Will 5,1 be on the chopping block for the next macOS?

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by Demigod Mac, Sep 27, 2016.

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  1. Demigod Mac macrumors 6502a

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    #1
    4,1 isn't compatible with Sierra out of the box.

    Will 5,1 suffer the same fate next year? I'd think it likely were it not for the minor revision the 5,1 series received in 2012, nearly identical to the 2010 models. Or would Apple abandon the 2010 Mac Pro and support the 2012s?*

    * That said, is there a way to make a 2010 appear to be a 2012 to macOS?
     
  2. SoyCapitanSoyCapitan macrumors 68040

    SoyCapitanSoyCapitan

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  3. thats all folks macrumors 6502a

    thats all folks

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    #3
    the 2010 is exactly the same machine as the 2012. they are both 5,1s. the only change was a minor adjustment to the available CPUs and pricing. what caused that was Intel lowering prices on some parts.
     
  4. redheeler macrumors 603

    redheeler

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    #4
    It's highly unlikely the 2010 will be dropped before the 2012 as both are Mac Pro 5,1 and firmware identical, with the only way to tell them apart being the serial number. (Similarly, the Sierra installer is unable to distinguish between a flashed Early 2009 and genuine Mid 2010.) I'd also bet our 5,1 classic Mac Pros will get at least one more official MacOS update, and after they are dropped there will be workarounds to get it booting unsupported.
     
  5. jdasikainen macrumors 6502

    jdasikainen

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    #5
    yeah im with you guys theree i think that they will at least give us 2 or 3 more supported releases then there will be work arounds galore
     
  6. SoyCapitanSoyCapitan macrumors 68040

    SoyCapitanSoyCapitan

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    #6
    We saw this optimism word for word for the 4,1 the day before Sierra announcement. Next year the 2010-2012 models are 5-7 years old. Apple drops support for machines that old often even when they can run a modern OS fine.
     
  7. mw360 macrumors 65816

    mw360

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    #7
    I believe you can expect ten years of support for a Mac. For example my 2008 MBP didn't make the cut for Sierra, so it will get security updates for Yosemite this year, then I'll have to run El Cap next year for security updates, then it's game over in late 2018.

    In theory then, you should be good for OS updates for 10.12 and 10.13, and you'll get your last security update in 2020. If they treat it like a 2012 (and I suspect they wouldn't because that's who they are) then you'd get 10.14 and 10.15 and support until 2022.

    Maybe somebody else has better data on the ten year thing? Any that didn't last ten years? Or lasted longer?
     
  8. pastrychef macrumors 601

    pastrychef

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    #8
    I don't think anyone other than Apple can give you a definitive answer as to when a model will lose OS support. Whether or not the hardware will work doesn't seem to have any role in whether OS support is dropped. The fastest a Mac model lost OS support that I'm aware of was the 2008 MacBook which lost OS support after 4 years.
     
  9. jdasikainen macrumors 6502

    jdasikainen

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    #9
    yeah the 2008 macbook and macbook air only got up to 10.7.5 si tget dudb;t get much support. but at least theres solast at look how long we thunked the 1,1 pros to run latest oses i bet the 08 pro will maie it a while and the same fir the 4,1 and the 5,1 won't be as easy but hey at least you get the new os.
     
  10. pastrychef macrumors 601

    pastrychef

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    #10
    I'm talking about official OS support from Apple.
     
  11. frou, Sep 28, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2016

    frou macrumors regular

    frou

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    #11
    Apple made their own bed by giving the last cMP the "Mid 2012" designation.

    They didn't have to do that. So in official terms, it's not just a "Mid 2010" variant.

    2012 + 7 = 2019

    Screen Shot 2016-09-28 at 10.46.31.png

    It's the year designations that count. Apple won't refer to the "x,y" Model Identifiers for system requirements.
     
