of stadiums; that's where it becomes essential to have that additional capacity.
The bedrock of Wi-Fi 6E's creation is the realization that under previous technologies, there would not have been enough capacity for users. This similar realization is also a reason behind the rapid adoption of 5G, specifically 5G mmWave, which aims to deliver high performance in densely populated areas.
We were simply approaching a scenario where there would not have been enough spectrum and capacity for people to do everything they wanted to do, and what we envision happening over Wi-Fi. You would have been contending with your neighbor's network; even in a suburban setting, I see three, four, or five networks around me. Now, you take that into a dense city area and it becomes a much bigger problem. So it was essential for maintaining the experience over the long term of what you're gonna get from Wi-Fi 6E.
Even with the increased reliance on Wi-Fi, the significant jump in capacity presented by Wi-Fi 6E seems, to the average consumer, almost overkill. I asked Kevin why, let's say, a family of four would need to take advantage of Wi-Fi 6E when it may be excessive for their needs.
I think what often gets overlooked is that as people are in increasingly dense environments, even suburbia, you have smaller land plots between single-family homes, and as people are increasingly moving into more urbanized areas, it's not just about the performance, let's say, that your family of four needs. But also because you are sharing [Wi-Fi] on this unlicensed spectrum with those that are around you. By adding this additional spectrum of Wi-Fi 6E, it means that, if I'm in an apartment complex, I have people on all four sides of me, and I have similar people above and below me kind of on all four sides, all using a shared resource. So again, it's important to understand that you still benefit by having more spectrum capacity and that you are going to get the performance that the technology can support without contending as much with those around you.
The technologies inside of routers and supported products only write half the story, the other half comes from internet service providers. I asked Kevin where ISPs fall into this grander scheme of our Wi-Fi world. Specifically, why should users invest in Wi-Fi 6E compatible devices if their ISPs cannot take advantage of them?

Kevin tells me that ISPs play a "very active" role in the Wi-Fi Alliance and that service providers who are on the "leading edge" wanting to deliver the best possible experience for their customers will take advantage of Wi-Fi 6E and all it has to offer.

I ended our conversation with a rounded question about the thinking behind Wi-Fi as a whole. Current measurement metrics for an average user include whether a TV show buffers or how long it takes to download a movie. My curiosity resides in where that mentality will be in 10 to 15 years; what arbitrary unit of measurement will we use to classify Wi-Fi speeds in the future?

The answer is that many things will be the same; content streaming and so forth will stay around. However, Kevin's main point is that consumers won't be as concerned over speeds as they're concerned over experiences, specifically virtual reality. Kevin believes that we're heading towards a future where Wi-Fi plays a more integral role in the immersion of VR experiences, rather than a focus on purely offering users high-speeds.
"Oh, well, that I [downloaded] all my contents and all my files in a matter of seconds stuff. That's amazing, right?" But then it's also going to be in experiences that are not so much like, "Oh, this happened in a few seconds," but rather, this VR experience is completely immersive; it is as close to reality as I can imagine, it's responsive, even though the person I'm interacting with is on the other end of the country, or, I'm using a game and I again, just cannot distinguish it from reality. And all of those experiences are going to rely on very high-performance Wi-Fi.
To me, Wi-Fi 6E is fundamental long-term in two ways. More and more people are using smart home devices, and in the Apple world, HomeKit-enabled devices. In a bubble, a single home has smart home products with laptops, smartphones, and more. Wi-Fi 6, and more so Wi-Fi 6E, is future-proofing Wi-Fi for a wide range of current and future devices.

Secondly, Wi-Fi 6E and how it plays a role in VR and AR seems to be one of the clearest reasons Apple could bring it to the iPhone 13 later this fall. Apple builds on technologies it places into its products, and as the company continues its development on "Apple Glasses," the inclusion of Wi-Fi 6E and all of the benefits of high-speed, optimized, high-load Wi-Fi seems like a clear step in enabling future VR/AR experiences.

Article Link: Wi-Fi 6E Explained: What It Could Mean for iPhone 13 and Beyond
 
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iapplelove

macrumors 603
Nov 22, 2011
5,317
7,612
East Coast USA
Only reason I’m even upgrading this year is because my iPhone X has a smashed screen. If I’m gonna spend around 200 plus to fix a 4 year old phone I might as well finally upgrade and reap the benefits of the new features.
 
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jz0309

Contributor
Sep 25, 2018
3,537
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Temecula, CA
Next step I wifi, routers will be more expensive, will have 8 or 10 antennas and your broadband speed will stay the same…
Sure, when I need to replace my router, computers, phones, iPads, watch and all the other wifi enabled devices, I’ll take wifi 6E… until such time, I’m quite happy with what I got… YMMV
 
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reallynotnick

macrumors 65816
Oct 21, 2005
1,028
686
6E really will be a godsend for people who live in apartments. I remember when 5Ghz came out and I was one of the first to have it in my apartment and it was amazing.

