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Apple CEO Tim Cook was once again named one of "the 100 most influential people" by TIME magazine in its annual list recognizing individuals who have made a major impact on the world. Tim Cook is recognized as a "Titan" alongside people like Yuri Milner, Binny and Sachin Bansal, Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, Wang Jianlin, and Pope Francis.

Each person included on TIME's list is featured alongside an essay written by an associate, with Cook's 2016 note penned by Disney CEO Bob Iger.

timcooktimemagazine-800x600.jpg
Apple is known for elegant, innovative products that change the world by transforming how we connect, create and communicate, as well as how we work, think and act. Its continued success requires a leader of great courage and character who demands excellence, upholds the highest ethical standards and routinely challenges the status quo, including encouraging vital conversations about who we are as a culture and a community.

Tim Cook is that kind of leader.

Behind his soft-spoken demeanor and Southern manners is a focused fearlessness that comes from deep personal conviction. Tim is committed to doing the right thing, in the right way, at the right time and for the right reasons. As CEO, he's led Apple to new heights, and he continues to build a global brand that is universally recognized as an industry leader and widely respected for its values.
Tim Cook has been included on the list of most influential people several times, and in 2014, Cook was nominated for the TIME person of the year after making the bold move of publicly announcing his sexual orientation despite being a notoriously private person.

Other notable people included on TIME's 2016 list include actors, world leaders, scientists, and notable people from the tech world. Priscilla and Mark Zuckerberg, YouTuber Pewdiepie, Aziz Ansari, Sundar Pichai, Stephen Curry, Adele, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Barack Obama were some of this year's most influential people.

Article Link: Apple CEO Tim Cook Named to TIME's Annual List of 100 Most Influential People
 
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mattopotamus

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Jun 12, 2012
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It increasingly looks like Cook's biggest contributions to Apple with be in the area of ethics and environment, and that's not a bad thing. His stand against the FBI was the icebreaker that encouraged other tech industries to follow his lead.

perfectly said.

The only thing I like about this picture is my hope that the MacBook in the background is the new MacBook Pro.

I see what you are doing haha
 
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Blackstick

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Aug 11, 2014
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Dynamically different leader than Steve was, and probably what the company needed. Tim will go down in the Fruit Co. history book as the CEO who made the company a little bit friendlier to those on the outside, and a company with a culture of advocacy for what's right, which I prefer over the secret-lab/startup mentality previously instilled.
 

teknikal90

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Jan 28, 2008
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Dynamically different leader than Steve was, and probably what the company needed. Tim will go down in the Fruit Co. history book as the CEO who made the company a little bit friendlier to those on the outside, and a company with a culture of advocacy for what's right, which I prefer over the secret-lab/startup mentality previously instilled.
really?
you want a tech company to be less of an innovating tech company and more of an activist?
I 'm not saying that it's not a welcome contribution, it's a balance. Advocacy for what's right is always a good thing. But I think everyone has a part to play. Including tech companies. And it's their job to do that part.
My foot is great at a lot of things, but it would make a pretty terrible hand.

A tech company should remain good at innovating in their labs.
 

thermodynamic

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Don't see very much in that essay other than a typical description of a CEO whether deserved or not. The only metric that should matter is the long-term success of the company and that is often beyond the control of any single executive.

^^This

Time has put up lots of positions and takes a more clinical approach, to which not everyone agrees - depending on person and/or why, though those two factors are invariably related.
 

Kaibelf

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Because all new iMacs have at least a Fusion drive and the iPhone 6s/6s+ starts at 32 GB? That would be doing the right thing at the right time and for the right reasons.

Why is any of that "right" or "wrong?"

For the ceo of one of the largest companies on the world he has a pretty lame view from his office window.

And the fact that having an office window with a view isn't a viable concern to him is why his company is so huge.
 
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Gasu E.

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Don't see very much in that essay other than a typical description of a CEO whether deserved or not. The only metric that should matter is the long-term success of the company and that is often beyond the control of any single executive.


Clearly Cook is more than a typical CEO. Just go back one month, where he was the very public face of one side of the privacy debate. And the essay was very, very short, but alluded to that kind of leadership.
 

thermodynamic

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Dynamically different leader than Steve was, and probably what the company needed. Tim will go down in the Fruit Co. history book as the CEO who made the company a little bit friendlier to those on the outside, and a company with a culture of advocacy for what's right, which I prefer over the secret-lab/startup mentality previously instilled.

Cook is a good guy. I never understand the hate. He's not Jobs, so get over it.

Ignoring how he helped China when that country wanted source code, even for security concerns: Like Apple and its CEO apparently continuing to look the other way over child labor (the latest, from 2016, involves kids in cobalt mines in a factory Apple directly uses and chooses to use. Apple has a position to be able to do something. It chooses not to. The myth is wonderful to feel good over, but that is all it is. A myth. Cook hasn't been much different than his predecessor. Many issues are still going on, which even his predecessor knew about. Now maybe people will get over it the moment they become slaves as well? Because, guess what, those workers in those factories probably don't have the same rosy picture of these CEO folks. Can you count the reasons, perhaps? Mainstream tech news media has reported and still reports relevant issues. Will the MSM get over it? Nope. And there are at least three reasons why it continues to post such articles and it's not because they're all jealous of the CEO...
 
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thermodynamic

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really?
you want a tech company to be less of an innovating tech company and more of an activist?
I 'm not saying that it's not a welcome contribution, it's a balance. Advocacy for what's right is always a good thing. But I think everyone has a part to play. Including tech companies. And it's their job to do that part.
My foot is great at a lot of things, but it would make a pretty terrible hand.

A tech company should remain good at innovating in their labs.

Activism for what? Just because they have gay people don't mean anything, except that gay people work there. I'm not hetero, so if people think all non-heteros are going to worship some guy that isn't hetero "just because they're the same" is idiotic.

Business needs to stay in its labs, I agree.
 
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