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Apple Providing U.S. Employees With Up to Four Hours Paid Time Off to Vote in November Election

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macrumors bot
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Apr 12, 2001
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Apple is providing all of its employees in the United States with up to four hours of paid time off to vote in the election that will take place on Tuesday, November 3, reports Bloomberg.


Apple today sent out a memo to employees announcing the policy, which applies to retail employees and hourly workers.
"For retail team members and hourly workers across the company, if you're scheduled to work this Election Day, we'll be providing up to four hours of paid time off if you need it to get to the polls," Deirdre O'Brien, Apple's senior vice president of retail and people, told staff. "If they choose, our teams can also use this time to volunteer as an election worker at one of your local polling stations."
Apple says that employees can also use their time off to volunteer as an election worker at their local polling stations.

Other tech companies like Twitter, Uber, and Lyft, are providing employees with time off for voting, as are many other major companies with a full list available on the Time to Vote website.

Article Link: Apple Providing U.S. Employees With Up to Four Hours Paid Time Off to Vote in November Election
 

Apple_Robert

Contributor
Sep 21, 2012
22,652
26,254
In the middle of several books.
Pretty cool of Apple. Just asking, so nobody freak out: wouldn’t the average work shift allow for a person to vote either before or after work?
For many people that would be true. At the same time, it can take a long time (depending on time and area) to vote. There are also a lot of people who don’t work a standard 8hr shift.
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Good on Apple.
I don’t believe it is legal for your employer to fire you over taking time to vote. I don’t have the code in front of me at the moment.
 
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damphoose

macrumors regular
May 12, 2014
178
158
Pretty cool of Apple. Just asking, so nobody freak out: wouldn’t the average work shift allow for a person to vote either before or after work?
Normally I would say yes. But due to covid we are seeing with election that have taken place since March really bad situations. First cities don’t have staff. Polling places relay heavily on volunteers. People who are free in the daytime. Those people are generally retirees. Those are high risk individuals who do not want to put themselves at risk.
In addition many locations are going to be completely closed, meaning traveling further and waiting in longer lines to vote.
 
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martinX

macrumors 6502a
Aug 11, 2009
878
103
Australia
Why on earth is voting day on a Tuesday? Here in Oz, voting is, and always has been, on a Saturday. Polls open at 8 and close at 6. If you can't make it, you can arrange to pre-vote at a post office. In major centres, you can't spit without hitting a polling station. Voting is compulsory, so woe betide an employer that tries to get in the way of that.
 
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FloatingBones

macrumors 65816
Jul 19, 2006
1,324
427
If you’re the kind of guy who thinks it’s reasonable for people to have to wait several hours in line to vote, It’s probably not worth my time trying to convince you otherwise.

Your fallacy is presuming that early voting implies "hav[ing] to wait several hours in line." Can you make a logical argument?

What early voting?

From the Ballotpedia:

As of April 2020, 40 states (plus the District of Columbia) permitted no-excuse early voting in some form.

The list includes California.

Did you look before asking your question?

I’m quite aware that some states have some type of early voting. So screw the citizens of the states that don’t? And even among states that do, some make you jump through certain hoops to qualify for it. Do your own research.

It's forty states that have early voting. Why did you change 40 to "some"???

You asked "what early voting?". You have early voting. Use it.


Your fallacy presumes people DON’T have to wait in long lines.

You know that’s not true, don’t you? Your argument is disingenuous.

What fallacy? I have repeatedly participated in early voting. Never any lines. Here's a hint: do it early in the early voting window.

What exactly are we supposed to "know" is not true? WTF are you talking about?

Can you argue rationally, poison?
 
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citysnaps

macrumors 604
Oct 10, 2011
6,982
11,965
San Francisco
Just make it election week rather than day to make it easier for people.

In California voting is mail-in only. In the last primary we received mail-in ballots roughly one month before the election. Within that 30 day window you can either mail in your ballot, drop it off at designated county offices, or drop it in multiple election drop-boxes in the county.

Very convenient. All ballots have serial numbers and with that number you can track your ballot online.

Also, you can easily register to vote up to and including election day. And, anyone who applies for or renews a drivers license (or state ID card if you don't drive) is automatically registered to vote, if not currently registered.

It's a very nice setup.
 
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crisss1205

macrumors 6502a
Oct 7, 2008
831
129
NYC
Why on earth is voting day on a Tuesday? Here in Oz, voting is, and always has been, on a Saturday. Polls open at 8 and close at 6. If you can't make it, you can arrange to pre-vote at a post office. In major centres, you can't spit without hitting a polling station. Voting is compulsory, so woe betide an employer that tries to get in the way of that.

The election is always on November 4th. By law, all employees have to allow you to take time off to vote.
 
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PickUrPoison

macrumors G3
Sep 12, 2017
8,131
10,719
Sunnyvale, CA
This is a false dilemma. Voters can participate in early voting. Those early voting facilities can have sanitization and isolation measures in place.
What early voting?
This is a false dilemma. Voters can participate in early voting. Those early voting facilities can have sanitization and isolation measures in place.
Your fallacy is presuming that early voting implies "hav[ing] to wait several hours in line." Can you make a logical argument?
Your fallacy presumes people DON’T have to wait in long lines.

You know that’s not true, don’t you? Your argument is disingenuous.
 
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konqerror

macrumors 68020
Dec 31, 2013
2,298
3,693
Why on earth is voting day on a Tuesday? Here in Oz, voting is, and always has been, on a Saturday. Polls open at 8 and close at 6. If you can't make it, you can arrange to pre-vote at a post office. In major centres, you can't spit without hitting a polling station. Voting is compulsory, so woe betide an employer that tries to get in the way of that.

Friday-Sunday is problematic from a religion standpoint. Also, people working on weekends have to be paid more, which doesn't affect just the election staff but people like reporters and pollsters.
 
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PickUrPoison

macrumors G3
Sep 12, 2017
8,131
10,719
Sunnyvale, CA
The election is always on November 4th. By law, all [employers] have to allow you to take time off to vote.
What country are you talking about? If you’re talking about the US, November 4th has nothing to do with anything.

And many can’t afford to lose the $7.25/hr they make, or know that if they take any time off, no matter what the reason, they could lose their job.
 
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