Apple Outlines How Augmented Reality Glasses Could Overlay Points of Interest

Discussion in 'MacRumors.com News Discussion' started by MacRumors, Feb 26, 2019.

  1. MacRumors macrumors bot

    MacRumors

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    Multiple reports suggest that Apple is developing an augmented reality headset or glasses that could be released by 2020 or 2021, and a newly granted Apple patent may provide some broad clues about potential features.

    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Tuesday granted Apple a patent describing a "method for representing points of interest in a view of a real environment on a mobile device," and while there is no specific mention of so-called Apple Glasses, the patent describes a "head-mounted display."

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    As with many other augmented reality devices, the head-mounted display would be able to overlay computer-generated virtual information onto a view of the real environment. More specifically, the headset would have a camera that is able to identify and annotate points of interest and other objects.

    One illustration in the patent shows a head-mounted display showing buildings, each identified with an overlaying label. In another embodiment, an iPhone is shown with detailed information about a specific point of interest.

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    While the head-mounted display looks like a pair of snowboarding goggles, patent illustrations are merely examples.

    Apple files numerous patent applications every week, of course, and many of the inventions do not see the light of day. Patents are also very detailed, encompassing many possible ideas, even ones that Apple might not have any plans to advance. So, the exact implementation if any remains to be seen.

    At this point, it's not entirely clear if Apple is working on Google Glasses-like glasses or a HoloLens-like headset. Apple CEO Tim Cook has expressed more of an interest in augmented reality than virtual reality, however, and the patent does suggest that Apple is focused on augmenting the real world.

    Bloomberg's Mark Gurman has previously reported that Apple's headset will use a custom iOS-based operating system dubbed "rOS" for now. He also said the headset would wirelessly connect to an iPhone.

    Apple has acquired multiple augmented reality startups including Metaio in 2015, Vrvana in 2017, and Akonia Holographics last year, and has hired away employees from HoloLens and similar companies, as it continues to work on the project. In fact, the inventors listed on this patent are former Metaio employees.

    AppleInsider was first to report on the patent being granted today. Apple applied for the patent back in 2017.

    Article Link: Apple Outlines How Augmented Reality Glasses Could Overlay Points of Interest
     
  2. Jyby macrumors 6502

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    I would expect Apple to be curious - but that doesn't mean they will actually make a product... Apple does patent trolling as well.

    I believe great augmented reality glasses will kill off the Apple Watch some day... Maybe even the iPhone.
     
  3. mozumder macrumors 6502a

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    AR & VR are dead as consumer products. They may have some use for professionals, but the general consumer isn't going to wear a device that blocks their mobility.

    Right now the display technology isn't there to make it mobile friendly. There's an extremely limited field-of-view and low resolution in headsets. If a wrap-around light-field display could be made, then it might be possible to use AR/VR.
     
  4. gwhizkids macrumors 601

    gwhizkids

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    Yup. And smartphones were dead in 2005 because no one could invent a means of passing inputs to the phone without a keyboard. Oh...yeah...right...
     
  5. Jyby macrumors 6502

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    How would it block their mobility? AR will augment it...
     
  6. djcerla macrumors 68000

    djcerla

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    #6
    "This will change everything" is an appropriate quote here.

    Just the last stopgap before incorporating computers inside of us. Thankfully, I will be too old to witness that final developement in its full inevitability.
     
  7. mozumder macrumors 6502a

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    They limit your field-of-view and are distracting with lag.

    You wouldn't drive with it.
     
  8. cmaier macrumors G5

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    That's not patent trolling
    --- Post Merged, Feb 26, 2019 ---
    No, AR doesn't limit your field of view. VR does. AR gives you your full field of view, and augments it by superimposing things over some of what is already in your view. People already drive with AR - some cars have heads up displays, for example. Fighter pilots fly with AR helmets. It's fine.
     
  9. fokmik macrumors 68040

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    #9
    Now that can be innovating and useful for the next 10-15 years, not foldable smartphones toys
     
  10. jona2125 macrumors 6502a

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    This is so unbelievably incorrect.
     
  11. 78Bandit macrumors 6502a

    78Bandit

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    Looks a lot like how an app called mTrip did things when I went to Italy back in 2010 and had it on my then-new iPhone 3GS. You would point the camera around and it would bring up overlays about restaurants, points of interest, hotels, and a lot of other information. Not sure how this new patent is different from what was available a decade ago, but I guess that's the patent office for you.
     
  12. mozumder macrumors 6502a

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    Those are attached to very fast on-board computers.

    The AR that Apple would target are likely trying to be fully mobile devices.
     
