Apple Filed for 'Apple Rosetta' Trademark in Japan Earlier This Year

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Apr 12, 2001
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As noted in Asahi.com, on April 30th of this year, Apple applied for a trademark for the term "Apple Rosetta" in Japan.


The original Rosetta software from 2005​

Rosetta was the name for Apple's emulation software that allowed PowerPC apps to run under Intel processors. Apple introduced Rosetta in MacOS X 10.4 (Tiger) to provide a compatibility layer for Mac users while the company transitioned from PowerPC processors to Intel processors.

As a result, Apple has already had the trademark for the term "Rosetta" for sometime, but this new activity and new application surrounding the name is notable given the increasing rumors that Apple is planning on transitioning from Intel to ARM processors in the near future. Apple officially dropped Rosetta support in Mac OS X 10.7 (Lion) in 2011.


The trademark could simply be ongoing protection of a long existing trademark for Apple, but given the recent rumors, the new activity raises the possibility that Apple may decide to recycle the "Rosetta" name for a new emulation layer to transition from Intel to ARM. The trademark was filed under the following category:

A computers computer network And the computer software in which development of the computer programmes on a global communication network and the download for translating and performing are possible, computer software for computings performed by a cross platform, computer software, Electronic machines [apparatus and their parts]
Apple has been widely rumored to transition from Intel to ARM processors in the coming year, but there has be no rumors about how Apple would handle the transition with regard to emulation. Apple currently lists "Rosetta" without the "Apple" prefix in their list of active trademarks.

Thanks Sanda!

Article Link: Apple Filed for 'Apple Rosetta' Trademark in Japan Earlier This Year
 
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Malus120

macrumors 6502
Jun 28, 2002
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Obviously the key question here is going to be performance. How fast will binary translation/emulation be and just as importantly how fast are Apple's ARM chips going to be relative to modern Intel Core/AMD Ryzen.

The original Rosetta's performance was acceptable (quite impressive actually on a technical level), particularly for Apple's notebook lineup, but this was due in large part to just how far behind the PowerPC chips used in Apple's notebooks were compared to x86 at the time. Even the original Core Duos used in the first generation MacBooks absolutely destroyed not only the PowerPC G4s used in Apple's iBook/Powerbooks, but even a lot of PowerPC G5 based Macs.

I highly doubt Apple is going to have quite that large of a performance margin this time around so it will be interesting to see just what they can achieve.

...OTOH, if you put an SSD in an old (circa 2010) Mac with a pre Sandy Bridge Core Ix chip (or even Core 2 Duo) it is surprisingly usable today, so perhaps, for casual users this won't matter as much...

Can't say I'm excited. Please let this just be an additional ISA to be used where it makes sense, and not a whole scale transition (unlikely I know, but I can dream right.)
 

Coesyn

macrumors newbie
Jun 21, 2020
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I just bought my first macbook pro last week, and reading this concerns me a little. How long are the intel chips going to be supported? And are we going to be left behind with software updates, though hopfully software devs will keep both intel and arm build until intel support is officially dropped.

I will be watching with the anticipation tonight as the change to arm seems like it could be a good idea if done right. I just hope that the mac stays as a real desktop and not slimmed down to iOS type of OS.
 

mrr

macrumors 6502
Apr 19, 2008
284
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Oh no. Here we go again. I remember that this was how you had to run Power PC apps on Intel machines. That was living hell. What a kluge. If Apple is going to make us do the same for new ARM computers, I am going to be done with it and get a PC.
 

martyjmclean

macrumors 6502a
Jan 24, 2018
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Sydney, NSW
I just bought my first macbook pro last week, and reading this concerns me a little. How long are the intel chips going to be supported? And are we going to be left behind with software updates, though hopfully software devs will keep both intel and arm build until intel support is officially dropped.

