Would memory upgrade solve this?

rhaeny

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Apr 28, 2011
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0
I have an iMac (21.5-inch, Late 2013), 2.7Ghz, 8GB ram, 1TB (5400 rpm) running the latest version of High Sierra.

I have some windows programs that I MUST run and bootcamp isn't an option because I need to have both my Mac and Windows up at the same time. I use another windows computer I have and use the remote desktop to access it from my Mac.

I have a 2nd monitor hooked up to my Mac so this setup works great except that as time goes on, the spinning beachball appears ALL of the time. I checked out my memory and most of the time it's way less than 1GB free.

So I decided to try parallels instead. I did a fresh install of High Sierra prior to loading parallels and I'll be darn if the same thing doesn't crop up. It's not as bad as it was, but I am sick of seeing that spinning ball LOL!

When I look at system monitor, ram is the only thing that is low even though the pressure area still shows green. No issue with HD space as I am only using 300G of the 1TB.

So my question is would an upgrade on my memory resolve this? The only thing is that my model has max 16GB. There is no access from the back so they would need to pull off the screen to install so I think it may get pretty expensive.

Just looking for some advice or other possible solutions. I even thought about just selling the one I have and buying a new one, however I just want to make sure I'm not overlooking something.
 

nambuccaheadsau

macrumors 68000
Oct 19, 2007
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Nambucca Heads Australia
You are confusing free space on the hard drive.

Your problem is the slow as molasses laptop style 5400rpm hard drive. Apple crippled the 21.5" models with this drive. Switch to an SSD and you will see an immediate improvement. The easiest way to do this is through an SSD mounted in an external caddy and connected via USB3. Use cloning software to copy the contents of thew hard drive to the external and then select this as the boot drive in System Preferences > Startup Disk.

Also, High Sierra was designed to run on SSDs and this will also be an improvement. Also consider upgrading the emory to the maximum of 16GB and your iMac will get a whole new lease of life with these two upgrades.
 
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mreg376

macrumors 65816
Mar 23, 2008
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Absolutely agree that the two upgrades, SSD and maxing out the memory, will be like having a new computer. There are plenty of Youtubes out there about about installing an SSD in your model iMac. If you're careful, get the necessary suction cups for glass removal and torx screwdrivers (cheap), you're good to go. If you buy the SSD from OWC (macsales.com) they include the proper screwdrivers for a minimal fee.
 
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rhaeny

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Apr 28, 2011
17
0
You are confusing free space on the hard drive.

Your problem is the slow as molasses laptop style 5400rpm hard drive. Apple crippled the 21.5" models with this drive. Switch to an SSD and you will see an immediate improvement. The easiest way to do this is through an SSD mounted in an external caddy and connected via USB3. Use cloning software to copy the contents of thew hard drive to the external and then select this as the boot drive in System Preferences > Startup Disk.

Also, High Sierra was designed to run on SSDs and this will also be an improvement. Also consider upgrading the emory to the maximum of 16GB and your iMac will get a whole new lease of life with these two upgrades.
OMG!! I just hollered laughing :D! You just made my day! Slow as molasses...HAHAHAHAHA!!!

I honestly never understood all the different type of HD's, but I do know that SSD would be a better move. I've been buying macs for at least 15 years and this is the worse one I've ever had in regards to performance, and now I know why! Cuz it's slow as molasses!!

I was thinking I'd have to buy a whole new computer to make this thing work. I"m so glad you gave you me a better alternative.

A few other questions please. Since they (The Apple Store) have to remove the screen to upgrade the ram, would it make sense to have the HD replaced at the same time, or just stick with an external drive? Do you have any recommendations on the makes of reputable SSD's and cloning software?

Thanks a bunch for your help!
 

borgranta

macrumors 6502
May 9, 2018
304
96
2 Mac computers with one running bootcamp and the other running Mac might be a solution. I saw a 13.3 inch MacBook Air for just under $850 with an 128GB PCIe-based SSD
 

rhaeny

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Apr 28, 2011
17
0
Absolutely agree that the two upgrades, SSD and maxing out the memory, will be like having a new computer. There are plenty of Youtubes out there about about installing an SSD in your model iMac. If you're careful, get the necessary suction cups for glass removal and torx screwdrivers (cheap), you're good to go. If you buy the SSD from OWC (macsales.com) they include the proper screwdrivers for a minimal fee.
I'm sorry I just saw your reply. Okay so I can install memory myself on this model? I thought that because of the screen issue I shouldn't touch it. On my other Macs it was easy to upgrade the memory. I'm not sure how I got suckered into this bastardized model that requires the face to come off before any upgrades :mad:. I'm pretty good when it comes down to the technical stuff so I'm going to check some youtube videos out.
 

mreg376

macrumors 65816
Mar 23, 2008
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Just took a look, and you can do both the memory and SSD upgrade yourself. macsales.com has a 16GB kit that includes all of the tools (and suction cups) you need. Just add an SSD and you're good to go. I would call and ask them if the tool kit that comes with the 16GB upgrade is all you need to complete the SSD install too. Probably is.
 
