Apple Silicon Macs to Feature New Boot and Recovery Interface, New Mac Sharing Mode Replacing Target Disk Mode

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Apple Silicon Macs will introduce a new system for accessing macOS recovery and security options at startup, Apple explained at a WWDC session on Wednesday.

The new Startup UI on Apple Silicon powered Macs

Existing Macs include a number of macOS Recovery options at boot-up that are accessed using key combinations. For example, Command-R boots Macs in Recovery mode, and Command-Option-P-R resets the NVRAM. On Apple Silicon Macs, these key combinations are being replaced by an on-screen Startup Manager interface.

In the new system architecture, users can hold down the power button on their Mac to access the new startup screen, which features recovery options for reinstalling macOS, as well as options to boot as normal, shut down, and restart.

Apple is also replacing Target Disk Mode, which is used to transfer data between two Macs, with what's called Mac Sharing Mode. Mac Sharing Mode turns the system into an SMB file sharing server, providing another Mac with file-level access to user data. User authentication is required to access the service.

The security modes on Apple Silicon powered Macs

In addition, Startup Disk is a new feature that enables user to select different security modes for startup volumes. Full security, enabled by default, provides the same best-in-class security as enjoyed by Apple's iOS devices and let users boot from an external disk without reducing the security of the system.

Meanwhile, Reduced security mode provides more flexibility by allowing users to disable System Integrity Protection and run any version of macOS, including those that are no longer signed by Apple.

Lastly, Apple Silicon Macs run separate security policies for each OS installation, whereas Intel-based Macs operate on a less flexible system-wide security policy. For more details on this and the other new startup features, check out the full WWDC session on the Apple developer website.

Article Link: Apple Silicon Macs to Feature New Boot and Recovery Interface, New Mac Sharing Mode Replacing Target Disk Mode
 

acorntoy

macrumors 65816
May 25, 2010
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V-l-a-d-i-m-i-r

macrumors 6502
Nov 28, 2012
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But did they say anything about booting to other OSes? It was a question with Windows 10 for ARM in mind. Tens of millions people use Boot Camp, and a good part of this crowd use it daily. So it's a big question, not just some 'private' question. Although, have to tell, I do have some private interest as well, because I'm deeply involved in developing improved Boot Camp-targeted drivers (Trackpad++ drivers for example). I cannot believe Apple didn't say anything about Boot Camp future yet, did they?
 

Stephen.R

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Placeholder graphic or will one of the next Apple Silicon Macs indeed be the MacBook Pro?
The reason several product lines changed name with the Intel shift is because they previously used "Power" in the name, which was a subtle reference to the PowerPC CPUs they used.

They explicitly changed the names to be Mac-centric, not CPU-centric. There's no reason to think those names would change now.
 

jgbr

macrumors 6502a
Sep 14, 2007
662
523
As I said, the macintosh as we knew it will be dead in a few years. The OSX and SJ era Truly over, even if some form of their spirit remains. It was a historic day like 1997.
 

Stephen.R

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Tens of millions people use Boot Camp, and a good part of this crowd use it daily.
I think you're overestimating how many people use BootCamp, and particularly how many use it daily.
- - Post merged: - -

I wouldn't have expected that.
It helps when you stop making assumptions about an entities motivations.
 

jezbd1997

macrumors 6502a
Jul 8, 2015
564
698
Melbourne Australia
But did they say anything about booting to other OSes? It was a question with Windows 10 for ARM in mind. Tens of millions people use Boot Camp, and a good part of this crowd use it daily. So it's a big question, not just some 'private' question. Although, have to tell, I do have some private interest as well, because I'm deeply involved in developing improved Boot Camp-targeted drivers (Trackpad++ drivers for example). I cannot believe Apple didn't say anything about Boot Camp future yet, did they?
Buy a windows machine if you need it..
 

Yebubbleman

macrumors 68040
May 20, 2010
3,038
365
Los Angeles, CA


Apple Silicon Macs will introduce a new system for accessing macOS recovery and security options at startup, Apple explained at a WWDC session on Wednesday.


The new Startup UI on Apple Silicon powered Macs

Existing Macs include a number of macOS Recovery options at boot-up that are accessed using key combinations. For example, Command-R boots Macs in Recovery mode, and Command-Option-P-R resets the NVRAM. On Apple Silicon Macs, these key combinations are being replaced by an on-screen Startup Manager interface.

