Apple Criticizes Proposed Anti-Encryption Legislation in Australia

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by MacRumors, Oct 12, 2018.

  1. MacRumors macrumors bot

    MacRumors

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    The Australian government is considering a bill that would require tech companies like Apple to provide "critical assistance" to government agencies who are investigating crimes.

    According to the Australian government, encryption is problematic because encrypted communications "are increasingly being used by terrorist groups and organized criminals to avoid detection and disruption."

    [​IMG]

    As noted by TechCrunch, Apple today penned a seven-page letter to the Australian parliament criticizing the proposed legislation.

    In the letter, Apple calls the bill "dangerously ambiguous" and explains the importance of encryption in "protecting national security and citizens' lives" from criminal attackers who are finding more serious and sophisticated ways to infiltrate iOS devices.
    Apple says that it "challenges the idea" that weaker encryption is necessary to aid law enforcement investigations as it has processed more than 26,000 requests for data to help solve crimes in Australia over the course of the last five years.

    According to Apple, the language in the bill is broad and vague, with "ill-defined restrictions." As an example, Apple says the language in the bill would permit the government to order companies who make smart home speakers to "install persistent eavesdropping capabilities" or require device makers to create a tool to unlock devices.

    Apple says additional work needs to be done on the bill to include a "firm mandate" that "prohibits the weakening of encryption or security protections," with the company going on to outline a wide range of specific concerns that it hopes the Australian parliament will address. The list of flaws Apple has found with the bill can be found in the full letter.

    Apple has been fighting against anti-encryption legislation and attempts to weaken device encryption for years, and its most public battle was against the U.S. government in 2016 after Apple was ordered to help the FBI unlock the iPhone owned by Syed Farook, one of the shooters in the December 2015 attacks in San Bernardino.

    Apple opposed the order and claimed that it would set a "dangerous precedent" with serious implications for the future of smartphone encryption. Apple ultimately held its ground and the U.S. government backed off after finding an alternate way to access the device, but Apple has continually had to deal with further law enforcement efforts to combat encryption.

    Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

    Article Link: Apple Criticizes Proposed Anti-Encryption Legislation in Australia
     
  2. macfacts macrumors 68030

    macfacts

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  3. martyjmclean, Oct 12, 2018
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 12, 2018

    martyjmclean macrumors regular

    martyjmclean

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    I’m 110% behind Apple on this one. Even if I wasn’t, I still would be - anything to call out the Liberal party on their bull****.
     
  4. Jsameds macrumors 68040

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    If there’s one thing that you can’t criticize Apple for, it’s their stance on your right to privacy.
     
  5. Orlandoech macrumors 68040

    Orlandoech

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    I love how Apple pretends to be the good guy and I love how people believe it. LOL!
     
  6. Rhonindk macrumors 68040

    Rhonindk

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    That appears to be ongoing issue with these types of legislation; vague and broad.
     
  7. Sasparilla, Oct 12, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2018

    Sasparilla macrumors 6502a

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  8. bobenhaus macrumors 6502a

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    Just because Apple has billions of dollars stored away somewhere doesn't mean they can try to influence other countries politics. Deal with it!
     
  9. WannaGoMac macrumors 68020

    WannaGoMac

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    Look forward to you posting some citations backing your nebulous statement.

    In any case, they are the only corporate entity that at least tries to stand by privacy rights, mostly cause they can as it doesn't officially make money off selling it's user data.
     
  10. Orlandoech macrumors 68040

    Orlandoech

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    Lol ok.
     
  11. peterh988 macrumors 6502a

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    And that's the problem with stuff like this, mission creep.

    In the UK, RIPA was only going to affect people involved in serious criminal activity. It's been used for dog fouling, and to see if people live in the correct school catchment area.

    They can't use their powers responsibly, so they shouldn't have them.
     
  12. BootsWalking macrumors 6502a

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    If Apple is forced to compromise their encryption in Australia then the encryption we enjoy here might be compromised as well, since it's a shared code base and any method Apple implements has the potential to be utilized here too (by hackers), whether Apple wants it to or not.
     
  13. justperry macrumors G3

    justperry

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    Fact is all iOS devices are affected, also in countries where encryption is allowed, pretty sure the EU wants to make it law that gives this right to all it's citizens.
     
  14. Firebrand macrumors regular

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    As if encryption is the #1 problem in the world ;-)

    Bye the bye, encryption has been around since — let’s say early days. Used by governments.
     
  15. c3po7 macrumors 6502

    c3po7

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    #15
  16. supertomtom macrumors 6502

    supertomtom

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    #16
    Maybe you should go to China and try to openly criticise the government there, let us know how that turns out for you ;)
     
  17. Cosmosent macrumors 6502

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  18. whyamihere macrumors 6502

    whyamihere

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    #18
    Any terrorist or organized crime that would ever be stupid enough to make their plans with a smart speaker nearby would most assuredly be easily caught via legitimate/legal means anyway. This is simply the government wanting the ability to easily surveil the masses with complete disregard for the right of privacy.
     
  19. keysofanxiety macrumors G3

    keysofanxiety

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    #19
    Crikey mate, throw another civil liberty on the barbie. I’m ripper ravished for treading on freedom — I could nosh a Joey straight from the madda’s pouch.
     
  20. Marekul macrumors regular

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    Wich only counts for people outside of China.
    They didn’t try much in China. Instead they gave iCloud keys over to government. Apple is a joke when it comes to privacy where it is really needed.
     
  21. c3po7 macrumors 6502

    c3po7

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    #21
    I literally don't know one Australian that talks like that. A number of those words aren't even Strine (Australian Broad Accent and Slang).
     
  22. keysofanxiety macrumors G3

    keysofanxiety

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    #22
    Australians don’t talk like that? Really? I had no idea.

    Next you’re going to tell me that Americans don’t hyuck-hyuck and punctuate every sentence with a gunshot as an eagle soars above their head to the background chant of U-S-A! U-S-A!

    Thanks for keeping me right.
     
  23. c3po7 macrumors 6502

    c3po7

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    #23
    The Australian Conservatives have gone nuts, too far to the right for mainstream Australia, I'm not voting for the Conservative Liberal Party at the next election.
    --- Post Merged, Oct 12, 2018 ---

    LOL
     
  24. npmacuser5 macrumors 65816

    npmacuser5

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    #24
    China sells the ability to watch its citizens as away of protecting them. The Governments job and they do it better. What the Australian Government appears to be selling. Which side you are on comes down to how much faith one puts in their government. Chinese Government has very little trouble answering the question, your post. We the US are an interesting lot. Half the folks believe whatever the current President of the US says, 100% trust. For them, if he said encryption a bad thing and I need it removed, OK. The other half, have Government trust issues. See it as away to keep Government powers under control. Two very diverse sides to the encryptions debate.
     
  25. Marekul macrumors regular

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    #25
    Apple Security is already severely compromised with having a very large subset of users on Infrastructure owned by a fascist totalitarian dictatorship which also Has access to private keys.
     

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