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borgranta

macrumors 6502
May 9, 2018
304
96
OMG!! I just hollered laughing :D! You just made my day! Slow as molasses...HAHAHAHAHA!!!

I honestly never understood all the different type of HD's, but I do know that SSD would be a better move. I've been buying macs for at least 15 years and this is the worse one I've ever had in regards to performance, and now I know why! Cuz it's slow as molasses!!

I was thinking I'd have to buy a whole new computer to make this thing work. I"m so glad you gave you me a better alternative.

A few other questions please. Since they (The Apple Store) have to remove the screen to upgrade the ram, would it make sense to have the HD replaced at the same time, or just stick with an external drive? Do you have any recommendations on the makes of reputable SSD's and cloning software?

Thanks a bunch for your help!
It would probably be cheaper to get both upgrades done in one visit.
 
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rhaeny

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Apr 28, 2011
17
0
2 Mac computers with one running bootcamp and the other running Mac might be a solution. I saw a 13.3 inch MacBook Air for just under $850 with an 128GB PCIe-based SSD
That's interesting as well. I could just hook it up to my second monitor and get the same setup I have now? I wonder is that cheaper than buying an SSD and memory installation from the Apple store?
 

borgranta

macrumors 6502
May 9, 2018
304
96
I'm sorry I just saw your reply. Okay so I can install memory myself on this model? I thought that because of the screen issue I shouldn't touch it. On my other Macs it was easy to upgrade the memory. I'm not sure how I got suckered into this bastardized model that requires the face to come off before any upgrades :mad:. I'm pretty good when it comes down to the technical stuff so I'm going to check some youtube videos out.
It is easier for users to upgrade ram and SSD on the Mac Pro.
[doublepost=1528081847][/doublepost]Apple store employees would probably transfer the contents of the old hard drive to the new SSD which could be beneficial. The downside to upgrading the iMac yourself may be the risk of losing the rights to having your product repaired at an Apple store.
 
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mreg376

macrumors 65816
Mar 23, 2008
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330
Brooklyn, NY
I'm sorry I just saw your reply. Okay so I can install memory myself on this model? I thought that because of the screen issue I shouldn't touch it. On my other Macs it was easy to upgrade the memory. I'm not sure how I got suckered into this bastardized model that requires the face to come off before any upgrades :mad:. I'm pretty good when it comes down to the technical stuff so I'm going to check some youtube videos out.
Don't feel bad that you were "suckered." A lot of people just got suckered in the same way on $5,000+ iMac Pros. But it is doable yourself (if you're at all technologically inclined), and you're losing nothing since you're obviously past warranty. I'm not even sure if Apple will install parts that you supply to them, and if you have to buy Apple parts you're looking at big $$$ for the job. Maybe someone else can chime in on that.
 
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borgranta

macrumors 6502
May 9, 2018
304
96
That's interesting as well. I could just hook it up to my second monitor and get the same setup I have now? I wonder is that cheaper than buying an SSD and memory installation from the Apple store?
The Apple store could probably quote you the cost of upgrade.
[doublepost=1528082308][/doublepost]
That's interesting as well. I could just hook it up to my second monitor and get the same setup I have now? I wonder is that cheaper than buying an SSD and memory installation from the Apple store?
The Mac Mini is even cheaper at $419 refurbished or $499 new assuming you have a compatible monitor for the mini. Also keep an eye on WWDC since Mac Mini may either get a date or slashed prices.
 

rhaeny

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Apr 28, 2011
17
0
The Apple store could probably quote you the cost of upgrade.
[doublepost=1528082308][/doublepost]
The Mac Mini is even cheaper at $419 refurbished or $499 new assuming you have a compatible monitor for the mini. Also keep an eye on WWDC since Mac Mini may either get a date or slashed prices.
Okay this another good option. And I assume that the apple store wants $$$ to upgrade anything. I was going to take it to them, but if I can attempt it by myself then I will to save some money. I've fuddled around with this kind of stuff on my other Macs, but they were easy access. My Mac is not under warranty anymore so I'm not sure what I could lose by trying it myself.

