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KdParker

macrumors 601
Oct 1, 2010
4,793
998
Everywhere
From what I see, a big problem with iPad sales is that the old iPads are too good. I don't know anyone with an original iPad, but several people with an iPad 2 who are going to use it until it falls apart, and that's when they will buy a new one.

Absolutely true. I most of the iPad 2 users i know just don't need to upgrade yet.
 

MasterRyu2011

macrumors 65816
Aug 22, 2014
1,064
359
That really depends - is it not innovative because it's not first to market? I think a large part of the reason there are so many "incomplete" smart watches on the market at the moment is that they were rushed out to beat Apple - there have been rumours that Apple has been working on a watch for years.

The same thing happened with the iPad. It was in development before the iPhone even, but wasn't released until they felt it was ready.

Whether "smart watch" and "tablet computer" are really innovative in the first place (first to market or otherwise) is a separate exercise.

If Apple releases the watch and it manages to do everything right then I would argue that it's ultimately an innovative product. It's not easy to make it work - specifically the UI and power seem to be the problem. If you can crack those, then you can argue innovation.

I'm not 100% sold, but we'll see what they come up with. I think it's telling that we haven't heard a lot about battery life from Apple directly.

Point taken. If Apple can reliably implement a solar charging solution in the same form factor, that would be a game changer.
 

paul4339

macrumors 65816
Sep 14, 2009
1,450
733
...
The Apple Watch also is expected to command interest in 2015 with 3 million units shipped during the first quarter of availability, predicts Huberty. Surveys suggest the wearable will be popular among iPhone owners, pushing sales to a predicted 30 million units in 2015. ...

3 million in first quarter of availability ramping to a possible 30 million for 2015?
That's quite a ramp up!
 

IJ Reilly

macrumors P6
Jul 16, 2002
17,909
1,496
Palookaville
From what I see, a big problem with iPad sales is that the old iPads are too good. I don't know anyone with an original iPad, but several people with an iPad 2 who are going to use it until it falls apart, and that's when they will buy a new one.

You do know someone with an original iPad. Me. I handed it down to the spousal unit when I got a Retina. They are both still in daily use.

Anyway, not disagreeing with the reasoning, just pointing out the MR spin. The decline is significant, not slight.
 

BornAgainMac

macrumors 604
Feb 4, 2004
7,302
5,311
Florida Resident
I have upgraded to every new iPad model except for the iPad 2 Air. In addition, I am using my Mac more than my iPad. I am using the iPad for what it does good at and stopped trying to use it like a Mac/PC replacement. Post PC era my ass.
 

coolfactor

macrumors 604
Jul 29, 2002
7,165
9,927
Vancouver, BC
Where's the industry-leading Mac Pro upgrade? Or have sales not justified keeping that new Mac current? Or are the processors not yet available or affordable enough to keep their margins healthy? Lots of questions...
 

xVeinx

macrumors 6502
Oct 9, 2006
361
0
California
The iPhone already is a major player as a 'hub' device (see the Mac as a hub idea ala Steve Jobs), at least in the US. While more important innovations will appear, the effect of shrinking the main computing device that people have means that accessory devices can interact with that mobile hub--hence in part the "internet of things." Apple may make some of these devices, but it's more important for them to have the 'platform' of choice right now than it is to release the next big tech innovation. The more people they can attract to the ecosystem, the more disruptive the new innovations can be.
 

coolfactor

macrumors 604
Jul 29, 2002
7,165
9,927
Vancouver, BC
I have upgraded to every new iPad model except for the iPad 2 Air. In addition, I am using my Mac more than my iPad. I am using the iPad for what it does good at and stopped trying to use it like a Mac/PC replacement. Post PC era my ass.

I agreed with everything until that last remark. The Post PC era doesn't need to mean the personal computer needs to die out completely or become inconsequential. It just means that a new form factor takes the limelight, which is exactly what has happened.
 

paul4339

macrumors 65816
Sep 14, 2009
1,450
733
You cannot call it innovative if it comes out with the same core features as the current smart watches already out today. It may well be a disruptor though since it's Apple, and people will line up in droves to buy it regardless of what other competing products are out there.

you don't need to be the first to be innovative. (innovation is not the same as invention). I think digital crown and force touch is quite innovative.

