Become a MacRumors Supporter for $25/year with no ads, private forums, and more!

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
55,455
17,794



224251-box_flash_cs5_150x150.jpg


Responding to Apple's announcement that it is easing a number of restrictions on App Store app development including the use of third-party development tools, Adobe has indicated that it will resume work on its Packager for iPhone tool in Flash Professional CS5 that allows developers to export their Flash projects in native iOS format.
Apple's announcement today that it has lifted restrictions on its third-party developer guidelines has direct implications for Adobe's Packager for iPhone, a feature in the Flash Professional CS5 authoring tool. This feature was created to enable Flash developers to quickly and easily deliver applications for iOS devices. The feature is available for developers to use today in Flash Professional CS5, and we will now resume development work on this feature for future releases.
While Packager for iPhone is already included in Flash Professional CS5, Adobe had previously announced that it would cease work on the project in the face of Apple's prohibition against its usage in creating applications for submission to the App Store.

Adobe also notes that developers who have used Packager for iPhone to create native iOS applications from Flash projects are already seeing their applications being approved by Apple for inclusion in the App Store.

Article Link: Adobe to Resume Work on Flash-to-iPhone Compiler
 

SkippyThorson

macrumors 68000
Jul 22, 2007
1,592
791
Utica, NY
Hmm. So does this mean that Apple and Adobe are getting along again? Or does this just mean that Apple is going to shoot them down in the near future?
 

gwangung

macrumors 65816
Apr 9, 2003
1,111
88
Hmm. So does this mean that Apple and Adobe are getting along again? Or does this just mean that Apple is going to shoot them down in the near future?

I suspect that this was always meant as a breathing space for Apple to establish the merits of iOS multi-tasking. Releasing 4.x anywhere close to Adobe Flash would confuse people as to what exactly is slowing down an iPhone...
 

dwenaus

macrumors newbie
Nov 15, 2009
3
0
all apple has to do is disable this one more time, then enable it again, to really confuse developers who want to use flash and still avoid the scrutiny of the govt. smart move apple. poor ol' crummy flash.
 

kenman884

macrumors member
Apr 4, 2010
40
0
All they really have to do is enforce a policy of requiring the compiler to be up-to-date and not break functionality, and eventually Flash will kill itself for them.
 

rudigern

macrumors member
Apr 20, 2010
73
100
A sad day

As an native App developer this is a sad day. I've tried the Apps that have been created in Flash and it produces a sub-par Application with poor touch response and low fps. I have no problems with the other compilers though.
 

faroZ06

macrumors 68040
Apr 3, 2009
3,387
1
Wow...

I was thinking, "WOOT! Second to comment!" but then a bunch of comments came up :confused: :confused:

Anyway, wasn't Adobe "moving on" from Apple?

Agh, let's hope Apple doesn't let this one go past them. There shouldn't be Flash apps on the iPhone slowing it down. Maybe Flash apps will get a little "FLASH" sticker on it to warn users :D
 

faroZ06

macrumors 68040
Apr 3, 2009
3,387
1
Droid users want Flash and say that having Flash is better than not having it because you get to play games. First of all, you can't even use the keyboard in Flash for Droid :confused: so how is that useful for games??? And if their OS actually had developers, it would have more game apps anyway.

In the mean time Flash would only be loading ads :mad: assumming its "Hit and Miss" Flash actually works.
 

PeterQVenkman

macrumors 68020
Mar 4, 2005
2,023
0
Unsurprising! Now get ready for a flood of crappy “native” (AIR) apps on the App Store. :(

Yes, nothing was in place to stop the flood of crappy native apps, either. How will we ever survive?


As an native App developer this is a sad day. I've tried the Apps that have been created in Flash and it produces a sub-par Application with poor touch response and low fps.

