MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
54,121
15,927



Last year, the Italian Competition Authority hit Apple with a 10 million euro fine over "dishonest commercial practices" related to an iPhone performance management system it introduced in iOS 10.2.1 without informing customers. The antitrust watchdog said the update was a form of planned obsolescence.

apple-italy-iphone-performance-notice-800x623.jpg

As a result of the investigation, Apple has been forced to add a consumer protection notice about these "incorrect" practices on its Italian homepage. The notice, loosely translated below, was spotted by setteBIT on Twitter.
Apple, Apple Distribution International, Apple Italia, and Apple Retail Italia have led consumers in possession of an iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6s Plus, or iPhone 6s Plus to install iOS 10 and subsequent updates without providing adequate information about the impact of that choice on the performance of the smartphones and without offering (in a timely manner) any means of restoring the original functionality of the devices in the event of a proven decrease in performance following the update (such as downgrading or a battery replacement at reasonable costs).

This practice was assessed incorrect, pursuant to Articles 20, 21, 22, and 24 of Legislative Decree No. 206 of the Italian Consumer Code by the Italian Competition Authority.
For those who need a refresher about the iPhone slowdown saga, read our lengthy FAQ. Here's a key excerpt:
Why is Apple slowing down some older iPhone models?

iPhones, like many other consumer electronics, are powered by lithium-ion batteries, which have a limited lifespan. As the battery in your iPhone ages, its ability to hold a charge slowly diminishes.

A chemically aging battery can also have increased impedance, reducing its ability to provide a sudden burst of power when demanded by other components in an iPhone, such as the CPU and GPU. A battery's impedance will also temporarily increase when it has a low charge and/or in cold temperatures.

A battery with a high enough impedance may be unable to provide power quickly enough to the iPhone when needed, and Apple safeguards components against the drop in voltage by shutting down the device.

Apple recognized that iPhones unexpectedly shutting down on users is not a good experience, and starting with iOS 10.2.1, it quietly implemented a power management feature to prevent these shutdowns.
Last year, Apple denied any kind of planned obsolescence by flat out stating that it never has and never would do anything to intentionally shorten the life of any Apple product, or degrade the user experience, to drive customer upgrades.
We have never -- and would never -- do anything to intentionally shorten the life of any Apple product, or degrade the user experience to drive customer upgrades. Our goal has always been to create products that our customers love, and making iPhones last as long as possible is an important part of that.
Apple eventually eased concerns by introducing a Battery Health feature in iOS 11.3, with an option to disable the performance management system, and discounting the price of iPhone battery replacements throughout 2018.

Article Link: Apple Forced to Add Notice About iPhone Slowdown Saga on Italian Homepage
 
  • Like
Reactions: apolloa

YaBe

Cancelled
Oct 5, 2017
867
1,530
A better question would have been, why didn't you warn customer before slowing down phones?

While there's nothing wrong with why they slowed iPhones down (and understandable) people would have been happier if warned, AND instructed on how to make it perform great again, instead of led to believe a new phone was the answer.
it quietly implemented a power management feature to prevent these shutdowns.
Understatement of the year!
 
Comment

ikir

macrumors 68000
Sep 26, 2007
1,631
1,366
Ahah cmon... this is a feature. Almost any device do that with a depleted battery, especially if the device is powerful. Workin in IT I see this kind of thing everyday in PC, Macs and other devices. Simply the iPhone doens’t turn off like all the others. Also slow down is not the right term, just less peak power.
 
Comment

DanTheMan827

macrumors regular
May 9, 2012
129
110
Apple said:
We have never — and would never — do anything to intentionally shorten the life of any Apple product

Then why is it that my mid-2009 MacBook pro couldn't run Sierra / High Sierra, yet the MacBook released sometime after with basically identical hardware can...

They also don't offer drivers for my MacBook Pro that are compatible with Windows 10 either...

I know it's old hardware, but at the time they actively decided to stop supporting it even though a similar non-pro version was still actively supported.
 
Last edited:
Comment

justperry

macrumors G4
Aug 10, 2007
11,992
9,028
I'm a rolling stone.
Then why is it not user replaceable?

Why are these batteries not replaceable in many devices NOT made by apple?

They used to be replaceable for a long time, I think the main advantage of having them inside the phone and not replaceable is that it needs less space, normally the battery comparement it shielded of by plastic for instance, this is most likely already a mm think.
 
