Android Smartphones Expected to Follow iPhone With Ultra Wideband Technology Starting Later This Year

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Following in the footsteps of the iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro, the first Android smartphones with Ultra Wideband technology will be released starting later in 2020, according to Barclays analysts.

In a research note obtained by MacRumors, the analysts said Android smartphones will be equipped with an all-in-one Ultra Wideband, NFC, and Secure Element chip introduced by Dutch chipmaker NXP Semiconductors last year. It is unclear which Android smartphones will adopt Ultra Wideband first, but Samsung did join a consortium with NXP last year to help develop the technology.

iPhone 11 lineup features Ultra Wideband technology

In a press release last year, NXP said Ultra Wideband will give mobile devices several new and interesting capabilities, such as being able to unlock a car's doors when the device comes in close proximity of the vehicle, potentially foreshadowing a feature that could come to the iPhone down the road.

"With the SR100T, mobile devices will be able to communicate with connected doors, points of entry, and cars to open them once approaching," said NXP in a press release. "Lights, audio speakers, and any other connected device with UWB sensing capability will be able to follow users from one room to another, and smart connected technology will intuitively be embedded in people's lives."

iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max models are equipped with an Apple-designed U1 chip with Ultra Wideband, allowing the devices to understand their precise location relative to other nearby U1-equipped Apple devices. On iOS 13, for example, there is a directional AirDrop feature where you can point an iPhone 11 at another iPhone user to instantly share files with them.

On its iPhone 11 Pro page, Apple teases that the directional AirDrop feature is "just the beginning" of what is possible with Ultra Wideband, adding that "amazing new capabilities" are coming later.

Last year, MacRumors uncovered evidence of Apple working on Tile-like item trackers in iOS 13 code. The so-called AirTags will also support Ultra Wideband, according to analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, suggesting that iPhone 11 models will be able to locate the tags with precise accuracy in both indoor and outdoor areas.

MacRumors exclusive: Find My app with hidden "Items" tab for AirTags

The distance between two Ultra Wideband devices can be measured precisely by calculating the time that it takes for a radio wave to pass between the two devices, with much more accuracy than Bluetooth LE and Wi-Fi.

It is unclear when Apple plans to announce its item tracking tags, or if development of the product has been abandoned.

In any case, it appears that Ultra Wideband really is just getting started.

Article Link: Android Smartphones Expected to Follow iPhone With Ultra Wideband Technology Starting Later This Year
 
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ericinboston

macrumors 68000
Jan 13, 2008
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202
I hope it's not abandoned and I sure hope this also comes to the Apple Watch. I would love to be able to open doors and unlock my car with my Apple Watch.
Right. Because the way we've been unlocking car doors the past 90 years is difficult. </sarcasm>

I, for one, have absolutely no need for this garbage. Others may. It's just more mishmosh and junk to manage as I constantly need to upgrade iOS and then the app...or I can't update the app without updating iOS (I've had this problem with bank apps and I stopped using them). Then the battery (on the other device) dies or needs charging. Blah blah blah.

What's next? Flush the toilet from my iPhone using the free iFlush app with ads? It's easy! Just swipe open your phone with your dirty finger, tap the iFlush app with your other dirty finger, watch the 15 second ad about 1/2 price colonoscopy screenings in your area, then choose which toilet you want to flush, then hold down the "drop" icon for 4 seconds to flush urine or hold down the "log" icon for 9 seconds to flush fecal matter. You can also spend $5.99 to rid the ads and be able to shake your iPhone 4 times for urine or 9 times for fecal.
 

MoreRumors?

macrumors 6502a
Feb 28, 2018
820
604
I know if it will narrow and locate lost devices more precisely, i.e. Airpod, that would be welcomed. I had no success in locating one of the earpiece in my home and had to buy a replacement.
 

dannyyankou

macrumors G3
Mar 2, 2012
8,720
12,952
Scarsdale, NY
bringing ultimate laziness one step closer. Technology at its finest. It's just so hard to flip a switch or turn a key with that thing on the end of your arm called a hand
Completely unfair to equate convenience with laziness. Why don’t we just go back to manual car keys where you have to turn it to unlock it? Or car windows you have to wind down?
 

benshive

macrumors 6502
Feb 26, 2017
399
3,092
United States
bringing ultimate laziness one step closer. Technology at its finest. It's just so hard to flip a switch or turn a key with that thing on the end of your arm called a hand
"People these days are so lazy!! We used to have to get up and walk over to the TV to change the channel!"

