anamboy

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 13, 2018
3
0
Hi everyone,

I just replaced the battery of my mid-2012 15" MacBook Pro for the first time. After calibrating it (steps I took below), I checked the battery with coconutBattery and It's showing that the design capacity is around 88%-90% after only 1 cycle. This isn't normal, right? I didn't check the battery prior to the first cycle.

I've read that coconutBattery's percentages fluctuate because of error margins, so was just wondering what y'all thought. I don't think it's dropping a bunch per cycle, instead, I think it just came missing the 10% charge like its been already used. I did another cycle and its now at 88.1% as I'm writing this (7457 mAH/8460 mAH). Not too knowledgeable when it comes to batteries and their capacities. I have warranty, so should I return it? I attached an image of the coconutBattery info.

Calibration process:
  1. After replacing the battery, plugged the charger in and turned on my macbook (was at around 86% I believe)
  2. Charged to 100%
  3. Waited a few hours
  4. Depleted to 0% until the computer hibernates/sleeps (was using it regularly to watch videos and whatnot)
  5. Left in down state overnight so battery fully drains
  6. Charged to 100% again the next morning
 

Attachments

Webster's Mac

macrumors 6502
Dec 18, 2016
267
201
First off,

Get a replacement battery from the seller.

Second, you NEVER need to run a battery to zero to "calibrate" it. The machine hibernates because it is protecting the battery from being run into a completely discharged state, which is BAD for lithium ion batteries. If you want to run it down until it hibernates, that's fine, but don't leave it in that state very long. Plug it in as soon as you can.
 

Starship67

Suspended
Oct 28, 2017
958
1,335
LA
Check in coconut battery and see the age of that battery. Plus never run a modern li-ion battery to zero. Even going to 10% and 20% regularly isn’t recommended. Li-ion batteries prefer shallow charges to deep ones.
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,425
780
Hi everyone,

I just replaced the battery of my mid-2012 15" MacBook Pro for the first time. After calibrating it (steps I took below), I checked the battery with coconutBattery and It's showing that the design capacity is around 88%-90% after only 1 cycle. This isn't normal, right? I didn't check the battery prior to the first cycle.

I've read that coconutBattery's percentages fluctuate because of error margins, so was just wondering what y'all thought. I don't think it's dropping a bunch per cycle, instead, I think it just came missing the 10% charge like its been already used. I did another cycle and its now at 88.1% as I'm writing this (7457 mAH/8460 mAH). Not too knowledgeable when it comes to batteries and their capacities. I have warranty, so should I return it? I attached an image of the coconutBattery info.

Calibration process:
  1. After replacing the battery, plugged the charger in and turned on my macbook (was at around 86% I believe)
  2. Charged to 100%
  3. Waited a few hours
  4. Depleted to 0% until the computer hibernates/sleeps (was using it regularly to watch videos and whatnot)
  5. Left in down state overnight so battery fully drains
  6. Charged to 100% again the next morning
Apple batteries haven't required calibration for many years. Just run on battery whenever you need to and plug it in whenever you can.

It is normal for a new battery to be somewhat above or below 100%, but not that far below. Where did you get the battery? If you got it from someplace other than Apple, all bets are off. If you had it replaced by someone other than Apple, it's not covered by warranty. If Apple replaced it, take it back and let them take care of it.
 

Samuelsan2001

macrumors 604
Oct 24, 2013
7,694
2,121
As others said you did more damage to your battery than anything else, give it a few charge cycles and see how it is by around 10 if it’s no better send it back.
 

anamboy

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 13, 2018
3
0
Where did you buy the battery from...?
From a seller on Amazon - Husan to be exact. Here is the link.

They seem reliable from the reviews.
[doublepost=1545146438][/doublepost]
First off,

Get a replacement battery from the seller.

Second, you NEVER need to run a battery to zero to "calibrate" it. The machine hibernates because it is protecting the battery from being run into a completely discharged state, which is BAD for lithium ion batteries. If you want to run it down until it hibernates, that's fine, but don't leave it in that state very long. Plug it in as soon as you can.
Oh thanks for the info, I didn't know that. I bought the battery from an Amazon seller and one of the reviewers posted a comment about running his battery into hibernate and then letting it sit for over 5 hours to completely discharge. Said he had 95%-100% design capacity after and was good - is that all just bs? Here is the link to the review if you wanna check it out.
[doublepost=1545147355][/doublepost]
Check in coconut battery and see the age of that battery. Plus never run a modern li-ion battery to zero. Even going to 10% and 20% regularly isn’t recommended. Li-ion batteries prefer shallow charges to deep ones.
Yeah, I'm really starting to see from the comments that it was a bad idea to do the calibrating I did. It is recommended to run the battery down to a low charge once a month though right?
[doublepost=1545147490][/doublepost]
Your procedure is what you did in the old NiCad days. Don't do that with your battery. Just use the system.
By use the system, you mean just use it as I normally would? I try to keep it on a charger and run the battery down to low (and not hibernate) once a month using battery guardian.
[doublepost=1545147738][/doublepost]
Apple batteries haven't required calibration for many years. Just run on battery whenever you need to and plug it in whenever you can.

It is normal for a new battery to be somewhat above or below 100%, but not that far below. Where did you get the battery? If you got it from someplace other than Apple, all bets are off. If you had it replaced by someone other than Apple, it's not covered by warranty. If Apple replaced it, take it back and let them take care of it.
The battery is from a seller on Amazon - Husan to be exact. Here is the link.

They seem reliable from the reviews. This one sold me on the purchase. Luckily it seems like I have a year warranty and I think I either messed up by calibrating it or I just unfortunately got a bad one from the bunch they had.
 

leman

macrumors G4
Oct 14, 2008
10,699
5,201
From a seller on Amazon - Husan to be exact. Here is the link.
If it's an original battery, then it was most likely laying around in a storage for a while — and these batteries age, even if you don't use them. If its a knock-off unit, well, why are you even wondering?
 

anamboy

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 13, 2018
3
0
As others said you did more damage to your battery than anything else, give it a few charge cycles and see how it is by around 10 if it’s no better send it back.
Yes I plan to use it for a couple more cycles to see how it performs and I'll be returning if it stays bad. As of now, it actually jumped up to 91.1%.
[doublepost=1545148413][/doublepost]
No that is not necessary.
Thanks, late to the info but it's good to know now. BTW the battery was manufactured around April 14, 2018 - so about 8 months prior to the original posting.d
 

jerryk

macrumors 603
Nov 3, 2011
5,800
2,909
SF Bay Area
By use the system, you mean just use it as I normally would? I try to keep it on a charger and run the battery down to low (and not hibernate) once a month using battery guardian.
I would just use the machine as to do in your normal work. Do not run any programs or go through extra steps to try to improve battery life. Apple engineers has spent a lot of time instrumenting, and testing their system to learning how to manage battery life in all sort of conditions. It is unlikely 3rd party software developer is going to do better.
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.