If you look from a tech enthusiasts eye, the iPad (and iPod) wasn't innovative either.

But from the avg consumer perspective it was very innovative (it was new to them and added lots of unique value). This value was reflected by the market disruption that occur shortly after (shift in consumer spending and resulting reaction by electronics makers).

the iPad and iPod were SJ products, I still don't see how Tim Cook isn't following the Apple way.
 

MacCruiskeen

macrumors 6502
Nov 9, 2011
321
5
Absolutely true. I most of the iPad 2 users i know just don't need to upgrade yet.

My wife has an iPad 2 and I have a 3rd gen iPad. For what we use them for, they still work well enough. A newer one would be lighter and faster, but the difference just isn't enough to be worth spending a lot of money for. I ordinarily wait for hardware to die before replacing it anyway, but this is definitely true for the iPad.
 

HobeSoundDarryl

macrumors G5
I wonder how much of the amount of people sticking with the 4S and older has to do with people not wanting to get giant phones

I wonder if it's more of iPhones <6 being "good enough"... that the tangible new hardware features of 6 are not compelling enough to motivate some with iPhones <6 to take on a new contract and or lay out the full price to replace one off contract.

Personally, I see the bigger screens as a huge draw (pardon the play on words) for the masses, meaning I suspect many of those who are clinging to old models are not turned off by the bigger screens. Instead, I think it's just that unless ApplePay is a big draw, the <6 iPhone one already has will still run every app, still display the very same home screen, still make every call, still text just as well, still ________________ as well or close to it. If one doesn't burn for a bigger screen and/or ApplePay, they may see their <6 iPhone as "good enough" and await the 6s or 7.

It does seem inevitable that iPhone will eventually reach a point where the pull to upgrade will slow down as added utility (of new hardware features) becomes increasingly nichey. Maybe the crowd sticking with <6 iPhones are satisfied with their bundle of benefits "as is"? Or they just don't want a new contract or to lay out so much money for an unlocked one just so they can buy other things with Apple Pay and/or use modestly-larger screens?
 

Col4bin

macrumors 68000
Oct 2, 2011
1,904
1,596
El Segundo
No real surprise here considering the incredible iPhone 6/6+ demand. There were so many iPhone upgraders and Android deserters who were just waiting for Apple to release larger screened phones. Thank you Apple, my iP6 was certainly worth the wait. :D

----------

Absolutely true. I most of the iPad 2 users i know just don't need to upgrade yet.

Still rocking my iPad 2. With iOS 7 installed, it definitely lags, but is otherwise still totally usable.
 

0007776

Suspended
Jul 11, 2006
6,473
8,170
Somewhere
I wonder if it's more of iPhones <6 being "good enough"... that the tangible new hardware features of 6 are not compelling enough to motivate some with iPhones <6 to take on a new contract and or lay out the full price to replace one off contract.

Personally, I see the bigger screens as a huge draw (pardon the play on words) for the masses, meaning I suspect many of those who are clinging to old models are not turned off by the bigger screens. Instead, I think it's just that unless ApplePay is a big draw, the <6 iPhone one already has will still run every app, still display the very same home screen, still make every call, still text just as well, still ________________ as well or close to it. If one doesn't burn for a bigger screen and/or ApplePay, they may see their <6 iPhone as "good enough" and await the 6s or 7.

It does seem inevitable that iPhone will eventually reach a point where the pull to upgrade will slow down as added utility (of new hardware features) becomes increasingly nichey. Maybe the crowd sticking with <6 iPhones are satisfied with their bundle of benefits "as is"? Or they just don't want a new contract or to lay out so much money for an unlocked one just so they can buy other things with Apple Pay and/or use modestly-larger screens?

That is certainly possible, as smartphones have evolved they do seem to be getting to a point where most any phone will work well enough for your average user. Sure there are features on high end phones that are nice, but phones aren't loosing their usefulness anywhere near as soon as they used to.
 

thekeyring

macrumors 68040
Jan 5, 2012
3,485
2,147
London
I'm starting to wonder whether they'll be able to top these numbers. Not that it means they're doomed if they don't - it can't go up forever.

