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Apr 12, 2001
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Early this month Tim Cook sat down with Stephen Colbert for an interview and called movies made about Steve Jobs "opportunistic." Yesterday, during an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, screenwriter Aaron Sorkin issued a scathing response to Cook, saying "if you've got a factory full of children in China assembling phones for 17 cents an hour you've got a lot of nerve calling someone else opportunistic."


Today, during an interview with E! News, Sorkin walked back his comments, saying that both he and Cook went a little too far.
"You know what, I think that Tim Cook and I probably both went a little too far. And I apologize to Tim Cook. I hope when he sees the movie, he enjoys it as much as I enjoy his products."
Sorkin's Steve Jobs film, which stars Michael Fassbender as Jobs and Seth Rogen as Steve Wozniak will be released in New York and Los Angeles on October 9. The film will expand to more theaters on October 16 and open nationwide on October 23. Early reviews of Steve Jobs have called it "thrilling", with Oscar buzz surrounding the film.

The film is based on Walter Isaacson's best-selling biography, which Cook has said does a "tremendous disservice" to the Steve Jobs that he knew. The movie follows Jobs during three product launches, providing a behind-the-scenes look at how Jobs interacted with friends, colleagues and family.

Article Link: Aaron Sorkin Apologizes for Blasting Tim Cook's 'Opportunistic' Comment
 

spyguy10709

macrumors 6502a
Apr 5, 2010
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One Infinite Loop, Cupertino CA

dannys1

macrumors 68040
Sep 19, 2007
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UK
I listened to the Walter Issacson audiobook and ignoring the fact that the narrator was annoying and said "details" in the grating way, I did find it very unkind to Jobs. Not so much his personality or character where it was probably pretty accurate but that it made pretty much everything he did until the last few chapters sound like a failure. It was strange really, just super negative from the work point of view until the return.
 

makingdots

macrumors 6502
Aug 14, 2008
298
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Probably he got enlightened after he read macrumors' comments.

GFLPraxis said:
Wow, what a childish response.

Also, the people who make these sorts of accusations at Apple are absurd. Nintendo, Microsoft, and Sony manufacture the Playstation 4, Wii U, and XBox One at the same Foxconn factories. Dell and HP also manufacture their computers there.

Apple is the only one who publishes regular worker safety reports and does inspections and forces Foxconn to improve working conditions. They're by far the most responsible of every company in this list, so singling them out is ridiculous. It's an industry-wide issue that needs to be solved, not something Apple is doing.

The fact that this is Aaron Sorkin's view of the Foxconn situation makes it seem very unlikely to me that this will be an accurate film, if he buys in to media storylines like "the Apple factories".

macduke said:
Well that is patently false. Apple has done more than most any other tech company to monitor and reduce the problems inherent to Chinese factories that employ hundreds of thousands of workers. Workers who come there freely from their farms in the country because they can make a lot more money working in the factory for a while and then bring that money back to their home.
 
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GavinSharp

macrumors newbie
Jan 8, 2013
3
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Given the context of Cook's original comments, I'm pretty sure he was referring mostly to the "other" Steve Jobs movie (Steve Jobs: Man in the Machine). Colbert kind of asked him about both, but I think Tim was using his stock answer that may not apply quite as much to Sorkin's movie.
 

nagromme

macrumors G5
May 2, 2002
12,546
1,196
Maybe I'm too optimistic, but I always take a moment to tell anyone thank you when they walk back themselves in an argument or disagreement. I wish I saw it happen more often rather than watch people get entrenched once they've voiced an initial opinion.

Very true. Although what he did was walk back Tim's comment as well as his own, as if they were equivalent. But one comment was a very casual (and reasonable) opinion, about multiple for-profit movies, from someone whose friend died a couple years ago. The other was a quite blatant lie about a matter of factual record, and a very direct and UNreasonable attack against a man (and company) who has in fact done far more than the competition to keep children out of the workforce and get China to treat workers more fairly--while openly and publicly documenting the problems and the progress. And the apology failed to correct that lie, further cementing the damage when many believe it.
 
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justmewhoelse

macrumors newbie
Apr 1, 2015
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Early this month Tim Cook sat down with Stephen Colbert for an interview and called movies made about Steve Jobs "opportunistic." Yesterday, during an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, screenwriter Aaron Sorkin issued a scathing response to Cook, saying "if you've got a factory full of children in China assembling phones for 17 cents an hour you've got a lot of nerve calling someone else opportunistic."


