Windows 7 OEM Licence, bootcamp/parallels

eltoko

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 23, 2008
24
0
I'm planning on purchasing Windows 7 OEM license (Home Premium) and install on a bootcamp partition on my new iMac. I'm also planning on purchasing Parallels 5, to use on the same partition.

From what I understand this means I will have to register Windows twice, once installing bootcamp and once installing the VM. Will I be able to do this with a OEM license?
 

KeriJane

macrumors 6502a
Sep 26, 2009
578
0
ЧИКАГО!
Don't get the OEM version if you intend to switch back and forth.

The OEM version is meant to be installed on a "new" computer only. Our Macs don't technically qualify because we already bought them before we install Windows. OEM will install but MS doesn't approve and will happily revoke your activation and ability to use the product (without a refund) if they feel that you're violating the EULA or especially if the think you're trying multiple installs.

MS intends the OEM version to be "Married" to one particular computer as determined by unique hardware identifiers. They will interpret frequent changes in perceived hardware (even if it's running on the same physical machine) as an attempt to install on multiple computers.

Using Windows in a virtual machine like Parallels appears differently to the Activation Scheme than Boot Camp does.

The best fix is to crack the Activation, but that's illegal.
The Full Retail version allows you to remove from one computer and install on another. This would probably result in less of a hassle from MS.

I would call MS and explain to them exactly what you want to do before you buy Windows.

Probably they would like you to buy TWO copies of Windows, but maybe the Full Retail version permits this.

All of this nonsense is a big part of the reason that I switched to Mac.

Have Fun,
Keri
 

ThirteenXIII

macrumors 6502a
Mar 8, 2008
720
55
i didnt run into any problems doing this myself.
i did it with XP as well.

as long as its tied to ONE machine it wont really matter.
so if you install Bootcamp, then slap on VM, you should be fine. it should recognize the system fine since youre not on a separate system or piece of hardware.
 

pdjudd

macrumors 601
Jun 19, 2007
4,037
65
Plymouth, MN
i didnt run into any problems doing this myself.
i did it with XP as well.

as long as its tied to ONE machine it wont really matter.
so if you install Bootcamp, then slap on VM, you should be fine. it should recognize the system fine since youre not on a separate system or piece of hardware.
Xp’s activation is very different from that of Vista and 7 - just because it worked on a version of Windows released before Apple went to the Intel platform and could dual boot doesn’t mean that other versions would work the same way.
 

JeffTL

macrumors 6502a
Dec 18, 2003
733
0
I believe that Microsoft has said before, somewhere, that they are aware that the license can be interpreted to allow for installation on one's own system including a Mac, and they really don't care. For one thing, I believe they may make about twice as much money as they do off of a Dell, which isn't bad. But the trade-offs are that the installer of the software is responsible for support (that is, you are on your own) and you don't get transfer rights.
 

balamw

Moderator
Staff member
Aug 16, 2005
19,366
978
New England
I believe that Microsoft has said before, somewhere, that they are aware that the license can be interpreted to allow for installation on one's own system including a Mac, and they really don't care. For one thing, I believe they may make about twice as much money as they do off of a Dell, which isn't bad. But the trade-offs are that the installer of the software is responsible for support (that is, you are on your own) and you don't get transfer rights.
I too have used OEM in the past and interpreted the license as allowing for it, but that was the case before they revised the System Builder License. Now it is quite clear that the loophole is no longer there. So, if you care about the licenses don't get OEM, go full retail or you are in no better shape than someone who does a clean install of an Upgrade Edition without a previous version or a person who installs OS X on non-Apple hardware.

It's a personal decision just like those other cases, and here's one opinion that says go for it even though he knows it is against the current license. http://blogs.zdnet.com/Bott/?p=1561

I say be aware that you are not properly licensed when you use OEM today and do no preinstall or resell the system, so do as you wish, but don't fool yourself into thinking you have a valid license.

B
 

Jacob R

macrumors newbie
Dec 11, 2009
1
0
I'm planning on purchasing Windows 7 OEM license (Home Premium) and install on a bootcamp partition on my new iMac. I'm also planning on purchasing Parallels 5, to use on the same partition.