Just I wonder if this means they've peaked. Then again, a lot of people seem disappointed with the specs. the iPhone 5S was 200% faster than the iPhone 5, and the iPhone 6 is only 25% faster than the iPhone 5S.

So maybe the 6S outsell the iPhone 6 because it will ship with double the RAM, a much, much faster processor, a much better camera, etc.
 

oneshotpro

Suspended
Aug 13, 2014
192
92
I upgraded from a 4s to a 5s. Actually, I think this will be my last iPhone as Tim Cook seems to have a problem with white males as customers and in general, so looking at alternatives next time for sure.
 

IJ Reilly

macrumors P6
Jul 16, 2002
17,909
1,496
Palookaville
I upgraded from a 4s to a 5s. Actually, I think this will be my last iPhone as Tim Cook seems to have a problem with white males as customers and in general, so looking at alternatives next time for sure.

Yes, clearly Tim Cook is a product of self-loathing.

Never more deserved: :roll eyes:
 

proline

macrumors 6502a
Nov 18, 2012
630
1
You cannot call it innovative if it comes out with the same core features as the current smart watches already out today. It may well be a disruptor though since it's Apple, and people will line up in droves to buy it regardless of what other competing products are out there.
LOL. The same junk people said about how the iPhone had the same 'core features' as every other phone at the time, minus the keyboard, camera, 3G, and stylus. I love how some people can't learn from history and spend their lives repeating it.
 

Four oF NINE

macrumors 68000
Sep 28, 2011
1,931
896
Hell's Kitchen
I wonder how much of the amount of people sticking with the 4S and older has to do with people not wanting to get giant phones and the record sales are from people switching from android now that they can get their phablets on iOS?

I know if my 4S hadn't died I would still be on it, as it is I switched to android to get a smaller screen than the 6 or 6+. So I wonder if those on the 4S will really upgrade to newer iPhones in as large of numbers as these analysts predict...

As much as I liked my 4S, by the time the 5S was released, I was ready for an upgrade due to battery life improvements. The larger screen size of the 5S vs the 4S is nominal.

I'll be getting the 6S if they continue the naming strategy, but I won't be getting the plus version, I have the iPad for bigger screen size.

Now when I get an incoming phone call at home, my iPhone, iPad, and MacBook all ring, and I can answer on any device.
 

Rogifan

macrumors Penryn
Nov 14, 2011
24,379
31,618
I'm starting to wonder whether they'll be able to top these numbers. Not that it means they're doomed if they don't - it can't go up forever.

Just I wonder if this means they've peaked. Then again, a lot of people seem disappointed with the specs. the iPhone 5S was 200% faster than the iPhone 5, and the iPhone 6 is only 25% faster than the iPhone 5S.

So maybe the 6S outsell the iPhone 6 because it will ship with double the RAM, a much, much faster processor, a much better camera, etc.

So basically Apple is doomed if they don't have a record quarter and doomed if they do (because they'll never be able top it). So under what scenario would Apple not be doomed?
 

filmantopia

macrumors 6502a
Feb 5, 2010
861
2,484
Isn't Apple Watch innovative and a possible disruptor?

No, no-- you should only be hating on Apple products before they're released-- then tepid and complaining about their features once they're released. Only several years later should you describe them as revolutionary and game changing, in contrast to Apple's *next* product which you should definitely hate on.

----------

LOL. The same junk people said about how the iPhone had the same 'core features' as every other phone at the time, minus the keyboard, camera, 3G, and stylus. I love how some people can't learn from history and spend their lives repeating it.

Yeah, observing this cycle of people reacting to Apple releases has really helped me understand the whole of humanity in the depth of their cluelessness, in a microcosm.
 

Daalseth

macrumors 6502a
Jun 16, 2012
599
306
Looking ahead, Huberty believes Apple is on the cusp of a "super" iPhone upgrade cycle that will see an increased number of iPhone owners upgrading from their older iPhone models.

That will likely include me. ApplePay is the "Killer App" that's likely going to prompt me to jump. The only quesdtions are A: When will it come to Canada. and B: How long will it take me to convince SWMBO to let me get one.
 
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