Comment

DanTheMan827

macrumors regular
May 9, 2012
129
110
They used to be replaceable for a long time, I think the main advantage of having them inside the phone and not replaceable is that it needs less space, normally the battery comparement it shielded of by plastic for instance, this is most likely already a mm think.

So it's just a typical case of apple using form over function...

How hard would it really be to have a sliding back cover like the iPhone 4 had that gave you easy access to the battery?

I'd gladly take a phone that's 2mm thicker if I could replace the battery freely... thin phones just feel slippery in the hand...
 
  • Like
Reactions: AvisDeene
Comment

justperry

macrumors G4
Aug 10, 2007
11,992
9,028
I'm a rolling stone.
Then why is it that my mid-2009 MacBook pro couldn't run Sierra / High Sierra, yet the MacBook released sometime after with basically identical hardware can...

They also don't offer drivers for my MacBook Pro that are compatible with Windows 10 either...

I know it's old hardware, but at the time they actively decided to stop supporting it even though a similar non-pro version was still actively supported.

They said "do anything to intentionally shorten", they don't shorten the life, they just prevent you from running a newer OS, the Mac will still run on the older OS.


So it's just a typical case of apple using form over function...

How hard would it really be to have a sliding back cover like the iPhone 4 had that gave you easy access to the battery?

I'd gladly take a phone that's 2mm thicker if I could replace the battery freely... thin phones just feel slippery in the hand...

The iPhone 4 did not have a sliding cover, you also had to remove screws.

No iPhone ever had a "user replaceable" battery as in, no easy access, need prying open or remove some screws.
 
Last edited:
Comment

az431

Suspended
Sep 13, 2008
2,131
6,120
Portland, OR
A better question would have been, why didn't you warn customer before slowing down phones?

This question has been answered and the topic debated ad nauseam. The throttling does not occur all of the time, most users will not see any throttling, and those that do will not notice any perceptible performance decrease as a result of any throttling.

If Apple informed people of every change that might affect performance in anyway, no matter how minor or how many users it affects, the release notes would be 500 pages long.
[doublepost=1549898538][/doublepost]
Then why is it not user replaceable?

First I've heard that the batteries in any iPhone can't be replaced. I've replaced plenty of iPhone batteries.
 
  • Like
Reactions: emmanoelle
Comment

LordVic

Cancelled
Sep 7, 2011
5,938
12,453
Ahah cmon... this is a feature. Almost any device do that with a depleted battery, especially if the device is powerful. Workin in IT I see this kind of thing everyday in PC, Macs and other devices. Simply the iPhone doens’t turn off like all the others. Also slow down is not the right term, just less peak power.


did you drop your "/s" tag?
 
  • Like
Reactions: aylk and 69Mustang
Comment

TMRJIJ

macrumors 68040
Dec 12, 2011
3,302
5,583
South Carolina, United States
Then why is it that my mid-2009 MacBook pro couldn't run Sierra / High Sierra, yet the MacBook released sometime after with basically identical hardware can...

They also don't offer drivers for my MacBook Pro that are compatible with Windows 10 either...

I know it's old hardware, but at the time they actively decided to stop supporting it even though a similar non-pro version was still actively supported.
Usually it’s a hardware related limitation that Apple can’t (or rather doesn’t care) to work with
  • Snow Leopard killed off the PowerPC Macs
  • Lion took out the Core Duos
  • Mountain Lion executed the integrated GMA graphics models and others that couldn’t support the newer OpenGL framework
  • El Capitan brought SIP protection which was a major blow to hackintosh and Unsupported Mac community. It also took out ‘unnecessary’ chipset Kernel Extensions (remains of Older Macs that could be used by people like me)
  • Mojave took out non-Metal supported graphics.
There are thread here where you can install Sierra+ on your Macs (provided you understand the risks and small hiccups)
 
Comment

1050792

Suspended
Oct 2, 2016
2,515
3,990
Why are these batteries not replaceable in many devices NOT made by apple?
Why bring other devices when we're talking about Apple specifically? Wasn't Apple supposed to be different for the better user experience? :rolleyes:
 
Comment

keysofanxiety

macrumors G3
Nov 23, 2011
9,534
25,288
Ahah cmon... this is a feature. Almost any device do that with a depleted battery, especially if the device is powerful. Workin in IT I see this kind of thing everyday in PC, Macs and other devices. Simply the iPhone doens’t turn off like all the others. Also slow down is not the right term, just less peak power.