The fact that 6Ghz requires all devices to be WiFi 6 means no concerns of less efficient protocols using the spectrum or causing interference, it also has slightly shorter range which is a win in apartments and just the sheer amount of spectrum available is a quantum leap in it of itself.
 
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Analog Kid

macrumors 603
Mar 4, 2003
6,025
5,264
Before "Wi-Fi 6," Wi-Fi technologies were given names like 802.11b, n, or ax. The change to a sequential naming structure, according to Kevin, all boils down to making it easier for consumers to make the right decisions for their Wi-Fi needs.

Now they’re given names like 6, or 6E… Much more clear. E is obviously the first letter in a naming sequence.
 
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HarryWild

macrumors 68000
Oct 27, 2012
1,961
668
At a minimum $499+ for a router, I'm not all too interested.
I have wi-fi 6 router and makes a super big difference in everything. I downgrade my wi-fi speed from 1bps to 200mps and save $60 a month. Everything is still smooth and fast in 4K streaming videos and 4K channel programming. No buffering even at this slow speed! Amazing!:)
 
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kjvmartin

macrumors regular
Oct 11, 2016
247
332
Detroit
Even in an apartment, I'm happy with Eero 6 Pro mesh. I can game on the 2nd node and it's very competitive in terms of latency and bandwidth speeds - this was my goal. I paid a good $500-$600 for this setup and feel like 6E will benefit me, even if I don't upgrade, because my neighbors may get it and free up the 5ghz bands I am using.
 
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Eorlas

macrumors 6502a
Feb 10, 2010
962
1,552
At a minimum $499+ for a router, I'm not all too interested.

it's the bleeding edge tech currently. only a couple flagship offerings available atm, perhaps by e/o this year or early next year there will be wider selection.

loving the performance i'm getting out of our 6e router, hadnt done an upgrade in 6 years or so.
 
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mannyvel

macrumors 6502a
Mar 16, 2019
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Hillsboro, OR
Now they’re given names like 6, or 6E… Much more clear. E is obviously the first letter in a naming sequence.
I was curious, so poked around. The "E" doesn't seem to stand for anything. It could be:

  • Evolution, like LTE (long-term evolution)
  • Enhanced. Blessed by marketing?
  • Extended. Too technical?
  • Extra. Too generic?
But it's funny that the e isn't defined anywhere, including the wifi alliance page.
 
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ArtOfWarfare

macrumors G3
Nov 26, 2007
9,275
5,415
this VR experience is completely immersive; it is as close to reality as I can imagine, it's responsive, even though the person I'm interacting with is on the other end of the country, or, I'm using a game and I again, just cannot distinguish it from reality.
We'll be needing some biological augmentation if we can't distinguish our VR from reality. We'll need to augment our eyes with higher resolution cameras. We'll need to augment our brains with additional compute so we can actually make sense of all the extra detail (really, this is already a bottleneck... our conscious minds never get so much of the info that our eyes are already sending.)
 
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fischersd

macrumors 603
Oct 23, 2014
5,021
1,652
Vancouver, BC, Canada
This is like everything else - when the tech first comes out, it's more expensive.

BUT - hopefully some of the manufacturers (as the 6E reference spec would have been available when the Wifi 6 WAP's were being designed) - hopefully some of them future-proofed their WAP's and made 6E available with a firmware update (yes, they would have had to engineer the additional 6GHz band and antennae into the WAP to support these features - but they also know that people don't refresh their home network equipment very often). Those that already upgraded to Wifi 6 are unlikely to run out and replace their kit just for the additional 6E channels.

(remember that Wifi 6 made a lot more high speed channels available on the 2.4GHz spectrum) - this would have solved a lot of the congestion many apartment dwellers were seeing.

These should shortly drop to the same price point as 6E comes available by all of the manufacturers - $200 per node.
 
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citysnaps

macrumors 604
Oct 10, 2011
7,937
13,844
San Francisco
You can get Ubiquiti/UniFi WiFi 6 access points for $99 (basic model) and $179 (more features). When they roll out 6E it will be about the same.

I went Ubiquiti a few years ago for APs, routers, and switches. Commercial grade, super robust, 100% reliable, and easy to manage. Best networking decision I made.
 
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spicynujac

macrumors regular
May 24, 2012
182
7
I care much more about range than I do speed (as I'm typing this from my back porch).

So far, nothing is better for my needs than 802.11n, which is the standard from 2009, providing speeds of up to 600Mbps (The rating of internet speed in bits is an absurd way for ISPs to market that is FAR, FAR past its due date... You must divide any given rate by 8 to determine what its actual speed in megabytes is).

(So really we are talking about 600/8 or 75 MBps speeds)

Anyway, if you are living in an apartment, you might need the 5Ghz or 6Ghz frequencies, but if you live in a suburban or rural home, then "N" is superior as its giving you all the speed you need at range up to double that of the 5Ghz (the lower frequencies have superior range and handle obstacles better and N is 2.4 Ghz).

If you are on a mobile device and need more than 75MBps, I frankly don't see how that's possible on a 5" screen, but the interference issue I think is the bigger benefit. Otherwise, I'm sticking with "N".
 
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