"My flip phone from 2007 can make a phone call. What do I need all of these other fancy schmancy features for?!"

Sorry, it's not a matter of laziness. Just because I think it'd be cool if my phone could automatically unlock my car door when I approach it doesn't mean I wouldn't be willing to use a key.
 
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bbednarz

macrumors 65816
Nov 16, 2017
1,266
3,010
Chicago
Right. Because the way we've been unlocking car doors the past 90 years is difficult. </sarcasm>

I, for one, have absolutely no need for this garbage. Others may. It's just more mishmosh and junk to manage as I constantly need to upgrade iOS and then the app...or I can't update the app without updating iOS (I've had this problem with bank apps and I stopped using them). Then the battery (on the other device) dies or needs charging. Blah blah blah.

What's next? Flush the toilet from my iPhone using the free iFlush app with ads? It's easy! Just swipe open your phone with your dirty finger, tap the iFlush app with your other dirty finger, watch the 15 second ad about 1/2 price colonoscopy screenings in your area, then choose which toilet you want to flush, then hold down the "drop" icon for 4 seconds to flush urine or hold down the "log" icon for 9 seconds to flush fecal matter. You can also spend $5.99 to rid the ads and be able to shake your iPhone 4 times for urine or 9 times for fecal.
Yep, lets never advance technology because the way we have done things is good enough. Heck, why even bother with the iPhone just go back to your corded phone at home.
 

Pupi

macrumors 6502
Apr 12, 2015
298
431
Right. Because the way we've been unlocking car doors the past 90 years is difficult. </sarcasm>

I, for one, have absolutely no need for this garbage. Others may. It's just more mishmosh and junk to manage as I constantly need to upgrade iOS and then the app...or I can't update the app without updating iOS (I've had this problem with bank apps and I stopped using them). Then the battery (on the other device) dies or needs charging. Blah blah blah.

What's next? Flush the toilet from my iPhone using the free iFlush app with ads? It's easy! Just swipe open your phone with your dirty finger, tap the iFlush app with your other dirty finger, watch the 15 second ad about 1/2 price colonoscopy screenings in your area, then choose which toilet you want to flush, then hold down the "drop" icon for 4 seconds to flush urine or hold down the "log" icon for 9 seconds to flush fecal matter. You can also spend $5.99 to rid the ads and be able to shake your iPhone 4 times for urine or 9 times for fecal.
That seems needlessly cynical. The way we've been unlocking car doors isn't difficult but requires a physical key that can get lost, stolen, forgotten, etc. Digitalizing more and more of our daily objects like keys, cards, IDs into the devices we use everyday, especially the phone, reduces clutter, increases convenience and safety. Do you also hate Apple Pay?




-----
That aside, shouldn't Apple have built UWB into AirPods Pro case at least? AirPods tracking isn't worth a damn and yet they are working on small tracking tags lol.
 

jdclifford

macrumors 6502
Jul 26, 2011
432
581
Right. Because the way we've been unlocking car doors the past 90 years is difficult. </sarcasm>

I, for one, have absolutely no need for this garbage. Others may. It's just more mishmosh and junk to manage as I constantly need to upgrade iOS and then the app...or I can't update the app without updating iOS (I've had this problem with bank apps and I stopped using them). Then the battery (on the other device) dies or needs charging. Blah blah blah.

What's next? Flush the toilet from my iPhone using the free iFlush app with ads? It's easy! Just swipe open your phone with your dirty finger, tap the iFlush app with your other dirty finger, watch the 15 second ad about 1/2 price colonoscopy screenings in your area, then choose which toilet you want to flush, then hold down the "drop" icon for 4 seconds to flush urine or hold down the "log" icon for 9 seconds to flush fecal matter. You can also spend $5.99 to rid the ads and be able to shake your iPhone 4 times for urine or 9 times for fecal.
First use iWipe THEN use iFlush.
 

Jason2000

macrumors member
Jul 19, 2019
38
58
Planet Earth
bringing ultimate laziness one step closer. Technology at its finest. It's just so hard to flip a switch or turn a key with that thing on the end of your arm called a hand
What a clueless comment. I guess you would rather wind your car up to start it like the old days. Just because technology makes something easier does not automatically make you lazy for using it. It does make you lazy when you make a baseless comment like you did without first thinking about it.
 

