XP to 7 upgrade in Bootcamp.

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by WilliamBos, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. WilliamBos, Jan 31, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2012

    WilliamBos macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2009
    Location:
    Innisfil, ON
    #1
    Hi All,

    I will soon be setting up XP in bootcamp, and wondered if I can upgrade to 7 the same way one could on a PC? I can get a sweet deal on W7 upgrade from work, so this would avoid buying the full version.

    I will only be using two programs in bootcamp, don't think that would justiy the use of the VM software out there, eh??
     
  2. philipma1957 macrumors 603

    philipma1957

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Location:
    Howell, New Jersey
    #2
    looks like you are running snow on a 2011 mac mini.

    Since thats a hack via kext and plist files I don't know the answer. I can tell you on lion and one 2011 server windows 7 pro worked very easy on the other mac mini server Windows 7 home was hard to get to work AND I PURCHASED VM WARE.
     
  3. quebec macrumors newbie

    quebec

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Location:
    Quebec City, Canada
    #3
    The best thing to do is bypass XP entirely. You'll have a much cleaner install this way, and with half the fooling around to get to your end result. I got the same Windows 7 "Upgrade" DVD that you have/will have. You can install it properly without really 'hacking' anything, just do a quick search in Google, something like 'windows 7 activation from upgrade disk' (I can't give you any links here as I'm a new-er member and they don't allow me to post links yet).
    This is a much better method than first installing XP, trust me.
     
  4. dolphin842 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2004
    #4
    I'm pretty sure Boot Camp only officially supports clean installs. However, as quebec said, Microsoft has provided ways to get a clean install by using upgrade media for situations like these. Paul Thurott has the details.
     
  5. Winni, Feb 1, 2012
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2012

    Winni macrumors 68030

    Winni

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Location:
    Germany.
    #5
    Windows 7, at least in the OEM version, does not support upgrading from XP. You have to do a clean installation, especially when you change the OS architecture from 32-Bit to 64-Bit. And it is STRONGLY recommended to upgrade to 64-Bit Windows 7 when your system has a 64-Bit CPU.

    But even if there was an option to upgrade from any version to another, I wouldn't use it -- not on Windows, not on (Ubuntu) Linux, not even on OS X. In my experience, upgrade installations of -any- operating system never run as smooth as fresh installations because you always have some dead weight and out-dated system files or drivers somewhere that cause problems.

    So the simple rule is to NEVER upgrade but ALWAYS install from scratch, even if it takes more time.

    And yes, to say it again, OS X is no exception to that rule. Upgrading from Tiger to Leopard resulted in an unpredictable and unstable mess on -all- machines that I upgraded. And the upgrade from Leopard to Snow Leopard wasn't much better. The Snow Leopard to Lion upgrade worked the best, but there were still differences in the behavior to a clean Lion installation. So in the end, I always made fresh installations because it's the only way to obtain proper results.

    Okay, just to say it, the situation with (Ubuntu) Linux isn't as bad as it is with OS X or Windows. The upgrades from Ubuntu Server 8.04 LTS to 10.04 LTS that I made went quite well and were acceptable, actually. But still, you carry configuration files for out-dated software versions around and those mixed versions just don't feel right. Whenever I can squeeze it in, I make fresh installations of those previously upgraded systems.

    I know that a lot of people here will disagree with what I said because the one upgrade that they ever tried went okay for them. But before you trust the majority of those posters, you should ask them how many of them actually make their living in professional IT, work in server rooms or maintain global networks and have more than 20 years of experience in the business. I'm just saying that I do not only support my home computer, but real company networks spread across continents, so I get to "play" with a lot of computers and platforms every single day. And when I learned something about Windows and OS X upgrades in those years, then it is that they still suck and are not dependable.

    VMWare: If you are really using only two Windows programs, and if those two programs are not games, then in my opinion it is not justifiable to use Boot Camp! Install Windows in a VM and let those two apps run side by side with your OS X software. It's more efficient and convenient that way. Boot Camp is a crutch for those who want to run power hungry Windows apps like games or certain CAD applications.

    Everybody else who still needs a Windows-only app should either stay on Windows as his/her sole operating system (because if you need software for a different operating system, then clearly you made a poor choice with your current platform) or if you only need that software on rare occasions, a virtual machine is a very comfortable way to use it.

    But I still think that if one cannot live without Windows because the OS is needed to get the work done, then switching to a Mac or a Linux machine is a completely moronic choice. Either the new platform can PROPERLY take over ALL the required tasks or it is a failure. It's that simple.
     
  6. WilliamBos thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2009
    Location:
    Innisfil, ON
    #6
    Thanks. Turbotax is not mac compatible, and using the online mac version is a total rip off. I get better value from the CD version.

    Is VM ware easy to use? Can I remove XP and install 7 when i get a full copy??
     
  7. blevins321 macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2010
    Location:
    Winnipeg, MB
    #7
    Turbo tax is Mac compatible...did my taxes on it last week. The disk has both versions on it.
     
  8. WilliamBos, Feb 1, 2012
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2012

    WilliamBos thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2009
    Location:
    Innisfil, ON
    #8
    Oh really? Which version? I checked the boxes, and it said pc only?? Youin canada? Wonder if us versions are the same?

    Just checked, in Canada, Turbo Tax for mac is online only...
     
  9. dolphin842 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2004
    #9
    If you just need to run a few Windows apps from time to time, virtualization would be the best bet. You don't have to buy VMWare either: VirtualBox from Sun/Oracle is free. Since a VM is just a file on your Mac, you can toss it when you're done with it (i.e. ditching XP for 7).
     
  10. WilliamBos thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2009
    Location:
    Innisfil, ON
    #10
    Thanks. Is Virtual box a good program? Time is tight, use VB, then if need be, get VM later??
     
  11. dolphin842 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2004
    #11
    Yeah I'd definitely give it a try first. VB might require a little more tinkering to get everything running smoothly, but for basic apps, it should work fine. Where VMWare and Parallels shine are in things like better support for graphics acceleration, potentially-quicker setup time, things like that.
     

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