From what I understand this means I will have to register Windows twice, once installing bootcamp and once installing the VM. Will I be able to do this with a OEM license?
Did you attempt this install? I already have a copy of Windows 7 OEM, and am considering the same thing.
 

Nano2k

macrumors regular
Nov 6, 2009
109
0
Europe
I bought some Windows 7 Ultimate serials on Ebay for 20$a pop. Installed Win7 in bootcamp and it activated. Later I installed Parallels 5 and used the bootcamp partition as image and it activated fine. Both are activated now.

I admit I'm not sure what version my serial is for but at that price it's gotta be OEM^^ Windows desktop PC running great with same type of serial too^^
 

billynicol

macrumors newbie
Apr 7, 2009
6
0
Activation of BootCamp and Windows 7 VM

Don't get the OEM version if you intend to switch back and forth.

The OEM version is meant to be installed on a "new" computer only. Our Macs don't technically qualify because we already bought them before we install Windows. OEM will install but MS doesn't approve and will happily revoke your activation and ability to use the product (without a refund) if they feel that you're violating the EULA or especially if the think you're trying multiple installs.

MS intends the OEM version to be "Married" to one particular computer as determined by unique hardware identifiers. They will interpret frequent changes in perceived hardware (even if it's running on the same physical machine) as an attempt to install on multiple computers.

Using Windows in a virtual machine like Parallels appears differently to the Activation Scheme than Boot Camp does.

The best fix is to crack the Activation, but that's illegal.
The Full Retail version allows you to remove from one computer and install on another. This would probably result in less of a hassle from MS.

I would call MS and explain to them exactly what you want to do before you buy Windows.

Probably they would like you to buy TWO copies of Windows, but maybe the Full Retail version permits this.

All of this nonsense is a big part of the reason that I switched to Mac.

Have Fun,
Keri[/QUOTE

I bought the full retail Windows 7 Home Premium (£102 in a well known giant supermarket, UK) not the OEM and installed on a Boot Camp partition iMac (late 2007, 2.4Ghz, 4GB RAM) and activated it. When I then switched to Mac and set a virtual machine up using Boot Camp, there were Prallels warnings that I would have to reactivate this (and Office MS) as there were significant changes to the machine Windows was on!

I then called a Customer Service Representative on the activation helpline and explained what I was using the software for and they said that was okay as it was really one machine and they helped me activate it on the VM using the sets of numbers etc.

So after a few hours, going between the two I seem to have full activation. The otehr great thing is anything I do on the VM is actually happening on the Boot Camp partition so it is genuinely just using the one machine.

Hope that helps?

Bill
 

TheAshMan

macrumors regular
Jan 22, 2009
192
0
Washington D.C.
...
The best fix is to crack the Activation, but that's illegal.
The Full Retail version allows you to remove from one computer and install on another. This would probably result in less of a hassle from MS.

I would call MS and explain to them exactly what you want to do before you buy Windows.

Probably they would like you to buy TWO copies of Windows, but maybe the Full Retail version permits this.

All of this nonsense is a big part of the reason that I switched to Mac.,
...
Keri
I appreciate that you are trying to offer other good advice, but why mention "cracking the Activation". If advising someone on a clothing purchase would you mention "just shove them in your bag" if they don't like the price? Why is it nonsense? Because they make it harder to steal? Funny, I have never had a problem with MS or any other software licensing because I buy it and don't try to cheat anyone. We tend to be too careless with that issue on these and other forums, can't we raise our standards above theft? :(
 

Travisimo

macrumors 6502a
Dec 22, 2009
985
224
Just bite the bullet and buy the full version... that's what I did. That way, if you get a different Mac you can still reactivate. On my 27" iMac, I activated first in Parallels. When I tried to activate in Boot Camp, I had to do phone activation, but it only took about 10 minutes and now I'm activated in both.
 

ildondeigiocchi

macrumors 6502a
Dec 30, 2007
695
0
Montreal
Don't get the OEM version if you intend to switch back and forth.