Northern Man

macrumors 6502a
Aug 25, 2013
691
963
That seems needlessly cynical. The way we've been unlocking car doors isn't difficult but requires a physical key that can get lost, stolen, forgotten, etc. Digitalizing more and more of our daily objects like keys, cards, IDs into the devices we use everyday, especially the phone, reduces clutter, increases convenience and safety. Do you also hate Apple Pay?
-----
That aside, shouldn't Apple have built UWB into AirPods Pro case at least? AirPods tracking isn't worth a damn and yet they are working on small tracking tags lol.
...and people don't lose phones?
 
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Unregistered 4U

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Jul 22, 2002
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ericinboston

macrumors 68000
Jan 13, 2008
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That seems needlessly cynical. The way we've been unlocking car doors isn't difficult but requires a physical key that can get lost, stolen, forgotten, etc. Digitalizing more and more of our daily objects like keys, cards, IDs into the devices we use everyday, especially the phone, reduces clutter, increases convenience and safety.
1)Most cars have had alternative to physical keys for at least 30 years. Keyfobs have been extremely popular for past 15 years. Back in the 80s there were several American cars that used keycodes on the door handle.

2)I'm not against technology. But my iPhone/Watch can get lost, stolen, fogotten, etc. too! It can also get corrupted. Apps can (and as I provided with my banking apps) and WILL stop working until you upgrade the app. Oh, don't forget to upgrade iOS (which will very likely force you to upgrade some other apps as well as change/break something else) so the new app can be downloaded in the first place. Don't forget to register your car/id/home address/email/phone/license plate/etc for "safety" in case there's ever a problem and/or you need technical support. Do think maybe...just maybe...it would be somehow beneficial to the app creator (or Apple) to know that you live in zip code 06498 and drive a 2019 BMW 5-class automobile and usually unlock your car every weekday at 8:15am, lock it at 8:55am, unlock it again at 5:05pm, and lock it again at 6:15pm? And then you wonder why your phone magically rings at 6:20pm every night trying to sell you 3rd party car insurance as you barely got your coat off and hugged the kids?

3)You really want to throw in the "increases safety" line? Really? Every company in the USA has used that line for decades whether they are selling me technology or flowers. Seriously. And each and every time I ask them "how?" and far often they can't explain it. Ask your bank the next time how their policy against you depositing money into your son's account is increasing safety. They have no answer, yet they loudly promote it.


My point is that the iPhone (or whatever comes next) is trying to be the central hub for 100% of everything you do/touch in your physical life. This may not be directly responsible by Apple, but the quest is there to do it. The problem with this general "hub" is that it has so, So, SO many dependencies (some of which I listed) and in addition to the dependencies come opportunities for things to fail.

The keyfob that came with my car (and yes I have to replace that stupid battery every 16 months) works just fine thank you very much.
 

konqerror

macrumors 65816
Dec 31, 2013
1,316
2,235
Right. Because the way we've been unlocking car doors the past 90 years is difficult. </sarcasm>
The fact is that carmakers really pushed proximity car unlock after GM killed 124 people with their too-limp ignition switch, and Chrysler recalled around 1 Million cars due to issues like people hitting the switch with their knee. So it was really a way to prevent people from dying. They have more confidence in making 1 piece of safety-critical software versus millions of mechanical switches with tolerances. This is also on top of a number of ignition-switch related fires that have resulted in recalls in decades past.

A secondary factor is European and Australian requirements for electronic keys/immobilizers, since the vehicle theft rate is much higher there than North America. While the European immobilzer mandate has been around for over a decade, keyless entry pushes electronic security to the entry doors.
 
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Harthag

macrumors 65816
Jun 20, 2009
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I hope it's not abandoned and I sure hope this also comes to the Apple Watch. I would love to be able to open doors and unlock my car with my Apple Watch.
Apple Watch has a Toyota app and can remote lock / unlock / start / stop my car independent of my iPhone (as long as the watch is connected to wifi or cellular). Didn't know I could do it from my watch, just tried it for kicks, cool.
 

wigby

macrumors 68000
Jun 7, 2007
1,845
1,313
Right. Because the way we've been unlocking car doors the past 90 years is difficult. </sarcasm>

I, for one, have absolutely no need for this garbage. Others may. It's just more mishmosh and junk to manage as I constantly need to upgrade iOS and then the app...or I can't update the app without updating iOS (I've had this problem with bank apps and I stopped using them). Then the battery (on the other device) dies or needs charging. Blah blah blah.