If you're a good developer then you have nothing to worry about from sub-par apps, native or otherwise.
 

faroZ06

macrumors 68040
Apr 3, 2009
3,387
1
Yes, nothing was in place to stop the flood of crappy native apps, either. How will we ever survive?

The App Store is surprisingly safe. Almost none of the apps there are trashy and crashy. My complaint is that many apps say that they work on iPod Touch or some older iPhone model but they don't :mad: :confused:
 

ImageWrangler

macrumors regular
Apr 28, 2007
133
2
upstate New York
I second the above "lol, flash."

Great, so those pitiful clinging to archaic technology developers can potentially get their bloatware on the iPhone then party like it's 1999? 1999 because that was when Flash peaked for being relevant and it's been dropping away ever since.

I won awards for Flash stuff many moons ago, it was frustratingly craptacular back in the day and clunky but did what it had to do, but it's time is past. It's not ADA compliant. It's a drain and a resource hog. It's not even necessarily for 99% of the things any competent and in-the-now developer does, it's definitely not future proof so any developer coder that's using it is just screaming "I'm stuck in the past, afraid of change, and a dinosaur (not to mention unemployable in five years)." Dragging the modern web down by their ignorance doesn't give someone a right, only a sad excuse. Flash needs to take a long walk on a short plank and join the list of "technologies of yore that were outmoded" museum where it belongs, not continue to blight the web.
 

PeterQVenkman

macrumors 68020
Mar 4, 2005
2,023
0
Great, so those pitiful clinging to archaic technology developers can potentially get their bloatware on the iPhone then party like it's 1999? 1999 because that was when Flash peaked for being relevant and it's been dropping away ever since.

I think your years are off a bit, but OK.

I won awards for Flash stuff many moons ago, it was frustratingly craptacular back in the day and clunky but did what it had to do, but it's time is past. It's not ADA compliant.

It's not compliant with the American Dental Association? ;)


It's a drain and a resource hog.

On the mac.

And I suppose it also sucks on Android, but then you can choose to activate it, or choose to install it or not. Remember that?

Choice?


UnseenLlama said:
All Apple did was throw Adobe a lifeline. Maybe they will learn this time to keep up with whatever changes may happen.

You are missing the bigger picture. Apple finally woke up and smelled the coffee when they saw "Epic Citadel" and Rage running on the iPhone. Say what you want about Adobe, because lord knows they've earned plenty of the crap they're taking, but this is about getting people the right tools to do the right job.

That's ID Tech 5, Unreal, and Unity. The tools real game developers use to make the best games!
 

killmoms

macrumors 68040
Jun 23, 2003
3,729
19
Durham, NC
And I suppose it also sucks on Android, but then you can choose to activate it, or choose to install it or not. Remember that?

Choice?

Apple’s never been that concerned with choice—only if it enhances the experience. If they think a choice will detract too much, they won’t implement it until the balance changes.
 

SPUY767

macrumors 68020
Jun 22, 2003
2,029
113
GA
If you're a good developer then you have nothing to worry about from sub-par apps, native or otherwise.

That's not entirely accurate. On a device with limited resources, e.g. a phone, the language and tools used are extremely important. You can get away with being a crappy programmer on a platform with seemingly infinite resources, by comparison, e.g. a PC. This is why there are no worthwhile JIT compiled languages that run well on phones. Java ran OK, but the apps that it was running weren't exactly earth shattering, but I'd love to see someone attempt Epic Citadel in a JIT language.
 

Eddyisgreat

macrumors 601
Oct 24, 2007
4,851
1
lets see. Days (or weeks) after Apple opened up hardware decoding, flash was updated to support it on the newest hardware (as defined by Apple).

Then Apple changes up the app store restrictions and the same day Adobe heats up this project?

Hmmmm.....I wonder who is dragging their feet?
 

zarusoba

macrumors 6502
Feb 3, 2006
321
0
Australia
If Flash-made apps are inherently inferior to those coded natively, won't the bad reviews kill the market for those apps?
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.