What is WWDC? Thanks!!
[doublepost=1528085785][/doublepost]Lord, I just watched a video on how to install memory on this thing. You dang near have to take the entire thing apart :(. What in the world were they thinking to make this so difficult?

I thought maybe I'd have to take the glass off (of which this guy uses a pizza cutter to cut the tape around the edges :eek:) and then maybe a few screws (I think I counted 14 screws and the guy still wasn't finished removing them).

But nooooooo, you gotta take the fan off, unhook cords and clamps, take the circuit board off, remove the speakers, and just basically gut the thing out!

Sighhhh, yea I'm gonna have to take this somewhere to have the memory upgraded :rolleyes:
 
Last edited:

borgranta

macrumors 6502
May 9, 2018
304
96
Okay this another good option. And I assume that the apple store wants $$$ to upgrade anything. I was going to take it to them, but if I can attempt it by myself then I will to save some money. I've fuddled around with this kind of stuff on my other Macs, but they were easy access. My Mac is not under warranty anymore so I'm not sure what I could lose by trying it myself.

What is WWDC? Thanks!!
[doublepost=1528085785][/doublepost]Lord, I just watched a video on how to install memory on this thing. You dang near have to take the entire thing apart :(. What in the world were they thinking to make this so difficult?

I thought maybe I'd have to take the glass off (of which this guy uses a pizza cutter to cut the tape around the edges :eek:) and then maybe a few screws (I think I counted 14 screws and the guy still wasn't finished removing them).

But nooooooo, you gotta take the fan off, unhook cords and clamps, take the circuit board off, remove the speakers, and just basically gut the thing out!

Sighhhh, yea I'm gonna have to take this somewhere to have the memory upgraded :rolleyes:
An unauthorized repair or modification can result in the owner being denied the right to have it repaired by Apple store technicians at a later time due to Apple's terms of service.
 

tubeexperience

macrumors 68040
Feb 17, 2016
3,192
3,893
Okay this another good option. And I assume that the apple store wants $$$ to upgrade anything. I was going to take it to them, but if I can attempt it by myself then I will to save some money. I've fuddled around with this kind of stuff on my other Macs, but they were easy access. My Mac is not under warranty anymore so I'm not sure what I could lose by trying it myself.

What is WWDC? Thanks!!
[doublepost=1528085785][/doublepost]Lord, I just watched a video on how to install memory on this thing. You dang near have to take the entire thing apart :(. What in the world were they thinking to make this so difficult?

I thought maybe I'd have to take the glass off (of which this guy uses a pizza cutter to cut the tape around the edges :eek:) and then maybe a few screws (I think I counted 14 screws and the guy still wasn't finished removing them).

But nooooooo, you gotta take the fan off, unhook cords and clamps, take the circuit board off, remove the speakers, and just basically gut the thing out!

Sighhhh, yea I'm gonna have to take this somewhere to have the memory upgraded :rolleyes:
https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/iMac+Intel+21.5-Inch+EMC+2638+RAM+Replacement/28795

It's not too hard to do yourself.

Tedious is more like it.

I would recommend that you get a second person to hold the display while you remove/reinstall the display connectors.
[doublepost=1528088190][/doublepost]
Don't feel bad that you were "suckered." A lot of people just got suckered in the same way on $5,000+ iMac Pros. But it is doable yourself (if you're at all technologically inclined), and you're losing nothing since you're obviously past warranty. I'm not even sure if Apple will install parts that you supply to them, and if you have to buy Apple parts you're looking at big $$$ for the job. Maybe someone else can chime in on that.
The Federal Trade Commission staff has sent warning letters to six major companies that market and sell automobiles, cellular devices, and video gaming systems in the United States.

The letters warn that FTC staff has concerns about the companies’ statements that consumers must use specified parts or service providers to keep their warranties intact. Unless warrantors provide the parts or services for free or receive a waiver from the FTC, such statements generally are prohibited by the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, a law that governs consumer product warranties. Similarly, such statements may be deceptive under the FTC Act.
 

mreg376

macrumors 65816
Mar 23, 2008
1,140
330
Brooklyn, NY
https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/iMac+Intel+21.5-Inch+EMC+2638+RAM+Replacement/28795

It's not too hard to do yourself.

Tedious is more like it.

