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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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Apple CEO Tim Cook was today asked about some of the regulatory issues that Apple is facing with the App Store, and he said that Apple is keeping its focus on privacy and security. Apple is facing potential regulatory changes that would force it to open up the iPhone to other app stores or alternate ways of loading apps on the iPhone.

app-store-blue-banner.jpg

The main thing we're focused on in the App Store is keeping our focus on privacy and security. These are the two major tenets that have produced a very trusted environment where consumers and developers come together. Consumers can trust the developers and the apps are who they say they are. Developers get a huge audience to sell their software to.

That's sort of number one on our list. Everything else is a distant second. What we're doing is working to explain the decisions that we've made that are key to keeping our privacy and security. Not having sideloading and alternate ways on the iPhone where we're opening up the iPhone to unreviewed apps that get by the privacy restrictions we put on the App Store.
Cook went on to say that Apple is "very focused in discussing privacy and security of the App Store with regulators and legislators."

Apple recently came out largely victorious in its antitrust lawsuit with Epic Games, with the judge in that case ruling that Apple does not have a monopoly. Apple was, however, told to allow developers to put links to outside websites and alternate payment options in their apps.

Apple was given a deadline in December to make this change, but Apple has appealed for more time and has asked to avoid making changes until the entire case has come to a conclusion.

Back in June, U.S. lawmakers introduced antitrust legislation that would require Apple to make sweeping changes to the App Store, which Apple will undoubtedly fight against.

Article Link: Apple CEO Tim Cook: We're Focused on Maintaining Privacy and Security of the App Store
 

antiprotest

macrumors 68000
Apr 19, 2010
1,884
2,347
I think Tim Cook should no longer be able to use the word “privacy.”
With so many devices on one platform and observing the direction they seem to be heading, such as the "features" that they have been adding and about to add, and those that they're probably working on but have not announced yet, eventually Apple might become the greatest threat to privacy in human history.
 

ChrisA

macrumors G4
Jan 5, 2006
11,877
710
Redondo Beach, California
What if the iPhone were as open as the Mac? What could Apple say about that without calling the Mac "not secure"?

On the mac, I can run any software I can find or write. But yet the mac is quite good at keeping information isolated because it is after all BSD Unix under the skin. IOS is the same OS under the skin too.

It should be obvious that what Apple really cares about is their 20% cut of the App store's income.

An Open iPhone could be as secure as the Open mac already is.
 

nutmac

macrumors 603
Mar 30, 2004
5,388
5,194
...and profit
Exactly. Action speaks louder than words. Google reduced their commission to 15% (and 10% for music streaming services) across the board.

If the profit is secondary, Apple should reduce the commission immediately.
 
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Paddle1

macrumors 68040
May 1, 2013
3,657
1,479
What if the iPhone were as open as the Mac? What could Apple say about that without calling the Mac "not secure"?

On the mac, I can run any software I can find or write. But yet the mac is quite good at keeping information isolated because it is after all BSD Unix under the skin. IOS is the same OS under the skin too.

It should be obvious that what Apple really cares about is their 20% cut of the App store's income.

An Open iPhone could be as secure as the Open mac already is.
They wouldn't try. Craig Federighi had no issue calling the Mac insecure compared to the iPhone during the Epic trial.
 
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Wildkraut

macrumors 68020
Nov 8, 2015
2,143
3,552
Germany
Look what Facebook did when they got hold of our Privacy.
Well, since the beginning we knew what kind of companies Twitter, Facebook, Google & Co. are, the Ad business and Privacy simply doesn’t fit, nothing new, really. But in case of Apple, they preached their privacy commitment actively over many years, said how bad and privacy intrusive other companies are and blah blah blah. Now they continue trying to wear a white vest, while doing the same or worse.
I find Apples behaviour much more severe, they keep lying at the face of their user base, misusing the trust they gained over years.
 

TheLinkster

macrumors member
Jan 9, 2001
66
171
Well, since the beginning we knew what kind of companies Twitter, Facebook, Google & Co. are, the Ad business and Privacy simply doesn’t fit, nothing new, really. But in case of Apple, they preached their privacy commitment actively over many years, said how bad and privacy intrusive other companies are and blah blah blah. Now they continue trying to wear a white vest, while doing the same or worse.
I find Apples behaviour much more severe, they keep lying at the face of their user base, misusing the trust they gained over years.
The behavior of Twitter, Facebook and Google is somehow less severe because they're "open" about stealing your information? That logic totally checks out.
 

Shirasaki

macrumors G5
May 16, 2015
12,679
6,648
Sure. Say what you want.
People will judge accordingly, regardless of your comments and/or statements.
 
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Ebarella

macrumors member
Oct 20, 2020
72
124
What if the iPhone were as open as the Mac? What could Apple say about that without calling the Mac "not secure"?

On the mac, I can run any software I can find or write. But yet the mac is quite good at keeping information isolated because it is after all BSD Unix under the skin. IOS is the same OS under the skin too.

It should be obvious that what Apple really cares about is their 20% cut of the App store's income.

An Open iPhone could be as secure as the Open mac already is.
Don't know too much about high end hacking
Is the Mac even as vulnerable to things like Pegasus? To me it seems that Mac being so open makes malware detection and removal easier.
It's amazing NSO is still spying users and no one is doing anything about it
 
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