  13. cmaier macrumors G5

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    So what? How would that effect field of view? It is still superimposing over your vision. Light simply passes through AR glasses the same way as normal glasses. Nothing is blocked just because you have less processing power.
     
  14. Ramchi macrumors 6502a

    Ramchi

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    #14
    Not at all interesting or convincing! We all completely forgot Google Glass, 3D TVs....such eye straining gadget won't go well beyond limited audience
     
  15. cmaier macrumors G5

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    "I don't know what is in the patent, but the patent office must be bad!"

    Here's there patent: http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-...nc".ASNM.&OS=AN/"apple+inc"&RS=AN/"apple+inc"

    Here's claim 1:
    Code:
    1. A method for representing points of interest in an image of a real environment, comprising: displaying, by a display element, an image of a real environment; determining at least one point of interest in the image; determining a position of the at least one point of interest within the image; displaying, by the display element, a computer-generated indicator associated with the at least one point of interest on the image, a location of the computer-generated indicator based on the position of the at least one point of interest; displaying, by the display element, a computer-generated virtual object related to the at least one point of interest at a location based on the location of the computer-generated indicator; displaying a visually perceivable relation indication indicative of a relation between the computer-generated virtual object and the computer-generated indicator; determining a change in position of the at least one point of interest within a second image of the real environment; updating, on the display element, display of the computer-generated indicator based on the change in position of the at least one point of interest; and updating, on the display element, display of the visually perceivable relation indication based on the updated location of the computer-generated indicator.
    mTrip didn't do that
     
  16. scrapesleon macrumors 6502a

    scrapesleon

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    Hopefully it looks like the one in the illustration
     
  17. NMBob macrumors 6502a

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    #17
    I wear glasses. If they were just regular looking glasses they'd be OK. A lot of people already wear sunglasses. If they just looked like regular sunglasses they'd be OK. If they had to be a little different looking for pilots or truck drivers, etc. while they were using them that'd be OK. If there were a Minority Report interface that'd be useful. I just wouldn't want to step into a manhole while reading my email.
     
  18. aylk macrumors regular

    aylk

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    #18
    This will be a hit with consumers, just like 3D TV has been for the past 30 years.
     
  19. citysnaps, Feb 26, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2019

    citysnaps macrumors 601

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    #19
    And now you know why Apple spends $22+ billion on R&D and also produces their Ax series of super-fast processors. Also...pay attention to what Tim Cook said in the past about AR having a big role in Apple's future.

    More hints... When the iPhone X was announced, Cook said the device was (paraphrased) a technology demonstrator, where Apple could bring out and evaluate new technologies that could also be used in the future. Apple's TrueDepth camera system is an outstanding example, even though for the time being it's only front-mounted. Even Animojis, something many of the moan-n-whine crowd get the shakes over, play a role in Apple's AR future.
     
  20. gwhizkids macrumors 601

    gwhizkids

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    I would challenge the assumption that the computing power in an aircraft that was designed a decade or more ago is necessarily faster than an iPhone. The Space Shuttle flew for many years on 1960s era computers.
     
  21. Baymowe335 macrumors 601

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    #21
    Google Glass sucked.
     
  22. MacATDBB macrumors member

    MacATDBB

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    #22
    Kind of surprised this passed prior-art as I'm pretty sure I came across virtually the same thing described in detail 30 years ago in Scientific American.
     
  23. Sasparilla, Feb 26, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2019

    Sasparilla macrumors 65816

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    #23
    This looks good. Want to see what Apple can bring to the table in a couple of years (or whenever).

    We've got the far reaching things like Microsoft's hololens and the very basic things like Google glass, maybe there's room for something in the middle like this. Of course Apple will probably be the only vendor not wanting to do surveillance capitalism of their customers here, so I'm interested that they bring something to the table from that standpoint.

    Don't you have to be able to live demo something to patent it though.
     
  24. DNichter macrumors G3

    DNichter

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    #24
    I can see this having more of an impact than foldable phones. I think as a society, we will move to less looking at screens. It is unhealthy and is starting to be a major problem for the youth. If you can incorporate something like this in a not nerdy looking package, with less consistent intrusion, keep the interactions extremely minimal, but impactful at the same time, I think something like this can bring more value. The hardware and software really has to be perfect though, with just the right level of interaction, and complete privacy protections in place. It would be very surprising to see anything in 2 years, but Apple has been pulling this string for a while now and could certainly surprise me.
     
  25. cmaier macrumors G5

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    #25
    People used to walk around in those around here. They looked like idiots.

    My doctor still uses one (with patient permission). Not sure what it does for her.
     

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