Apple Announces Expanded Employee Benefits for New Parents

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
7,734
8,678



Apple today announced a new employee benefit that's designed to ease the transition back to work for new parents, expanding on the 16 weeks of leave that parents are already provided with an additional four-week grace period.

Apple's head of retail and human resources shared details on the changes with Fast Company.

"What we find a lot of times is people are really excited to get back to work," says O'Brien, Apple's head of retail and human resources. "At the same time, [they] feel like they need to make sure things are really stable and successful at home. And that weighs heavy on people's minds, I think."
Apple's new policy will give parents a four-week period after returning from leave where they'll be paid like full-time employees but will have the flexibility to work part-time or set their own hours with a manager's oversight.

The updated transition period will be available to all new parents, including those who adopt or take in foster children (non-birth parents are allowed six weeks of paid leave rather than 16). Retail workers are also able to take advantage of the parental leave changes.

Along with the new transition period, Apple is expanding leave for adoptive parents by four weeks through a Paid Family Care benefit that lets parents take time off for family illness. Apple is also tripling its financial assistance for families that choose to adopt, providing up to $14,000 towards an adoption.

For all employees, Apple is improving its mental wellness benefits and will double the number of free counseling sessions available to employees per year along with providing telemedicine options.

According to O'Brien, Apple is hoping to make it easier for parents to ultimately return to work after a period of leave. "I think many times working parents feel like they need to deal with that quietly and make it seem perfectly seamless," O'Brien told Fast Company. "We all know life is complicated. So [we're] making it really clear that we're supporting them in that journey."

Article Link: Apple Announces Expanded Employee Benefits for New Parents
 
  • Like
Reactions: MareLuce

slineaudi

macrumors regular
Oct 12, 2009
100
44
That’s wonderful but doesn’t Apple already have something like 20 weeks paid time off for maternity leave? I think if I was off work that long someone would realize they could manage without me!
 
  • Like
Reactions: javen

btrach144

macrumors 68000
Aug 28, 2015
1,641
3,646
What about the infertile?
I work for Microsoft and we offer fertility services and adoption services assistance (money and resources). Adoptive parents receive the same time off as birth parents.
- - Post merged: - -

What are non-parents getting?
Why do you act like it’s a vacation? I’m currently on paternity leave and haven’t slept in the last two weeks.

Why do “non-parents” deserve something for not doing anything?
 

konqerror

macrumors 6502a
Dec 31, 2013
977
1,763
Why do “non-parents” deserve something for not doing anything?
Why do Americans put up with such pitiful parental leave?
You have to be aware of unintended consequences. If parents or women get significantly more benefits, which impact companies financially and co-workers organizationally, then people will consciously or unconsciously avoid hiring and promoting parents and women, especially in small businesses and startups with limited resources.
 

jdechko

macrumors 601
Jul 1, 2004
4,080
213
Last edited by a moderator:

redmac

macrumors regular
Apr 7, 2008
181
144
San Francisco
6 weeks for non-birth parents is a pretty crappy policy these days.
When my son was born, I was able to take 6 weeks off from work only because I live in California instead of a different state. Even then, my company that was based in another state didn't pay me at all. All I earned was 2/3 of my regular pay that came from the State of California.
 

jimbobb24

macrumors 65816
Jun 6, 2005
1,083
1,341
Awesome news for Apple employees! I just wish such parental, and social in general, benefits would be the government standard nationwide (US) than an outlier from private company.
I am a parent and probably one of the biggest fans of people having children in the world. On average I took off 2-3 days for my children. Why should the standard be that having a baby means your fellow employees need to pick up your slack and your employer needs to keep paying you to do nothing? This is great for Apple but if I were single I would be upset that the wonder and joy of someone having a child means my job is all screwed up? If your company can handle that great - but that would destroy my company so I don’t want that to be the standard.
 

oneMadRssn

macrumors 601
Sep 8, 2011
4,814
11,211
New England
What are you offering your employees?
My company gives 8 weeks to secondary caretakers, 16 weeks to primary caretakers. Let's use 8/16 for short. That is pretty good, but not amazing.

Among it's peers, Apple's policy is pretty low:
Google is 12/24.
Amazon is 6/20.
Microsoft is 12/20.
IBM is 12/20.


Other smaller tech companies have better policies:
Pintrest is 16/16.
Etsy is 26/26.
Adobe is 16/26.
Citrix is 18/18.

Currently, this is one of the first benefits I look up when deciding whether to apply to a company. Not for the paid-time off per se, but to see whether the company takes child-care time off seriously from a company culture standpoint.
- - Post merged: - -

When my son was born, I was able to take 6 weeks off from work only because I live in California instead of a different state. Even then, my company that was based in another state didn't pay me at all. All I earned was 2/3 of my regular pay that came from the State of California.
Yea, the US pretty much sucks in this regard. If you have an in-demand skill in a competitive industry, you can get way better benefits than others.

I usually support politicians that are for universal parental leave. This should really be a federal issue.
 

brewcitywi

macrumors 6502
Sep 29, 2007
270
28
You have to be aware of unintended consequences. If parents or women get significantly more benefits, which impact companies financially and co-workers organizationally, then people will consciously or unconsciously avoid hiring and promoting parents and women, especially in small businesses and startups with limited resources.
There are consequences to every decision. When someone (usually the mom), takes maternity leave (once per child), and sometimes must return “part time,” they lose years of potential increases and advancement. Sometimes their dream job is gone forever, careers can stall.

If anyone believes that giving a new parent a 4-week grace period to adjust to work is somehow an unfair advantage over “non parents,” I think you’re so drastically out of touch that I find it hard to put it into words.

There was a study that showed that women lose $100,000-200,000 in lifetime wage every time they have a child. And, we’re squabbling about a 4-week “grace period?” Wow.

For the record, I’m a dad with 2 children. My wife would have loved the grace period.