Today, during an interview with E! News, Sorkin walked back his comments, saying that both he and Cook went a little too far.
Sorkin's Steve Jobs film, which stars Michael Fassbender as Jobs and Seth Rogen as Steve Wozniak will be released in New York and Los Angeles on October 9. The film will expand to more theaters on October 16 and open nationwide on October 23. Early reviews of Steve Jobs have called it "thrilling", with Oscar buzz surrounding the film.

The film is based on Walter Isaacson's best-selling biography, which Cook has said does a "tremendous disservice" to the Steve Jobs that he knew. The movie follows Jobs during three product launches, providing a behind-the-scenes look at how Jobs interacted with friends, colleagues and family.

Article Link: Aaron Sorkin Apologizes for Blasting Tim Cook's 'Opportunistic' Comment
So a pathetic Hollywood jerk, uses calling Tim Cook names to get self promotion for his crap movie. Yeah never have seen that before - invoke Jobs, Apple, Cook for headlines, click bait or whatever. But I'm sure Sorkin's mother likes his movie.
 
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AngerDanger

macrumors 603
Dec 9, 2008
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Opportunistic adj. exploiting chances offered by immediate circumstances without reference to a general plan or moral principle.

Yep, it's not like Sorkin generally writes screenplays about men in positions of power who struggle to balance ideas of merit with ones that appeal to a broad audience, often indulging in long-winded but rallying dissertations. He abruptly shifted gears from his standard romantic comedies and horror movies to work on this money-grab.

I hope Tim was talking about the Jobs movies that came out prior to Sorkin's
 

cdwilliams1

macrumors newbie
Oct 21, 2014
13
6
Plymouth, MN
I listened to the Walter Issacson audiobook and ignoring the fact that the narrator was annoying and said "details" in the grating way, I did find it very unkind to Jobs. Not so much his personality or character where it was probably pretty accurate but that it made pretty much everything he did until the last few chapters sound like a failure. It was strange really, just super negative from the work point of view until the return.


I agree, he really went out of his way to paint everything as negative so he could had a big redemption in the end. It was the classic film arc. Person finds early success, success goes to their head and they alienate everyone, do the walk of shame alone with the self introspection, and come back with a big splash and it turns out they were good all along, you just didn't know it. It really read like a typical Hollywood movie. Probably why it fit a film so well.
 

Lolito

macrumors 6502
Mar 20, 2013
397
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here
I think Sorkin was basically spot on on his first comment, I also think it was his only sincere comment, this second one is clearly steered by economic interests of a stronger source than his own self. Apple is the best example of efficient capitalism, planned obsolescence, and for sure, not green, at-all...

Well done Sorkin, and I´m looking forward to see this movie, which, good or bad, will be the Jobs biopic.
 
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KernelG

macrumors member
Feb 8, 2008
43
83
SF Bay Area, CA
I was with Sorkin on the first two points. I'll take his word that they aren't getting rich (relatively), and Tim probably should see the film before commenting on it. At point three, however, I decided not to see this film. His apology won't be headline news like the original, which only perpetuated the continued myth.

Maybe I'll tune in when it's on Netflix.
 

cdwilliams1

macrumors newbie
Oct 21, 2014
13
6
Plymouth, MN
I said this in the earlier thread about this movie but it's worth repeating. The only book that Woz, Tim Cook, and Steve Job's late wife agree is mostly accurate, is "Becoming Steve Jobs" - if you're looking for something to read. I grabbed it off Audible and enjoyed it. I also liked "Insanely Great" way back in the day. Everyone pretty much universally agrees that the PBS "Triumph of the Nerds" and the late "Pirates of Silicon Valley" are generally accurate too.
 

SgtPepper12

macrumors 6502a
Feb 1, 2011
688
639
Germany
Well, Sorkin clearly went a little further than Cook did. I guess he realized that very quickly, that's why he now tries to row back this badly. But when you think about it — accusing someone of opportunism who made a movie about a person who died a few years ago is not quite like accusing the CEO of a company of consciously employing children and exploiting poor people. It's actually a whole different book and as much as I think that this whole debate is childish, I think Sorkin deserves an appropriate response. He shouldn't have reacted to this at all. Makes him look really unprofessional.
 
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