Will running or jogging destroy my knees?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Bubble99, Jan 21, 2017.

  1. Bubble99 macrumors 6502

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    #1
    Will running or jogging destroy my knees? I hear running or jogging will destroy your knees because of the hard pounding on the pavement?

    Unless you run or jog on say grass or sand.
     
  2. Spink10 macrumors 601

    Spink10

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    #2
    Yes running + hard surface will hurt your knees if you put major miles on them.
     
  3. mobilehaathi macrumors G3

    mobilehaathi

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    #3
    I hoist myself up with some rope and pulleys and do mostly air jogging.
     
  4. Zenithal macrumors 68040

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    #4
    Get good shoes fitted to your sole and run on trails or grass.
     
  5. CE3 macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    Running can also be good for your knees, just listen to your body and "dose" accordingly. When I ran regularly I never ran long distances (usually 2-4 miles..enough to get the benefits), and I would alternate it with days on the exercise bike, which is usually great therapy for the knees on off days (if you got a knee replacement, they would probably have you biking in rehabilitation). Adding some yoga/stretching routines also helps keep the joints healthy.
     
  6. Phil A. Moderator

    Phil A.

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    #6
    Running can damage your knees, but it's not automatic (My runs are probably 90% on pavements and my knees are fine :))

    Don't overdo it and make sure you've got good form to minimise the impact on your knees (over-striding is a common cause of knee injury). Also, listen to your body and if it's telling you to take a break for a few days to recover, then take a break to recover!

    Good shoes (changed regularly) are also essential
     
  7. T'hain Esh Kelch macrumors 601

    T'hain Esh Kelch

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    #7
    Biking or swimming is much better for your knees, and just as healthy. Or you can use a crosstrainer if you want the running feel, yet save your knees.

    Of course, while running can be bad for your knees, if you just have good running shoes and take your time to train up your knees before taking on the long runs, you can easily remain damage free.
     
  8. Bubble99 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #8
    Not sure if this is true or not but I hear people that get skipping rope and doing that as a cardio workout will really destroy your knees and be harder on your knees than running?

    I know lot of people in gym do this.

    Jump Rope Workout


    And jumping jacks work out too.


    So anyone here thinking of doing jumping jacks or getting a skipping rope and doing that as a cardio workout other than running may be worse?
     
  9. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #9
    I've been running nearly my entire life and now that I'm in my 50s I think my joints are holding up fairly well. Can running on pavement hurt your knees? Sure over time but so far its been good for me.

    I'd recommend starting up slowly, i.e., adding 10% length to your run once a week. The Couch to 5k programs is a nice way to start running.
     
  10. T'hain Esh Kelch macrumors 601

    T'hain Esh Kelch

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    #10
    I would assume that any exercise where you jump straight up and down will automatically be harder for your knees, compared to the angle at which you push down when running.

    But in general, any exercise where you slam your foot and thus knee into the ground, will be a basis for ruining your knees.
     
  11. makinao macrumors regular

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    Dec 27, 2009
    #11
    If you already have an injury or are predisposed to knee problems, jogging may aggravate it. But if not, you may run/jog without worry as long as you have proper technique.
     
  12. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #12
    Not for nothing, but your other joints including your ankles.
     
  13. Plutonius macrumors 603

    Plutonius

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    #13
    Swimming is much better for your knees.
     
  14. Septembersrain Contributor

    Septembersrain

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    #14
    I agree. My knees have a dislocation problem and swimming is the best recommended cardio for me. I also use an elliptical at home.
     
  15. BasicGreatGuy Contributor

    BasicGreatGuy

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    #15
    Running on a hard surface (re: asphalt or concrete) in and of itself (mileage wise) does not necessarily lead one to have knee problems. What can, and often does cause knee problems, as well as other related running injuries are the following... 1) Wearing the wrong type shoes (worn out shoes, wrong fit, or shoes that don't fit one's natural gait and or using non running shoes)) 2) Having bad running posture (which often puts undue stress on ligaments, joints, and bones) 3) Having weak body core muscles that grow fatigued the longer one runs during the day. Once fatigued, bad form often ensues or gets worse thus leading the way for injury. Heredity can also play a part.
     
  16. JamesMike macrumors demi-god

    JamesMike

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    #16
    I have been running and racing for 53 years including races of 100 miles, have not had any knee or joint problems. You should look at your family genetics that will give you an idea if you are prone to joint problems.
     