Yes, every device does this. Windows, Mac, whatever. It's been present in MacBooks where the CPU is heavily throttled if it doesn't detect a battery, or if the battery needs to be replaced urgently. We've known about this for decades, yet somehow it's different when it comes to phones or people think it's a sneaky "Tim Crook" feature.

I wish they did it with my iPhone 5S in its later life. Nothing worse than having a tethered battery life or a phone which dies at any given time so I don't even know if my Uber request in the freezing cold in the middle of nowhere went through.

Dangerous to write the truth around here though. It doesn't fit an anti-Apple narrative.
 
  • Like
Reactions: emmanoelle
Comment

TMRJIJ

macrumors 68040
Dec 12, 2011
3,302
5,583
South Carolina, United States
How hard would it really be to have a sliding back cover like the iPhone 4 had that gave you easy access to the battery?
iPhone 4 was not designed as having a ‘user replaceable’ battery
First I've heard that the batteries in any iPhone can't be replaced. I've replaced plenty of iPhone batteries.
If the Manufacturer doesn’t give an opening and you have to use screw drivers to open the device, it is not technically ‘user replaceable’ and it possibly voids warranties.
 
  • Like
Reactions: zchrykng
Comment

69Mustang

macrumors 604
Jan 7, 2014
7,868
14,999
In between a rock and a hard place
If Apple informed people of every change that might affect performance in anyway, no matter how minor or how many users it affects, the release notes would be 500 pages long.
To frame your response the way you did (...every change that might affect performance in anyway, no matter how minor or how many users it affects...) implies that you fully understand where Apple went wrong. No one is suggesting Apple inform customer of every change that might affect performance in any way, but you know that already. Sweeping proclamations do little to further a discussion.Each issue is it's own entity and should be handled as such.

Had they informed customers proactively, I believe they wouldn't have had the issue blow up the way it did. Could it have been worse? I don't know... maybe. But I do know what it became... and that wasn't good for Apple. Good for customers who received inexpensive battery replacements, but not so good for Apple.
 
Comment

I7guy

macrumors Penryn
Nov 30, 2013
27,081
15,450
Gotta be in it to win it
Why bring other devices when we're talking about Apple specifically? Wasn't Apple supposed to be different for the better user experience? :rolleyes:
Because there is a reason there is an industry trend toward non-replaceable batteries and it has to do with thinness.(and maybe durability) a user replaceable battery will not make for a better experience.
 
Comment

JosephAW

macrumors 601
May 14, 2012
4,167
5,057
General rule of thumb: whenever a business or politician tells you something they are not doing it usually means that they are doing it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: aylk
Comment

1050792

Suspended
Oct 2, 2016
2,515
3,990
Because there is a reason there is an industry trend toward non-replaceable batteries and it has to do with thinness.(and maybe durability) a user replaceable battery will not make for a better experience.
Because when the phone is being throttled in the Apple side, the ones who started the "trend" as you say, the user is "obligated" to buy a new iPhone or spend the tedious time consuming effort of going to an Apple store they probably don't have in near where they live, to replace the battery. Fear not, Android OEM's don't throttle their phones unlike Apple.
A user replaceable battery definitely makes for a better user experience, I can keep 5 batteries with me and change them during the day, once one dies, I can still keep the phone alive and change the battery. There's no point in your arguments because you're always playing the defensive game, "Mine is bad, but the others is bad too!" that's not how it should work and makes your arguments not having any fundament. We are talking about Apple and what they did was so anti costumer, they got law suited, they made a public statement to apologize to the costumers, they reduced the prices on their overpriced batteries, and they had by laws to inform costumers about possible future slowdowns. Are you brave enough to keep defending this anti-costumer attitude? I guess so...
 
  • Like
Reactions: aylk
Comment

Defthand

macrumors 65816
Sep 1, 2010
1,351
1,711
Apple: We have never -- and would never -- do anything to intentionally shorten the life of any Apple product, or degrade the user experience to drive customer upgrades.

Also Apple: ...nor did we advise customers that changing the battery would restore performance.

The intent was the same.
 
Comment
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.