17 inch Macbook Pro (Late 2011) Replacement

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by adeel7861, Jul 20, 2013.

  1. adeel7861, Jul 20, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2013

    adeel7861 macrumors newbie

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    Jul 20, 2013
    #1
    Hey everyone,

    So basically I just received my laptop back from repair for the 3rd time because of video distortion issues I was having (they replaced the logic board 3 times, magsafe board & memory 2 times) cant believe their repair service sucks so bad....SO FAR its working fine. My question is, if the problem occurs again for the 4TH TIME, what are my chances of getting a new laptop as a replacement and if so, what kind of Macbook do you think they will give me? Thanks

    P.S. laptop is a 17 inch Macbook Pro (Late 2011)

    Adeel
     
  2. vpro macrumors 65816

    vpro

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    #2
    Good question.

    They have a lot of refurbs left seems in the online store, so you might get one of those as a replacement??? Good question... Hmmm....
     
  3. thatdjgirl macrumors newbie

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    Apr 17, 2016
    #3
    I had issues with my bac book pro, when I bought it in 2010 (15inh) . after about 8 times of goin to to have it fixed, over the course of about 10 months. I called up and told the people at apple care it was rediculous, and what can we do about this, so they sent me a new MBP, It was basically the same specs, just a year newer. and they gave me a 750g HD instead of the 500g I had in the 2010. Not sure now what they would send to you. I just had the logic board changed last week on this mbp 2011 and it is still giving me issues, and when i brought it back again, they tested it and said hard ware is fine, maybe it is a software issue, maybe as I am still on os 10.68. But I can't help but feel it is still the logic board, and that they gave me a faulty one.
     
  4. Queen6, Apr 17, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2016

    Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #4
    All Apple is doing with these machines is replacing the failed Main Logic Board (MLB) with a refurbished one i.e. another failed MLB that has allegedly been repaired, in reality these refurbished boards are more prone to failure. Unless your under warranty (Apple Care) Apple will likely continue to replace failed MBL with refurbished a one. until the extended cover ends, then you will need to pay for the service yourself.

    Basically it`s just a roll of the dice, if you get a decent refurbished MLB, equally it will fail in time 2-3 year max as it`s related to the design of the machine. Those that don't push their systems may never see issue, those that do, are far more likely to be stuck the same loop as you are now.

    If your relying on the system for professional use, I would cut your losses and replace it, as there is no real solution. Personally I gave up using the MacBook Pro with dGPU several years back for professional purpose, as Apple`s track record with the MacBook Pro and dGPU is tragic at best...

    Q-6
     
  5. MRxROBOT macrumors 6502

    MRxROBOT

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    #5
    Apple does not send refurbs as replacements. IF someone was to get a replacement machine for any reason it would be a new comparable machine. Today, 17" models would be replaced with 15" models as it is the largest screen offered. That said, unless one has Applecare Apple does not seem to be replacing the affected machines. More often than not repairing as many times as need be until they don't have to. A raw deal to any one with one of these machines.
     
  6. ron1004 macrumors 6502

    ron1004

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    #6
    Do you have any references to support that claim?

    I doubt anyone here knows, but if the refurbished boards were done by reballing using lead based solder, they are likely to outlast the new original boards that were assembled with lead-free solder.
     
  7. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #7
    There more than enough circumstantial evidence across this forum alone. I also have specific insight into the refurbishment of complex electronic assemblies in the energy industry; analysis reveals that refurbished/reworked electronic boards are 7-10 times more likely to failure, with these assemblies being reworked by highly competent technicians, with all appropriate training, equipment & controlled environments. This is for boards ranging from $10K to >$40K, I seriously doubt Apple comes anywhere near close to such levels of attention to detail for a consumer grade notebook Logic Board. Fundamentally the boards are not designed to be repaired, hence why the failure rate is significantly elevated once they are reworked, as the only way to conduct repair to apply heat, be it uniformly or localised.