The OEM version is meant to be installed on a "new" computer only. Our Macs don't technically qualify because we already bought them before we install Windows. OEM will install but MS doesn't approve and will happily revoke your activation and ability to use the product (without a refund) if they feel that you're violating the EULA or especially if the think you're trying multiple installs.

MS intends the OEM version to be "Married" to one particular computer as determined by unique hardware identifiers. They will interpret frequent changes in perceived hardware (even if it's running on the same physical machine) as an attempt to install on multiple computers.

Using Windows in a virtual machine like Parallels appears differently to the Activation Scheme than Boot Camp does.

The best fix is to crack the Activation, but that's illegal.
The Full Retail version allows you to remove from one computer and install on another. This would probably result in less of a hassle from MS.

I would call MS and explain to them exactly what you want to do before you buy Windows.

Probably they would like you to buy TWO copies of Windows, but maybe the Full Retail version permits this.

All of this nonsense is a big part of the reason that I switched to Mac.

Have Fun,
Keri
The full retail version also allows you to install it only on "one" computer. I put this in quotes since if Microsoft had to revoke the licence from every user who simply had to reinstall an OS after a HDD failure due viruses which Windows OS's are prone to or for other reasons, they would have to revoke the copies of over half the PC users who bought a copy of Windows.:rolleyes: OEM is the Win7 just without any fancy retail box packaging. :)
 

maflynn

Moderator
Staff member
May 3, 2009
66,400
33,052
Boston
Get the full license, it may be more expensive but it appears that MS has closed the loop holes regarding the OEM and since the version is not being pre-installed onto a new computer [for sale] it really doesn't fit.
 

balamw

Moderator
Staff member
Aug 16, 2005
19,366
978
New England
OEM is the Win7 just without any fancy retail box packaging. :)
This is simply not true, at least in the US.

OEM and retail are covered by different End User License Agreements http://www.microsoft.com/about/legal/useterms/ retail is "From a store ..." OEM is "Pre-installed on your computer ..." because OEM is also covered by the System Builder License http://oem.microsoft.com/licensing which requires it to be pre-installed and sold to a non-related third party.

The retail license comes with these terms:

17. TRANSFER TO ANOTHER COMPUTER.
a. Software Other than Windows Anytime Upgrade. You may transfer the software and install it on another computer for your use. That computer becomes the licensed computer. You may not do so to share this license between computers.
b. Windows Anytime Upgrade Software. You may transfer the software and install it on another computer, but only if the license terms of the software you upgraded from allows you to do so. That computer becomes the licensed computer. You may not do so to share this license between computers.
That entire section of the EULA is missing from the OEM version.

(That section also makes it so you can't use Windows Anytime Upgrades to make an OEM license "transferrable.")

There are plenty of real differences between retail and OEM versions beyond this. One being that OEM only comes with 32 or 64 bit versions while retail comes with both. Another being that OEM versions do not allow for in-place upgrades from previous versions of Windows. You can't upgrade from Vista to 7 with an OEM disc.

B
 

Winni

Suspended
Oct 15, 2008
3,205
1,190
Germany.
Don't get the OEM version if you intend to switch back and forth.

The OEM version is meant to be installed on a "new" computer only. Our Macs don't technically qualify because we already bought them before we install Windows. OEM will install but MS doesn't approve and will happily revoke your activation and ability to use the product (without a refund) if they feel that you're violating the EULA or especially if the think you're trying multiple installs.

That is all completely wrong.

It is perfectly fine to install an OEM version of Windows on a Mac. Full stop and without any discussion.


However, only the Professional and Ultimate versions allow for the use of the product in a native installation -and- within a Virtual Machine on the -same- physical computer. Their license explicitly allows for that, but yes, you probably need to go through the phone activation system to activate the second installation.

