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macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
54,609
16,743



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The Loop reports that Apple is facing a new patent lawsuit from NetAirus Technologies over the iPhone. While Apple is routinely the target of such actions, this particular lawsuit is interesting if only because it appears to be targeting the entire concept of the iPhone rather than a minor aspect of its features or technology.
Filed in the Central District of California Western Division, NetAirus claims that Apple's iPhone infringes '380 patent. The patent issued on September 5, 2006 and held by NetAirus describes a "Wireless Handset Communication System."
The suit targets all three versions of the iPhone released so far and seeks cash damages and a halt to iPhone production.

Little is known about NetAirus, although it appears that this patent's inventor, Richard J. Ditzik, holds a number of patents related to flat panel display technology. Barron's notes that he has filed patent lawsuits against several other companies over the past few years, including Panasonic and Samsung. Ditzik appears to have filed the lawsuits using different company names over the years, suggesting that he may be a one-man operation setting up a various corporate entities to pursue patent complaints against larger corporations.

Article Link: Apple Facing New Patent Lawsuit Over iPhone
 

thetexan

macrumors 6502a
May 11, 2009
720
0
If Apple is going to dish out frivolous lawsuits (HTC) then Apple is prepared to take frivolous lawsuits. This further proves we need some patent law reform when it comes to technology.
 

aiqw9182

macrumors 65816
Apr 22, 2010
1,089
0
So some no name company now decides they want to sue Apple 3 years after the iPhone was released? Good luck with that.
 

ProwlingTiger

macrumors 65816
Jan 15, 2008
1,333
219
Oh it's a "wireless handset communication system"! Damn I knew the iPhone reminded me a lot of every other single flippin mobile device.

We need a 'loser pays' system in America. That way we could end ******** frivolous lawsuits. The sad thing is, that it will probably cost Apple more to defend itself than it will to settle. That's how people make money off of corporate law.
 

wallinbl

macrumors regular
Jan 11, 2003
112
0
Make an effort to actually make a product, or take your patents and shove off. Patenting things with no intention to make a product should be illegal. Patents are to promote progress, not to prevent it.
 

wjlafrance

macrumors 6502
Dec 23, 2009
359
1
Madison, WI
Am I reading this wrong or is Apple getting sued for making a wireless communication device, also known as a cell phone?

Good bye Google, Nokia, Samsung, Motorola, HTC, Skype, etc.
 

JediZenMaster

Suspended
Mar 28, 2010
2,180
654
Seattle
This is BS just look a the actual patent it mentions "Hinge Device" and "Keyboard Assembly" None of the 3 variants of the iphone's have had a hinge or Physical keyboard.
 

JAQ

macrumors 6502
May 13, 2008
302
71
Purgatory MI
So he filed for a patent on something so broad and obvious that it covers the whole concept behind the smartphone, got lucky enough to get a bad patent examiner trained to act on bad precedent, and now he's trolling companies that actually develop the concepts into devices. US patent law is even more fscked up than copyright law, and should be ruled unConstitutional since it no longer "promotes the Progress of Science and useful Arts".
 

JediZenMaster

Suspended
Mar 28, 2010
2,180
654
Seattle
This is stupid. What's next? Someone claiming they have a patent on the word "Air" and trying to say Apple infringed on it by having a portable with the name Air
 

optophobia

macrumors 6502a
Oct 26, 2007
877
24
Hudson MA
So some no name company now decides they want to sue Apple 3 years after the iPhone was released? Good luck with that.

Well if you sue them straight away, then you don't get to sue for as much....
This all emphasizes that the US patent law needs revising. Biotech and pharmaceutical patents are far more out of date.
 

charlituna

macrumors G3
Jun 11, 2008
9,636
815
Los Angeles, CA
So some no name company now decides they want to sue Apple 3 years after the iPhone was released? Good luck with that.

yep

I suspect that the vague "idea"ness of this patent, the date and a whole heck of a lot of prior art will end this with little fuss. The Newton might finally be of some use to Apple
 

3282868

macrumors 603
Jan 8, 2009
5,281
0
Ever since the iPhone was released it seems individuals and small companies have been coming out of the wood work regarding patent infringement. A few things seem suspect. Why now? The iPhone was announced in 2006/07. Wouldn't these patent suits have surfaced immediately? Maybe I should file a suit, I thought of multi-touch in my sleep a few years ago. :rolleyes:
 

Rocketman

macrumors 603
Am I reading this wrong or is Apple getting sued for making a wireless communication device, also known as a cell phone?

Good bye Google, Nokia, Samsung, Motorola, HTC, Skype, etc.

He's not suing them. He likes the color of Apple's money better. Catch up.

I believe by suing in this CA district rather than TX, if he prevails it will have real teeth.

Rocketman
 

azboricua

macrumors 6502a
Aug 5, 2009
559
0
Arizona
I am going to file for a patent on "Mobile Comminucations Device with round corners".




BAM JACK POT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:
 

SPNarwhal

macrumors 65816
Apr 22, 2009
1,255
154
illinois
they could have waited so long to show the "damage" that has been done to them, with all the iphone's success.

otherwise it would only be, hey this company made a new product that goes against our patent.
now it's, hey this company made this product and it obviously dramatically effects us with it's existence because it is the biggest phone in the world.
 

Doctor Q

Administrator
Staff member
The patent says
A small light weight modular microcomputer based computer and communications systems, designed for both portability and desktop uses. The systems make use of a relative large flat panel display device assembly, an expandable hinge device, battery power source, keyboard assembly, and wireless communications devices.​
iPhones aren't designed for desktop use and don't have a hinge or keyboard. Does the patent really still apply if only some of these conditions are met? After all, there are lots of devices that meet some of these conditions.
 
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