I would recommend that you get a second person to hold the display while you remove/reinstall the display connectors.
[doublepost=1528088190][/doublepost]

The Federal Trade Commission staff has sent warning letters to six major companies that market and sell automobiles, cellular devices, and video gaming systems in the United States.

The letters warn that FTC staff has concerns about the companies’ statements that consumers must use specified parts or service providers to keep their warranties intact. Unless warrantors provide the parts or services for free or receive a waiver from the FTC, such statements generally are prohibited by the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, a law that governs consumer product warranties. Similarly, such statements may be deceptive under the FTC Act.
You were wrong when you brought this up in another thread, and you're wrong now. This has nothing to do with a warranty. The OP's machine is out of warranty. Apple can chose what out-of-warranty machines it wants to service and which it doesn't. You should really stop giving baseless and misleading "information."
 

tubeexperience

macrumors 68040
Feb 17, 2016
3,192
3,893
You were wrong when you brought this up in another thread, and you're wrong now. This has nothing to do with a warranty. The OP's machine is out of warranty. Apple can chose what out-of-warranty machines it wants to service and which it doesn't. You should really stop giving baseless and misleading "information."
You make a good point.

If the machine is out of warranty, why would you even serviced it with Apple?
 

mreg376

macrumors 65816
Mar 23, 2008
1,140
330
Brooklyn, NY
Well, it appears that the OP isn't too excited about tearing down the innards of his iMac, and I can't blame him. Apple might be expensive but they do know how to work on their equipment, which is probably why he's considering it.
 

tubeexperience

macrumors 68040
Feb 17, 2016
3,192
3,893
Well, it appears that the OP isn't too excited about tearing down the innards of his iMac, and I can't blame him. Apple might be expensive but they do know how to work on their equipment, which is probably why he's considering it.
As we all know, nobody else, but Apple know how to work on Macs. /s

You would think that there would be some independent repair shops.
 

mreg376

macrumors 65816
Mar 23, 2008
1,140
330
Brooklyn, NY
As we all know, nobody else, but Apple know how to work on Macs. /s

You would think that there would be some independent repair shops.
Very funny...

There are plenty. I always see these shops claiming to be able to fix any phone, tablet or computer. If they're Apple-certified they're still expensive, and if they're not Apple-certified you're really don't know what you're going to end up with.
 

mreg376

macrumors 65816
Mar 23, 2008
1,140
330
Brooklyn, NY
Look, I'm not thrilled with Apple's very restrictive repair policies either, but they've selling all-in-ones for what, decades? Always with the same "you open it it's yours policy." I don't like it, but I do understand it, and it's withstood the test of time as to its legality. So telling people that what Appel is doing is illegal is really giving them poor advice.
 

tubeexperience

macrumors 68040
Feb 17, 2016
3,192
3,893
Look, I'm not thrilled with Apple's very restrictive repair policies either, but they've selling all-in-ones for what, decades? Always with the same "you open it it's yours policy." I don't like it, but I do understand it, and it's withstood the test of time as to its legality. So telling people that what Appel is doing is illegal is really giving them poor advice.
There are this pesky things called the law.
 

mreg376

macrumors 65816
Mar 23, 2008
1,140
330
Brooklyn, NY
There are these things called reviews.

https://www.yelp.com/biz/rossmann-repair-group-new-york-2

Would you look at that? Wow!
Reviews have a value, of course, especially if you ignore all of the fake reviews floating around. I've never used a computer repair shop because I do my own out-of-warranty computer repairs/modifications, so I have never looked for one. But I can tell that one of the reasons I stay with Apple is because of the Apple stores -- with every other manufacturer you're basically stuck with "authorized repair" shops and I have yet to have a good experience with such repairs to TV's or appliances.
[doublepost=1528090418][/doublepost]
There are this pesky things called the law.
Well, I'm a lawyer, and the law is only pesky when it applies. And it doesn't apply just because you want it to.
 

tubeexperience

macrumors 68040
Feb 17, 2016
3,192
3,893
Reviews have a value, of course, especially if you ignore all of the fake reviews floating around. I've never used a computer repair shop because I do my own out-of-warranty computer repairs/modifications, so I have never looked for one. But I can tell that one of the reasons I stay with Apple is because of the Apple stores -- with every other manufacturer you're basically stuck with "authorized repair" shops and I have yet to have a good experience with such repairs to TV's or appliances.
Stores that repair computers, phones, tablets don't usually repair TV and appliances.
 
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