    The dGPU can be reballed with leaded solder, equally sourcing a known good chip will be problematic. Apple will only be using lead free solder as they have no alternative. Third party Apple specialists will likely opt for leaded solder. The failure mechanism is also related to the fabrication of the dGPU and Apple`s deliberate choice of limiting cooling for the sake of a thinner platform. Basically the rapid heating & cooling cycles breaks down the dGPU down over time, the higher the delta, the more rapid failure is likely to occur. This why those who push the dGPU hard see failure far sooner, than those that only use the MBP`s moderately.

    Personally if I need a notebook with a dGPU, I would opt for one of the new Thunderbolt 3 solutions with an eGPU, or remote into a desktop solution, as downtime for me is the real cost.

    Q-6
     
  8. tubeexperience macrumors 68030

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    Feb 17, 2016
    #8
    There are plenty of evidence out there if you don't bury your head in the sand.

    A lot of people on this forum (with the 2011 MBP) are already on their second or third logic board replacement and some already had their computers replaced by Apple.
     
  9. dealmaker macrumors regular

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    Sep 24, 2010
    #9
    I think the problem is, as has been identified by any number of electronic/PCG engineers - that a refurbished board can never be as reliable as one which was built from scratch on a proper production line. Failure rates are widely acknowledged as being 7 to 10 times MORE likely......on a refurbished board....

    So Apple are fixing one inherent design issue - with a stop gap solution which is VERY likely to fail again..(and bear in mind that ATi are doing the refurbishment and bearing the cost - so you can bet your house on the fact that they will be doing it a cheaply as they can) .....obviously they hope that you won't stress the board/GPU too greatly in the first 90 days .....and the board will last beyond December when the recall expires....and then you are on your own. Several of us have had the original board fail only for the replacement boards to fail again......and again.

    I had three boards fail on my 2012 15" rMBP - and the Apple store called me yesterday to say that they are putting the second board into my 17" MBP (this first replacement lasted 45 days before it failed).

    I am pleased Apple are standing by their product (though admittedly ATi are bearing much of the pain) - but I do think they must be cognisant of the fact that the "repairs" they are making are nowhere near as robust as the initial board which the machines had "from new" ...and so by default they must know that these machines will also fail in relatively short order...
     
  10. thatdjgirl macrumors newbie

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    Apr 17, 2016
    #10
    Does any one here actually know what is the problem with these Logic board??? I don't really know, I understand ( maybe incorrectly) it has something to do with there being 2 graphics chips, that switch back and forth as needed depending on what your computer is doing. Is it because they switch back and fourth that there is a problem? Or I read something about how it is attached to the board?
    Since I got my computer back from being fixed last week it has crashed several times, but when i go to the store they tell me the hard ware is testing fine. I suppose I have to wait until it completely fails and the computer wont boot, before they will fix it...
     
  11. MRxROBOT macrumors 6502

    MRxROBOT

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    #11
    Lead free solder
     
  12. thatdjgirl macrumors newbie

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    #12
    and do you know why this makes the board fail like it does???
     
  13. MRxROBOT macrumors 6502

    MRxROBOT

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    #13
    The lead free solder can’t withstand as many heat cycles as traditional lead solder. So the more times it goes through these cycles expanding and contracting it eventually weakens and cracks.
     
  14. dealmaker macrumors regular

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    Sep 24, 2010
    #14
    The most annoying this is that Apple know these refurbished boards are worse than the new build boards that were originally fitted and also know they are very likely to fail well before the rest of the machine reaches the end of its serviceable life. They should have started production of a new Logic Board with a new method of attaching the dGPU to the board - that eradicates the failure mode.

    They certainly have the capability and the cash to facilitate this - so this "band-aid" solution is corporate greed - plain and simple.....and in the long run it might end up costing them more in terms of repeat repair costs, reputation loss, and loss of goodwill/repeat custom.
     
  15. 273888, Apr 21, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2016

    273888 Suspended

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    Jan 27, 2009
    #15
    I've had 3 logic board replacements on a 15" Late 2011 MBP in the last year and a half. I'm currently trying to negotiate a replacement because I am one of the people who paid out of pocket for the replacement before the did the "recall". I got a refund, but I was promised that if I had any more problems that I would be getting a replacement. I'm keeping my fingers crossed.

