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macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
55,544
17,892



An Idaho man is suing Apple under California's consumer protection laws because the display on his 27-inch iMac failed 18 months after he bought it -- notably outside the twelve-month standard warranty period, reports GigaOm.

The suit, which refers to a 321-page thread on the Apple Support Community as well as a post on TechCrunch from 2009, asks for more than $5 million in class-action damages and seeks to represent every Apple customer that purchased a 27-inch iMac with an LG display before December 2012.

lemonimac.png
In a complaint filed last week in San Jose, aspiring music teacher Corbin Rasmussen says he thought the iMac was expensive but, relying on Apple's claims that is was "designed for a long productive life," saved up to buy one to use as a home computer and media center,

Rasmussen claims that, after 50 percent of the screen went dim, the iMac became nearly useless for watching movies and made basic web browsing difficult. He complained to Apple, which told him a repair would cost more than $500 since the defect arose after the product's one year warranty expired.

Article Link: Apple Hit With Class-Action Lawsuit Over Failing 27" iMac Displays
 

bmunge

macrumors 6502
Mar 7, 2012
303
350
Sucks for him, but I don't see how he has a case given that it's outside of the warranty period.
 

d0nK

macrumors 6502
Nov 4, 2011
392
209
UK
Hence the reason for consumer law in the UK.
One year warranty is not good enough.
Simple.
 

ranasjsu

macrumors newbie
Sep 4, 2013
6
0
5 Mil?

5 Million $ for what? This is ridiculous.
Why not just take his Screen back and give back his money?
 

kpac

macrumors newbie
Aug 25, 2009
8
0
Considering there is a 320 + pages thread about (what I presume to be) a similar problem with this particular LG panel, my guest is that he has a case...
 

PlutoPrime

macrumors regular
Oct 15, 2009
130
311
I had the same problem as this dude, with the same generation iMac, but Apple replaced my screen free of charge because (per the Apple employee explanation) the failure was a type of failure that was not supposed to happen in the product's lifetime (regardless of warranty status).
 

madcran

macrumors newbie
Aug 22, 2007
27
34
Thats why AppleCare exists. While Apple does have the smallest number of issues with their products versus other PC manufacturers, it does not mean they are all going to last forever. It is still built with consumer electronics that are manufactured by other companies. You take a chance when you do not buy AppleCare.
 

sp3k0psv3t

macrumors regular
Jun 3, 2013
166
212
Miami, FL
Is this guy joking? That stinks his monitor is not working well but it is well past the warranty period.

The A/C on my 4 year old car isn't blowing as cold now as it used to when new - guess I should sue BMW for 10 million lol.

America and these law suit laws seriously need an overhaul so frivolousness can be cut off at the source before tying up court time.
 

La Porta

macrumors regular
Dec 15, 2006
241
0
It was outside the warranty period. It is at their discretion to fix it or not, they have no obligation to do so once the warranty is up.
 

oopl

macrumors newbie
Jan 25, 2009
13
0
I'm glad I didn't have to deal with this issue.
I do agree that 1 year warranty is not enough.
Step up the consumer protection laws U.S.
 

BMcCoy

macrumors 68000
Jun 24, 2010
1,689
3,378
Hence the reason for consumer law in the UK.
One year warranty is not good enough.
Simple.

Yup.

We have the Sale Of Goods Act in the UK, which ensures consumer products must be fit for purpose, and last a reasonable length of time, which is usually around 5 years for small and medium electricals, including computers.

Very surprised that the US does not have similar legislation.
 

JeffiJers

macrumors 6502a
Sep 12, 2012
552
1
U.S.
Not that I agree with the guy at all... I do believe there should be laws implemented similar to Europe's with consumer electronics.

Sure parts deteriorate etc. But known issues such are failure's and for example Image retention should not be put on the customer to pay the bill.

my 2cents.

edit: look a post above mine haha
 

La Porta

macrumors regular
Dec 15, 2006
241
0
What is the relevance of the lemon?

A lemon is a product that is so broken when it is new that it is practically unusable. There are so-called "lemon laws" to protect consumers from new cars that are practically falling apart.
 

davidec

macrumors 6502
Jan 31, 2008
382
392
This guy is a fame seeker but he is within his statutory rights to expect this kind of product to last for years.
 

Andrew Kelly

macrumors newbie
Oct 29, 2013
1
0
Australia Law

I had the exact same problem recently. However we have greater consumer law protection in Australia which meant that Apple had to fix the screen for free even though the warranty had expired 6 months before the problem arose.
 
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