  17. Apple fanboy macrumors P6

    Apple fanboy

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    #17
    I think if your young you'll be fine. People who start later in life are more prone to having issues.
    I was advised against running and to cycle instead. I bought a cross trainer but have gotten out of the habit of using it.
     
  18. Moakesy macrumors regular

    Moakesy

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    #18
    As someone who used to run, cycle and swim a lot, I've picked up injuries from all three at some point or another.....and most of those injuries were my own fault for not listening to my body and pushing on regardless.

    Approached correctly, starting to run can increase bone density and help strengthen your legs in general. However, if you try and rush your results, push beyond the level your body is ready for...that is where you can pick up injuries, not just in the joints, but with ligaments and muscles as well.

    Start with run/walk/run, until you find you can run without needing to walk. Then, as others have posted here, don't increase your distance by more than 10% in one go. Also, learn to think of rest as part of your training plan. Running every day will keep your body in a fatigued state, slow down your progress and increase your chance of injury.

    In terms of technique, if you can hear your feet slap/slap/slapping on the floor as you run, then that means a lot of shock is travelling up your legs and into your knees. Hitting the ground heel first is not good, it should be towards the toe. Try and run so your foot strike is almost silent.

    Finally, if you decide running is for you, then I'd really recommend getting some good advice on running shoes from a local independent sport store. They know their stuff, will assess how you run and provide the right shoes for the job by doing something called 'gait analysis'. We don't all run the same way. Decent shoes are much cheaper than physio and far less painful than a sprained something or other.

    Enjoy...
     
  19. A.Goldberg macrumors 68000

    A.Goldberg

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    #19
    As many said here, prolonged running with poor form and shoes overtime may cause joint damage, especiallly if predisposed. Good form, good shoes, and spending time on trails are ways to prevent injury. Also pacing yourself if you do incur injury/pain even if the rest of your body can handle it. I would definitely reccomend going to a real running store with expert staff when buying shoes.

    I'm not even 30 but my back is wrecked from my younger years playing lacrosse. Running for me is pretty much out of the question, the compression on the spine from running (esp. on pavement) exacerbates the issues.

    I've always been an avid swimmer, started competive swimming around age 6. For me it has been a godsend as it's one of the few exercises/sports I can participate in that doesn't require a bottle of Vicodin afterwards. Swimming is super low impact and pretty safe if using proper technique. I'd highly reccomend trying it out if you have joint issues, it's truly a lifelong sport.

    There's dudes who swim a couple miles a day at my pool in their 70's, not bad. My grandfather in his early 90's (and incredibly healthy) still spends a few days a week in the pool. I myself average around 3 miles per day swimming, 4-5 days a week.
     
  20. Bubble99 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Mar 15, 2015
    #20
    I wonder if light jogging may be bit better than running or at least better to start of for newbie? I know lot of people say running can be hard on your knees but what about light jogging or are they about the same. I take sprint running being the worse of all?

    Some people saying doing some light squats and muscle exercises will strength knee, leg and hip and put more pressure on muscle than the joints and ligament.
     
  21. Moakesy macrumors regular

    Moakesy

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    #21
    For me they're inter-changable. The only difference is speed, and your speed is based on how fit your are and how far you are going. You can run fast for 100m, but need to be fitter to run the same speed for 200m.

    I wouldn't worry about it too much nor over think it.

    Start with a bit of a run (or jog) until you need to walk....after you've recovered enough, run for a bit again. Repeat until you've done enough. Depending on how fit you are now, within 2 to 4 weeks you'll be able to run without stopping. Expect your muscles to ache afterwards for a day or two, as they get used to the new regime.

    Then, you either build distance, build speed, or a bit of both. As long as you stick to the 10% rule, and don't heroically push through pain from your knees (or elsewhere) then you should be ok.

    Basically you first need to get fit to train, then you can train to get fit. After fours weeks or so, you'll start to enjoy it. The first four weeks are more of a 'endure it' time.
     
  22. ardchoille50 macrumors 68020

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    Feb 6, 2014
    #22
    Diet is also a factor. You should ensure that you're getting what the body needs instead of having it waste resources processing junk food. Protein, complex carbohydrates and water should be at the top of the list.
     
  23. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #23
    It can. Depends on type of shoes, surface, and how many miles per week. My doctor used to say no more than 15 miles per week which seemed reasonable. I ran until my mid 50's and both my knees and back started bothering me, but I suffer from genetic disk disease, which is very common and can develop without any running.
     

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