Another semantics rant

Gregg2

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I've noticed increased confusion over the difference between "anyway" and "any way" in posts here and elsewhere of late. Off course, that's one that spellcheck won't catch. ;)

Feel free to add other instances to the thread, or to ignore it.

hehe... The spel chekr didn't like my use of "off" but let it pass... wouldn't let me leave out the apostrophe of a contraction.
 

Huntn

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May 5, 2008
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I don’t know, while the differences are noted (after looking it up ;)), the two versions seem close enough that they could easily be used interchangeably.

http://englishplus.com/grammar/00000283.htm

My contribution to the thread, which I’ve mentioned before in another thread in this forum is the oft inappropriately used cliche “no problem”.

The proper use of “no problem” is when someone has inconvienced you, but you are ok with it. It should not be used as a response in the routine conduct of business.

I’d like to order a Linenkugal Red.

Proper response: My pleasure, or certainly, but not no problem.
 

eyoungren

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Aug 31, 2011
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I've noticed increased confusion over the difference between "anyway" and "any way" in posts here and elsewhere of late. Off course, that's one that spellcheck won't catch. ;)

Feel free to add other instances to the thread, or to ignore it.

hehe... The spel chekr didn't like my use of "off" but let it pass... wouldn't let me leave out the apostrophe of a contraction.
"awhile" and "a while". The differentation is in the context of how it's used. Ex: "Awhile back, I…" and "In a while I will…"
 
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Gutwrench

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Jan 2, 2011
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I don’t know, while the differences are noted (after looking it up ;)), the two versions seem close enough that they could easily be used interchangeably.

http://englishplus.com/grammar/00000283.htm

My contribution to the thread, which I’ve mentioned before in another thread in this forum is the oft inappropriately used cliche “no problem”.

The proper use of “no problem” is when someone has inconvienced you, but you are ok with it. It should not be used as a response in the routine conduct of business.

I’d like to order a Linenkugal Red.

Proper response: My pleasure, or certainly, but not no problem.
When it comes to informal slang, I don’t think there’s any hard usage rules. Whether it’s etiquettely correct is a separate matter.
 
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Huntn

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May 5, 2008
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When it comes to informal slang, I don’t think there’s any hard usage rules. Whether it’s etiquettely correct is a separate matter.
Not sure if you are addressing the first thing I said, the second, or both. :)

If the second, I feel strongly that if you are performing the routine part of your job, responding to something like placing an order from a menu, there is a big opportunity to reply with a positive response, my pleasure, versus a neutral to negative response, no problem, because as a rule the customer would expect anything on the menu to be available and not be told it’s no problem for the employee to serve what their restaurant offers because the customer would not expect that to be a problem. :)
 

Gutwrench

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Jan 2, 2011
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Not sure if you are addressing the first thing I said, the second, or both. :)

If the second, I feel strongly that if you are performing the routine part of your job, responding to something like placing an order from a menu, there is a big opportunity to reply with a positive response, my pleasure, versus a neutral to negative response, no problem, because as a rule the customer would expect anything on the menu to be available and not be told it’s no problem for the employee to serve what their restaurant offers because the customer would not expect that to be a problem. :)
I agree, in many settings etiquette suggests slang and colloquialisms like ‘no problem’ ought to be avoided when addressing customers.
 

Mac'nCheese

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Feb 9, 2010
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Fun fact, “moot” originally had the opposite meaning of the currently accepted one.

Additionally, I HATE that because of misuse and misunderstanding, “anxious” is now evolving to mean “eager.” The words are antonyms, but are now becoming synonyms.
And because of idiots like Kim Kardashian, literal now means the opposite of what it really means.
 

LizKat

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Aug 5, 2004
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Thought a PRSI thread had been placed here when I first read the title as Another Semitic Rant.
:D I have occasionally mis-read (usually towards some NSFW-inclined direction) the titles of threads even in PRSI, so you can imagine the ways in which my nervous system has been shocked once in awhile during a first cuppa coffee and a skim of PRSI threads.

I'm fairly forgiving of certain errors in social media posts just because of the ambience in which they're posted, e.g., distracted attention spans, using uncooperative virtual keyboards, etc. We're writing and editing on the fly so we're bound to run into (or commit) errors like "There's so many cars on the road..." and sure, it should be "there are" -- but social media posts are ephemeral enough I'm willing to say a) so what and b) I know I commit these errors myself so this whole paragraph is defensive. :D

My own pet peeves run more to stuff like professional journalists using "less" when "fewer" is the correct modifier: less flour, but fewer eggs. And please, not "less people". :eek:
 
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orbital~debris

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Mar 3, 2004
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I've been irritated for ages by "could care less". It's become a set phrase, despite the three words in it being pretty simple to understand.
You have allies!

That doesn’t make sense in the context of your comment? You’re saying they care somewhat, but could care less than that.

Surely it’s “couldn't care less”?
This is correct.

“Could care less” is incorrect and makes no sense (as you’ve described) nearly everywhere people use it today and this trend to use it is very frustrating. “Could NOT care less” is correct.

It’s right up there with “I should of done XYZ.” Sigh. It’s “... should have ...” !!!
 
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LizKat

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Aug 5, 2004
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I don't know why but recently I've been seeing a lot of people using the word "apart" incorrectly.

"Thanks for allowing me to be apart of this terrific event." o_O
That one's actually funny. Sticking "from" in place of "of" there puts a whole new spin on it...

As presented, probably output of a spell checker without the grammar checker piece, one can hope.

I get so I'm not sure which approach is potentially more embarrassing: either having checkers turned on with automatic correction, and not noticing that some typo I inadvertently proposed was converted into a real howler, or else winging it and not noticing some other howler I created all on my own.
 

Gregg2

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Original poster
May 22, 2008
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Milwaukee, WI
My latest peeve is the use of “there’s” for both ”there is” and “there are.”
...especially in written communication. I try to get that right when speaking, and, if I don't, I usually correct myself.
[doublepost=1551809015][/doublepost]
I don't know why but recently I've been seeing a lot of people using the word "apart" incorrectly.

"Thanks for allowing me to be apart of this terrific event." o_O
That's very similar to what I mentioned in post #1. I haven't seen that one much myself, but I would notice it.
[doublepost=1551809136][/doublepost]
Fun fact, “moot” originally had the opposite meaning of the currently accepted one.
I know a guy who always says "mute point". He's well-educated and very smart, but I guess he heard it wrong as a kid and it stuck.