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Adobe Debuts 'Wallaby' Prerelease Flash-to-HTML5 Converter

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Last October, Adobe demoed new conversion software that could allow Flash developers to port their content to a combination of HTML5 and related non-Flash technologies, making it considerably easier for developers to make their content available for platforms such as iOS that do not support Flash.

While at the time the conversion software was not promised for a public release, Adobe has now published a prerelease version of the technology known as "Wallaby".
"Wallaby" is the codename for an experimental technology that converts the artwork and animation contained in Adobe Flash Professional (FLA) files into HTML. This allows you to reuse and extend the reach of your content to devices that do not support the Flash runtimes. Once these files are converted to HTML, you can edit them with an HTML editing tool, such as Adobe Dreamweaver, or by hand if desired. You can view the output in one of the supported browsers or on an iOS device.
As detailed in the release notes, not all features are currently supported, but Adobe has clearly made significant progress in moving many basic Flash features such as buttons, fills, layers, and text to HTML. The current focus of Wallaby is on converting Flash-based banner ads to non-Flash, as that is one of the most-requested features with a rather straightforward implementation generally requiring only a subset of supported features.

Wallaby is currently available as a free download as Adobe seeks to gain feedback on its performance and utility. As refinements continue, the company will consider whether or not to include the functionality in future versions of Flash Professional.

Article Link: Adobe Debuts 'Wallaby' Prerelease Flash-to-HTML5 Converter
 

Cabbit

macrumors 68020
Jan 30, 2006
2,128
1
Scotland
This tool was demo'ed quite some time ago and is a natural progression of Flash (the development tool).

It will be great that some of the stuff that can only be easily done in Flash will be able to be output to standard cross browsers HTML without needing to be a expert in JavaScript, i look forward to seeing some of the new applications this will bring.

Though Flash is still unfortunately needed for DRM video and Web cam.
 
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mixel

macrumors 68000
Jan 12, 2006
1,701
926
Leeds, UK
TBH I'm a big fan of some of Adobe's products.. Flash CS is great for what it does. This is going to be REALLY nice for a lot of animators and so on..

As for whats in it for them, it makes a lot of sense to plug the gap before some competitor comes along with a valid flash replacement, causing pros to jump ship and learn a new system. Demand from Flash CS users must've made this a high priority feature.

I'm really happy they're doing this. :D
 
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57004

Cancelled
Aug 18, 2005
1,022
338
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!

I don't want those flash ads back!

Also I've never missed flash on my iPad for anything serious. Ever.
 
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camelsnot

macrumors 6502
Jan 31, 2011
293
0
I wonder what all of the Adobe apologists have to say about this.

nothing. It shows that Flash is still a viable option for web developers to develop content in a program they know, instead of using a perpetual HTML5 beta software (since HTML5 isn't fully approved yet). There are a lot more Flash and FLEX developers out there than there are HTML5 devs. Fact.

it's a win win for all sides. Of course, Apple may find a way to check HTML5 code on their devices for text such as 'developed with...' and make sure it doesn't work properly. I'm sure $teve Job$ isn't happy that Adobe found a way to still use Flash in a new environment. Poor fella has an inflated ego and a passion for hating competitors.
 
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Dragonlance1561

macrumors member
Aug 16, 2007
68
6
Installer gets an error at the end of installation, but the program is still installed. Then when you try to the program it attempts to install adobe air even if you already have it installed. (It gets suck with an empty progress bar installing adobe air.)

basically, it doesn't work.
 
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0815

macrumors 68000
Jul 9, 2010
1,754
884
here and there but not over there
I was hoping that it would take them longer for a tool like that - now it is a matter of time that the nice browsing experience on my iPad is getting destroyed by annoying html5 ads (I know it was only a matter of time - just had hopes that it takes longer) - guess there is no option of an HTML5 blocker :(
 
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err404

macrumors 68030
Mar 4, 2007
2,519
619
Exactly!

I can't see what's in it for Adobe. It's a tool to help everyone move off Flash!

The Flash Player is free. Adobe doesn't make any money off of the end user. Their bread and butter are the content creation tools. Releasing a converter like this increases the potential market that developers can reach via these tools. This ultimately makes the tools more valuable. It is a very smart move by Adobe, and it's good for the web overall since each platform can focus on optimizing open standards as opposed to relying on Adobe.

This is a Win for Adobe, Win for Flash developers, Win for end users, Win for OSS and a Win for browser developers.
 
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carmenodie

macrumors 6502a
Apr 25, 2008
775
0
How much resource is needed to complete this conversion?
I say fail but we'll see won't we?
 
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spotlight07

macrumors regular
Mar 28, 2007
131
69
This is really great news! Flash has had a few underlying languages over the years, so why not HTML5. Flash could be a tool that saves a lot of development time for HTML5 apps in the future, looking forward to it.
 
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troop231

macrumors 603
Jan 20, 2010
5,733
447
Wallaby?
 
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billyjoegibsonx

macrumors 6502
Sep 10, 2008
419
0
Exactly!

I can't see what's in it for Adobe. It's a tool to help everyone move off Flash!

I agree. Seems quite silly...Flash to HTML5. Why bother write it all in Flash then convert it to HTML5? Why not just learn HTML5, it's obvious Flash's time is coming to an end. HTML5 isn't that complicated either...Well IMO it's easier to learn than Flash.

R.I.P Flash. I won't miss you.
 
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Rodimus Prime

macrumors G4
Oct 9, 2006
10,136
4
Does this mean they are taking Apples side in the great WebM H264 War?

Umm this has nothing to do with h264. Flash was always a lot more than video. A lot of web sites were designed completely in flash and it could do a lot of thing Javascript just well could not do.

The white flag of surrender in the Flash wars?

Umm no I think it is just the natural progression and Adobe knew that HTML5 was the next step. But HTML5 has a long ways to go to do everything flash can do.
Remember flash is a lot more than just video.
 
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stationstops

macrumors member
Apr 30, 2010
38
0
Does this mean they are taking Apples side in the great WebM H264 War?

That's a different war iOS and Adobe were on the same side of - both have supported H.264 before the iPhone was even released.

What iOS doesn't support are the actual flash *players* which deliver H.264 content, or the non-video applications authored in Flash (and the legacy flv video format, which any sane content provider abandoned long ago).

To be completely honest, I think Adobe wants to move to HTML5 anyway - not today, but moving forward, its probably going to be less work for them to maintain authoring tools which support a standard, rather than having to do both sides and fight for relevance.

On the plus side, HTML5 has jack right now for high-quality application development tools (how many HTML5 applications do you have installed on your iPhone or iPad? GMail maybe?) This is Adobe's strong suit, so I'm looking forward to them moving forward with HTML5...
 
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firestarter

macrumors 603
Dec 31, 2002
5,504
133
Green and pleasant land
The Flash Player is free. Adobe doesn't make any money off of the end user. Their bread and butter are the content creation tools. Releasing a converter like this increases the potential market that developers can reach via these tools. This ultimately makes the tools more valuable. It is a very smart move by Adobe, and it's good for the web overall since each platform can focus on optimizing open standards as opposed to relying on Adobe.

I agree that Adobe can make money on content creation tools in the short term - but weaning people off flash can't be good for them in the long term. In a post-flash market, Adobe will have more competition creating HTML5 tools.

No - Adobe is doing this because they have to, not because they really want to.
 
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goobot

macrumors 603
Jun 26, 2009
5,868
2,805
long island NY
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_2_1 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8C148 Safari/6533.18.5)

If you guys hate ads so much just jb and buy the adblocker for a few bucks.
 
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