There is absolutely no reason to purchase the expensive retail version of Windows whose only differences to the OEM version are a) the included support from Microsoft and b) the second installation medium so that you have both the x86 and the x64 architecture medium. But that medium can also be ordered for something around 20 Euros handling cost directly from Microsoft for the OEM version as well, because the Windows license that you purchase from them is not bound to a specific architecture.
 

balamw

Moderator
Staff member
Aug 16, 2005
19,366
978
New England
That is all completely wrong.

It is perfectly fine to install an OEM version of Windows on a Mac. Full stop and without any discussion.
Technically and practically I agree with you, but that is equivalent to saying that it is perfectly fine to install OS X on a Dell Mini 9. Technically and practically it works fine, but it is not using the software according to the terms of the license.

Microsoft has an entire page dedicated to the issue of OEM use by end users http://oem.microsoft.com/script/contentpage.aspx?PageID=563841

The situation is so messy that even Windows evangelists like Ed Bott suggest ignoring the restrictions of the OEM license. http://blogs.zdnet.com/Bott/?p=1561

Like Ed Bott, I'm fine if you ultimately decide to use OEM outside of it's license terms, but please acknowledge and understand that you are doing so when you make that choice.

EDIT: Also, Windows 7 Home Premium now includes the exact same language w.r.t .virtualization as Professional and Ultimate, so I really don't know where you are getting your information from. I just copied these terms from the OEM version's EULA.

Use with Virtualization Technologies. Instead of using the software directly on the licensed computer, you may install and use the software within only one virtual (or otherwise emulated) hardware system on the licensed computer. When used in a virtualized environment, content protected by digital rights management technology, BitLocker or any full volume disk drive encryption technology may not be as secure as protected content not in a virtualized environment. You should comply with all domestic and international laws that apply to such protected content.
This all may be different in Germany, but this is how it is in the US where most MR readers are.

B
 

mikeblah

macrumors newbie
Jan 7, 2010
1
0
I have a question...

OK, I installed (via Boot Camp) and activated a new retail version of Windows 7 on my iMac and activated it. That's fine.

Now I run Parallels and when starting up warns that I have to activate it, etc.

If I use the same activation key in Parallels, will it work and just deactivate the 'Boot Camp Install'? I ask because this would actually be fine by me. I don't have to boto into windows and had I realized I would have just activated through Parallels in the first place.

Thanks for the clarification. I appreciate it.
 

maflynn

Moderator
Staff member
May 3, 2009
66,400
33,052
Boston
You have to call to get the second activation, its no problem many people have done w/o any issues.
 

Nano2k

macrumors regular
Nov 6, 2009
109
0
Europe
I activated just fine from Windows in booth bootcamp and VM. First installed in bootcamp, activated, then used bootcamp partition in Parallels and activated again.
 

Travisimo

macrumors 6502a
Dec 22, 2009
985
224
I have a question...

OK, I installed (via Boot Camp) and activated a new retail version of Windows 7 on my iMac and activated it. That's fine.

Now I run Parallels and when starting up warns that I have to activate it, etc.

If I use the same activation key in Parallels, will it work and just deactivate the 'Boot Camp Install'? I ask because this would actually be fine by me. I don't have to boto into windows and had I realized I would have just activated through Parallels in the first place.

Thanks for the clarification. I appreciate it.
I just did this myself, although in reverse. I activated first in Parallels, then when I tried to activate in Boot Camp, it didn't work. A quick phone call solved the problem in less than 10 minutes. You don't have to actually talk to anyone live, it's all automated and you just have to enter a bunch of numbers (verbally or with your phone's keypad) and tell the prompt that you are only installing on one computer. Quick and easy and now activated in both.
 

tann

macrumors 68000
Apr 15, 2010
1,732
434
UK
I just did this myself, although in reverse. I activated first in Parallels, then when I tried to activate in Boot Camp, it didn't work. A quick phone call solved the problem in less than 10 minutes. You don't have to actually talk to anyone live, it's all automated and you just have to enter a bunch of numbers (verbally or with your phone's keypad) and tell the prompt that you are only installing on one computer. Quick and easy and now activated in both.

Where would one find said phone number? (I live in the UK if that makes a difference...)
 
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