  12. flyinmac macrumors 68030

    flyinmac

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    #12
    Or... if they don't demonstrate continued interest in the Mac Pro series (as they still appear disinterested), it's possible that all Mac Pros will lose support. Much like Xserve was practically forgotten while it was still being sold. Then one day a small statement, and game over.

    Remember what replaced the Xserve? The Mac mini.

    Not much of a stretch to imagine Apple saying the iMac is the Mac Pro replacement. And adjusting the iPad to be the replacement for the current iMac segment.
     
  13. pastrychef macrumors 601

    pastrychef

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    #13
    What does this mean? 7 years of support? Where did you get that info?
     
  14. frou macrumors regular

    frou

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    #14
    Apple has a notion of "Vintage" products (5 or 6 years outdated) and "Obsolete" products (7+ years outdated)
     
  15. pastrychef macrumors 601

    pastrychef

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    #15
  16. frou macrumors regular

    frou

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    #16
    Not sure if the Vintage/Obsolete thing was codified at that time. Either way, Apple reserve the right to do whatever they want - but that's probably easier to get away with for low-end plastic stuff.
     
  17. pastrychef macrumors 601

    pastrychef

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    #17
    So, in other words, the "+ 7" thing means nothing.
     
  18. flyinmac macrumors 68030

    flyinmac

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    #18
    Exactly.

    Apple serves Apple's interest.
     
  19. frou macrumors regular

    frou

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    #19
    Well if you want to get glib, then you yourself are actually Apple as part of a grand equation single consciousness in the centre of the universe. So... let's make it so that the cMP gets indefinite support.
     
  20. bsbeamer macrumors 6502

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    #20
    recall someone mentioning that there are legal qualifications in certain states that require "X" amount of years for updates/support/compatibility after purchase... maybe someone can better quote them, but I recall 7 being tossed around previously because that was/is the California law, and therefore why they use the obsolete label.

    so Mac Pro 5,1 (mid-2012) purchased in late 2013 (while still being sold as new) would then require compatibility/support/updates until late 2020.
     
  21. pastrychef macrumors 601

    pastrychef

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    #21
    I think that's in regards to having parts to repair systems. As far as I know, companies are not required to provide OS upgrades. Think of all the Android phones that don't get upgrades to new versions of Android.
     
  22. redheeler macrumors 603

    redheeler

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    #22
    Also, some of the 2009 Macs dropped by Sierra were sold new into late 2010. That's 6 years of support, not 7.
     
  23. deconstruct60 macrumors 604

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    #23
    the polycarbonate Macbook was essentially comatose by late 2008 when replaced by the aluminum one. ( Apple keep around some for the edu market. )

    While technically the clock starts ticking when stop manufacturing, that MacBook was clearly replaced the same year it came out. [ Apple kept it around for non-mainstream customers needs. ]. That model was a dead-ender. It was clipped outside the normal timeline Apple uses, but anyone who didn't see that it was a "dead ender" had their hand deeply buried in the sand.

    By 2012 that whole Macbook line up was dead. Intel's GMA graphics tech was dead. Did the 4,1 have a 64-bit boot EFI ( have doubts because Apple targeted this as the deep discount Mac with "hand me down" design elements. ).

    In short, it was the "eco" model that was firmly based on older "Core Duo" ( not Core 2 Duo, 64-bit) baseline technology.
     
  24. ITguy2016 Suspended

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    May 25, 2016
    #24
    According to Everymac the 4,1 had 64-bit EFI. To my knowledge the only MacBook models which had the Core Due processors were the original models released mid-2006. The late 2006 models contained Core 2 Duo processors.
     
  25. pastrychef macrumors 601

    pastrychef

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    #25
    Yes, there was a Late 2008 MacBook that was aluminum. But they also released a white Late 2008 MacBook4,2 and then, in 2009, they released a white MacBook5,2. No new aluminum model was released in 2009.

    I don't know if the MacBook4,1 had 64 bit EFI.

    Apple started putting Core 2 Duos in to MacBooks beginning with MacBook2,1.
     

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