In the new system architecture, users can hold down the power button on their Mac to access the new startup screen, which features recovery options for reinstalling macOS, as well as options to boot as normal, shut down, and restart.

Apple is also replacing Target Disk Mode, which is used to transfer data between two Macs, with what's called Mac Sharing Mode. Mac Sharing Mode turns the system into an SMB file sharing server, providing another Mac with file-level access to user data. User authentication is required to access the service.


The security modes on Apple Silicon powered Macs

In addition, Startup Disk is a new feature that enables user to select different security modes for startup volumes. Full security, enabled by default, provides the same best-in-class security as enjoyed by Apple's iOS devices and let users boot from an external disk without reducing the security of the system.

Meanwhile, Reduced security mode provides more flexibility by allowing users to disable System Integrity Protection and run any version of macOS, including those that are no longer signed by Apple.

Lastly, Apple Silicon Macs run separate security policies for each OS installation, whereas Intel-based Macs operate on a less flexible system-wide security policy. For more details on this and the other new startup features, check out the full WWDC session on the Apple developer website.

Article Link: Apple Silicon Macs to Feature New Boot and Recovery Interface, New Mac Sharing Mode Replacing Target Disk Mode
Does anyone know the exact title of this session? I want to watch this like a year ago!

Placeholder graphic or will one of the next Apple Silicon Macs indeed be the MacBook Pro?
13.3" MacBook Pro is said to be one of the first to take the plunge. Seeing as, in 2018, the A12X beat out all but the Core i9 15" MacBook Pro that had come out earlier that year (and seeing as that 15" MacBook Pro should still beat out any 13" MacBook Pro or MacBook Air that has ever existed), I don't doubt that will be a good first machine to port over. Plus, given that 13" MacBook Pros and MacBook Airs are both the most popular of all of their computers, it will really put the transition to the test.

I was skeptical at first of a MBP, thinking it’ll be some MBA type machine - but it makes sense for them to deliver pro hardware using Arm so developers take it seriously.

This will help speed up the transition.
Apple has power in their ARM chips to best the Intel equivalent in those machines and anything less powerful. The 16" MacBook Pro, 27" iMac, iMac Pro, and Mac Pro will all take a little more time to get to that point. But within two years, they'll absolutely get there.

But did they say anything about booting to other OSes? It was a question with Windows 10 for ARM in mind. Tens of millions people use Boot Camp, and a good part of this crowd use it daily. So it's a big question, not just some 'private' question. Although, have to tell, I do have some private interest as well, because I'm deeply involved in developing improved Boot Camp-targeted drivers (Trackpad++ drivers for example). I cannot believe Apple didn't say anything about Boot Camp future yet, did they?
If I had to guess, there won't be a "Boot Camp Assistant" anymore. Microsoft doesn't make Windows 10 for ARM64 generally available. It has to be specially licensed for OEMs. What Apple and Microsoft COULD do is make the ARM64 version of Windows 10 available from the App Store such that you pay for it, download it, and the installation that follows would effectively be the Boot Camp Assistant. You wouldn't even have to make a drivers disk or anything; it'd have everything you'd need automagically. They'd price one version with Windows 10 Home and another one with Windows 10 Pro that could be upgraded in-place to Enterprise for those customers and both would be on the Mac App Store. At least, that'd be what I'd do if I were them. I think the bigger question is how are we going to get Windows 10 for ARM64 on Parallels (and is VMware going to actually commit to a Fusion on ARM)?
 
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macmanHEG

macrumors newbie
Feb 14, 2015
18
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Buy a windows machine if you need it..
Why is this always an acceptable answer for you lot?

So now instead of my overpriced Mac I now have to buy two equivalent computers costing double what I needed initially?

Say what you like about bootcamp being under used or no one uses it but come on, options are nice. Especially when we are talking about apple and the apple tax.

I for one hope we get some solution for running Windows, seeing as gaming will be dead that's eGPU use out the window so I won't need bootcamp specifically so I'll take a VM instead.

And don't reply saying buy a gaming pc, that was just one use case of needing windows bare metal.
 

V-l-a-d-i-m-i-r

macrumors 6502
Nov 28, 2012
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Israel
Who remembers Hetfield's "I am the table"?
Somewhat similarly, I could state I am the source :)
To explain: so I develop some drivers and tools for Boot Camp, and counting just two primary download mirrors these have been downloaded millions of times by unique users. Yet it's safe to assume much bigger group of Boot Camp users may not even know about them, because I never truly advertized anything. For example: I don't run any banners, ever. I don't even have any YouTube video on this topic, and neither related social network accounts. But people anyway find and download the drivers. To me personally this situation is an indirect (but still reliable) proof how big the real Boot Camp users community is. As for the daily usage: I have long-term and daily email feedback from people where it's almost always mentioned they use their Boot Camp daily (and really need it).
 