What's next? Flush the toilet from my iPhone using the free iFlush app with ads? It's easy! Just swipe open your phone with your dirty finger, tap the iFlush app with your other dirty finger, watch the 15 second ad about 1/2 price colonoscopy screenings in your area, then choose which toilet you want to flush, then hold down the "drop" icon for 4 seconds to flush urine or hold down the "log" icon for 9 seconds to flush fecal matter. You can also spend $5.99 to rid the ads and be able to shake your iPhone 4 times for urine or 9 times for fecal.
If you have an iPhone and use it regularly, you are already doing so many things and relying on it constantly. Why draw the line at unlocking things?
 

Pupi

macrumors 6502
Apr 12, 2015
298
431
...and people don't lose phones?
People do lose phones but the idea is that, on one hand, another person can't get access to your things if they get your phone, since it's locked and secured to you with a passcode/password/biometry etc. On the other hand you more or less can get everything back by just logging back into a new phone.

Not to mention that a phone has built-in communications and tracking systems to somewhat minimize losing them.
 
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NT1440

macrumors G5
May 18, 2008
12,176
14,212
If you have an iPhone and use it regularly, you are already doing so many things and relying on it constantly. Why draw the line at unlocking things?
I bought and fixed up an 05 Volvo specifically because I can get 250K+ miles out of it AND it didn’t have any BS tech in it to take the car out of commission when it breaks or a software mechanism causes a problem. I probably won’t buy another car until a basic electric car comes out that doesn’t have all these high tech features like self driving. Think the Original VW Beetle of electrics.

I don’t want any of this connected crap in my home or my car. I like to be able to fix things myself. I don’t understand all these connected devices beyond the “gee whiz” factor.

I should note I’m an IT guy, but when it comes to MY stuff the last thing I want is hyper connectivity for the sake of Hyperconnectivity.
 

ericinboston

macrumors 68000
Jan 13, 2008
1,833
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The fact is that carmakers really pushed proximity car unlock after GM killed 124 people with their too-limp ignition switch, and Chrysler recalled around 1 Million cars due to issues like people hitting the switch with their knee. So it was really a way to prevent people from dying. They have more confidence in making 1 piece of safety-critical software versus millions of mechanical switches with tolerances. This is also on top of a number of ignition-switch related fires that have resulted in recalls in decades past.
I have no idea what you are getting at with those 2 examples. Are you trying to say that the 2 physical problems should/could be solved by some fancy software-based wireless technology rather than fire/sue the people who made the defective parts/designs? Also, you're not really trying to convince us that software, even "safety-critical software" is safer than a physical object are you? You'd rather rely on a piece of code, that requires an OS to run it, which requires electricity and is dependent on temperature, to act as a safety device instead of the metal plug? I have a great example for you...I have a 2018 Honda CRV. When the temperature falls below 24 degrees Fahrenheit (relatively often 4 months of the year here in CT for at least a few hours of the day), the whole bleeping computer/radio/thermostat/ screen thingy is 100% off. There is absolutely nothing I can do...even warming up the car for 30 mins does not help. If I spend my time and take it to the dealer, it very likely will not fail in front of them (due to the car warming up for the 40 minute ride and then their warm bays, and the odds of the outdoor temp still being cold by the time I can get there on that particular day) and I would bet they would say "I dunno" regardless if it failed or not. Then I have to weigh them ordering the parts, waiting a week, returning and dropping car off all day, let them rip apart my dashboard to put in a new system, with a new OS, set up the radio and stuff again, and PRAY that it works. This isn't a safety system but it's a darn good percentage of where the car's features are located...in 1 basket of eggs.
 
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Infinite Vortex

macrumors 6502
Mar 6, 2015
297
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The part I really don't like is that it requires "everything" to be powered… constantly powered… typically battery powered. I like my tech as much as anyone but a big part of me wants to leave this planet to the next generation in a better shape that I received it from the previous generation. This isn't the way forward to achieving that in more ways than one.
 

ericinboston

macrumors 68000
Jan 13, 2008
1,833
202
If you have an iPhone and use it regularly, you are already doing so many things and relying on it constantly. Why draw the line at unlocking things?

I am talking about physical vs. non-physical manipulation by the iPhone/smartphone. I posted a more detailed post a few mins ago.