I will be watching with the anticipation tonight as the change to arm seems like it could be a good idea if done right. I just hope that the mac stays as a real desktop and not slimmed down to iOS type of OS.
Return it if you’re too worried, but PPC chips were supported for at least 5 years after the Intel announcement.
 
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adib

macrumors regular
Jun 11, 2010
225
121
Singapore
I just bought my first macbook pro last week, and reading this concerns me a little. How long are the intel chips going to be supported? And are we going to be left behind with software updates, though hopfully software devs will keep both intel and arm build until intel support is officially dropped.

I will be watching with the anticipation tonight as the change to arm seems like it could be a good idea if done right. I just hope that the mac stays as a real desktop and not slimmed down to iOS type of OS.
As per Apple's vintage policy, five years after the last sale. Don't worry too much if you're not a developer.
 
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KPOM

macrumors P6
Oct 23, 2010
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That gives me some hope, because I was becoming increasingly worried that Apple was going to rely entirely on developers re-compiling code and not provide an emulation layer.
Perhaps. But Apple will still likely push for quick recompilation.
- - Post merged: - -

Oh no. Here we go again. I remember that this was how you had to run Power PC apps on Intel machines. That was living hell. What a kluge. If Apple is going to make us do the same for new ARM computers, I am going to be done with it and get a PC.
Rosetta actually worked pretty well. In any case, it didn’t take long for apps to be recompiled. I think Apple will make it easy to recompile existing x64 apps to ARM.
 

jekih11935

macrumors newbie
Jun 13, 2020
9
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That gives me some hope, because I was becoming increasingly worried that Apple was going to rely entirely on developers re-compiling code and not provide an emulation layer.
How much trouble is in recompiling really? Compiler backends have already taken care of it, and LLVM is especially great at it.
 
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MacHiavelli

macrumors 65816
May 17, 2007
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new york
I just bought my first macbook pro last week, and reading this concerns me a little. How long are the intel chips going to be supported? And are we going to be left behind with software updates, though hopfully software devs will keep both intel and arm build until intel support is officially dropped.

I will be watching with the anticipation tonight as the change to arm seems like it could be a good idea if done right. I just hope that the mac stays as a real desktop and not slimmed down to iOS type of OS.
If Arm is announced today with a release soon, return the Intel: it will soon start to hurt when you realise more and more that you’ve wasted money on old (2000s) tech. Embrace the new. Anything else it retrogressive.
 
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recoil80

macrumors 68030
Jul 16, 2014
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If they really start with a MBP like rumoured, SW compatibility will be necessary on day one and they can't expect all developers to migrate their existing apps, especially if the first ARM Mac is launching in less than a year.
- - Post merged: - -

How much trouble is in recompiling really? Compiler backends have already taken care of it, and LLVM is especially great at it.
Sometimes you have third party code as a dependency so you have no choice but to wait for other devs to recompile their stuff.
 

Jyby

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May 31, 2011
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How much trouble is in recompiling really? Compiler backends have already taken care of it, and LLVM is especially great at it.
The problem is what consumers don't often know about- software businesses are businesses, meaning they make a product and most of the time fire people who did most of the work; keeping a skeleton crew on board to support it. Those companies often don't have enough resources to go back and do a port etc etc.. Or they hired a bunch of low skill cheap contractors and it's going to be a nightmare to fix any major issues that could happen.

Video game companies are notorious for this... Make a game and lay off the team. Or they move the team to other work- they can't be distracted to go back and update old stuff with no monetary gain.
 

LV426

macrumors 6502a
Jan 22, 2013
952
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Hopefully I will never need to use this. My current dev workflow involves running Windows 10 in a virtual machine, which works great. I can screw the vm up as often as I like and easily resurrect it from a Time Machine backup.

By the time I’m thinking of getting a new MacBook Pro, I would imagine that Microsoft will have 64-bit Windows 10 running on ARM; thus virtualisation software such as Fusion or Parallels would be able to run Windows happily on a new MacBook. Microsoft already produce an x86 version of Windows 10 compiled for ARM.
 
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