    I had it lock up two times yesterday with graphics card glitches. I just want a computer that works... There is nothing wrong with the computer specs wise. I have 16 GB RAM and an i7 in this machine. It can do anything I want now that I replaced the HDD with an SSD. I just want a working computer...
     
  16. dealmaker, Apr 22, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2016

    dealmaker macrumors regular

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    #16
    Some people will say you are being "excessively greedy" by expecting a new computer after "all this time" - they will say that - "hey! you've had 4 years out of it...what more do you expect?"......and...."just be happy that they are repairing it for you for free"

    I disagree....I think you have a flawed product - that was sold without a full development cycle and with, by that stage, a certain degree of cognisance that the lead-free solder would cause issues for certain users.......furthermore Apple have caused you a significant amount of inconvenience and hassle by repeatedly repairing that faulty product with a sub-standard, cheaply re-furbished component, that they know will also fail in short order (as evidenced by your two subsequent failures, and you are one of very, very many).........

    You are not being unreasonable in expecting a computer that works as advertised - and so yes, Apple should replace the computer with a new mid 2015 specification model.
     
  17. dealmaker macrumors regular

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    #17
    I love the comment on another thread - where one poster called this whole discreet GPU issue "Soldergate" !!! :D

    I am going to steal that!
     
  18. tubeexperience macrumors 68030

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    Feb 17, 2016
    #18
    I am putting my 17-inch Macbook Pro (Late 2011) on Craigslist.

    I need it gone quick before it turned into a paperweight.

    Hopefully some sucker would buy it.
     
  19. CoastalOR macrumors 68000

    CoastalOR

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    #19
    Hopefully you will have enough decency to disclose your known problems and repairs. You have complained quite a bit about Apple, but if you find a "sucker" to buy it and do not disclose the issues then you are no better.
     
  20. tubeexperience macrumors 68030

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    Feb 17, 2016
    #20
    Well, I disclosed that the logic board has recently been replaced under "Extension Program for Video Issues".

    Obviously, I am not going to say that the laptop is a POS and that the GPU is going to repeatedly fail, otherwise nobody would buy it.
     
  21. matt_on_a_mtn Suspended

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    Mar 25, 2016
    #21
    You should be ashamed of yourself. The level of hypocrisy you're showing is absolute staggering. You've sat on this forum, spamming every thread you could to bash Apple and the 17" MBP, yet you follow it up with how you're going to trick some sucker into buying it? Sickening.

    If that's how you operate and what you consider good morals, I'd suspect less that it was Apple selling a shoddy product and more that it was karma biting you on the rear.
     
  22. 273888 Suspended

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    Jan 27, 2009
    #22
    I'm doing the exact same thing. I just got my MBP back and they refused to replace it. They just put a new logic board in. As soon as the new MBP are released (WHENEVER THE HELL THAT IS GOING TO BE) I'm putting this one up for sale stating that "logic board replaced in April". It just had the logic board replaced, so according to Apple, it should be good. If the buyer has an issue with it, they can take it up with Apple, because I'm fed up with this POS.
     
  23. tubeexperience macrumors 68030

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    Feb 17, 2016
    #23
    I certainly am not a hypocrite. Apple is the one doing the repairs and it's not my fault that the repairs that Apple has performed are consistently of substandard quality. If the new owner has problems with laptop, he/she can take it up with Apple.

    It might be wise to sell it now before its value depreciates any further.

    As for me, my old 2008-era Dell laptop should be able to get me by for a little while.
     
  24. 273888 Suspended

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    Jan 27, 2009
    #24
    I would, but I need it for school. I don't have a back up machine.
     
  25. tubeexperience macrumors 68030

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    #25
    You should be concerned with having that as your only computer.

    I had due a project that is worth 15% of my grade on my MBP, when the GPU failed and the computer won't boot.

    I had to run out and buy an enclosure to get my project from the hard drive.
     

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