Stephen.R

macrumors 68020
Nov 2, 2018
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Why is this always an acceptable answer for you lot?
Because IMO most Mac users have little need for Windows?
- - Post merged: - -

Possibly the new Mac's will be like iPhones with activation lock and iCloud lock. Makes it harder to buy one used without getting scammed potentially
Also makes it harder for someone to steal your Mac and sell it on. Security works both ways.
 

Glideslope

macrumors 603
Dec 7, 2007
6,383
3,458
A quiet place in NY.
But did they say anything about booting to other OSes? It was a question with Windows 10 for ARM in mind. Tens of millions people use Boot Camp, and a good part of this crowd use it daily. So it's a big question, not just some 'private' question. Although, have to tell, I do have some private interest as well, because I'm deeply involved in developing improved Boot Camp-targeted drivers (Trackpad++ drivers for example). I cannot believe Apple didn't say anything about Boot Camp future yet, did they?
Boot Camp will be going away. I think 10's of millions is a little high. Most colleagues of mine that have a Mac at home with their iPhone's, iPads's and use a Win Box for work, simply bring a work Win Laptop to and from home if they need to access their companies system with a Win Device. Granted, I know more people with iMacs than MBP's.

The only reason for Boot Camp any longer IMO is for the Mac user who also wants to be a "casual" Win PC gamer without wanting a separate box for each. But, that's simply my opinion. :apple:
 

G4DPII

macrumors 6502
Jun 8, 2015
286
332
Poosibility of running older versions of Mac OS may just keep me with Apple for a little longer, depending on the GPU performance we see.

That is a huge plus if you can potentially run any of the Intel specific Mac OS variants.

Will be really nice to be able to stick with Older OS's on new hardware, even with the performance hit, they'll suffer through Rosetta.
 
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macmanHEG

macrumors newbie
Feb 14, 2015
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Because IMO most Mac users have little need for Windows?
- - Post merged: - -


Also makes it harder for someone to steal your Mac and sell it on. Security works both ways.
Yes I suppose for basic users they don't need windows you are right. But as I said options are nice. I mean sure I will shut up if these new ARM macs cost $500 less than the intel ones, then ill happily go buy a windows machine as a stop gap. But otherwise for pros and big businesses windows can sometimes be important if not critical.

As for the security works both ways I totally agree, however as a iPhone refurbisher I tell you now that the way Apple implements these locks is ridiculous. I have no problem with the idea of activation lock, hell I think its great. But when you make it so you can't even contact the original owner to ask if they have sold the phone or if its stolen then its useless. Sure I know people don't want everyone seeing your email address but there are many ways around this. Say what about using one of those apple privacy email aliases? Then we all win. Lost iPhones etc may find their way home and I don't get screwed by job lots of repairable phones (which might I add are all checked against any stolen databases) that are locked.

Anyway going a little off topic there sorry.
 

the future

macrumors 68000
Jul 17, 2002
1,687
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Who remembers Hetfield's "I am the table"?
Somewhat similarly, I could state I am the source :)
To explain: so I develop some drivers and tools for Boot Camp, and counting just two primary download mirrors these have been downloaded millions of times by unique users. Yet it's safe to assume much bigger group of Boot Camp users may not even know about them, because I never truly advertized anything. For example: I don't run any banners, ever. I don't even have any YouTube video on this topic, and neither related social network accounts. But people anyway find and download the drivers. To me personally this situation is an indirect (but still reliable) proof how big the real Boot Camp users community is. As for the daily usage: I have long-term and daily email feedback from people where it's almost always mentioned they use their Boot Camp daily (and really need it).
End of October 2018, Apple themselves said the active install base was 100 Million Macs. Link

Given this official number, it seems absurd to claim that tens of millions of Mac users use Boot Camp, let alone daily.
 

yurc

macrumors 6502
Aug 12, 2016
364
281
inside your DSDT

Meanwhile, Reduced security mode provides more flexibility by allowing users to disable System Integrity Protection and run any version of macOS, including those that are no longer signed by Apple.
This is meant to be desktop computer. Give user MacOS of choice is pretty good decision, appreciated Apple for letting user choose.
 
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