Become a MacRumors Supporter for $25/year with no ads, private forums, and more!

Apple TV tvOS Simulator Shown Running in 4K Resolution

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
51,027
12,565



Developer Steve Troughton-Smith today shared the spoils of his latest hacking efforts by tweeting screenshots of Apple's tvOS Simulator running in 4K - the screen resolution said to be supported in a rumored fifth-generation Apple TV.

tvOS is officially made to run in the standard 1920x1080 HD resolution, but what Troughton-Smith's hack shows is that the Apple TV operating system is perfectly suited to running at double the pixel density (3840x2160), commonly referred to as 4K resolution, thanks to user interface assets like text and icons that are made to scale cleanly given the same aspect ratio.

Hello tvOS@2x pic.twitter.com/EnNdo1xCOY - Steve T-S (@stroughtonsmith) August 8, 2017

The simple scale doubling is reminiscent of the 2x iOS asset resolution requirement that Apple introduced back in 2010 with the arrival of Retina displays, and comes at a time when Apple is rumored to be readying a new, fifth-generation Apple TV capable of streaming 4K video.

Just last weekend iOS developer Guilherme Rambo discovered a reference to a 4K HDR display mode in the HomePod's firmware, which has proved a trove of hints related to Apple's upcoming hardware releases. MacRumors subsequently discovered the string J105a in the HomePod firmware, consistent with the fifth-generation Apple TV's internal codename first revealed by Bloomberg in February. Additional strings unearthed in the code also suggest a forthcoming Apple TV could support both the Dolby Vision and HDR10 color formats for high-dynamic range video.

tvOS Simulator scaled to 2x resolution for 3840x2160

Adding further fuel to rumors of an imminent 4K-capable Apple TV, Apple recently listed selected movies as 4K and HDR in iTunes purchase history. While the content is still only playable in standard definition or HD, the change suggests Apple is preparing to offer the higher definition formats for a new TV box.

The launch date is unclear for a possible new Apple TV, which has been rumored since December 2015, but given the recent uptick in references to 4K resolution by Apple, it's not unreasonable to suggest the company could be readying a release for the new TV box before the end of the year.

Article Link: Apple TV tvOS Simulator Shown Running in 4K Resolution
 
  • Like
Reactions: Sunny1990

Jsameds

Suspended
Apr 22, 2008
3,525
7,986
Experts have found that for you to see a difference between 1080p and 4k, you need a giant 80" TV and sit as close as 6.5 feet.

Short: Nobody needs 4k, you can't see it. It's a marketing gimmick.

HDR on the other hand, makes a real difference.

4K TV owner here. I can see the difference sitting 8ft away from my 55". It's so smooth and gaming jaggies are reduced massively.

Everything you have said was also said when 1080p TVs were new.
 
Comment

Sunny1990

Suspended
Feb 13, 2015
1,660
5,195
This is Good news, I want to try out Apple TV, but had a feeling 4K should be imminent.
 
Comment

mmm1345

Suspended
Aug 8, 2017
507
717
Experts have found that for you to see a difference between 1080p and 4k, you need a giant 80" TV and sit as close as 6.5 feet.

Short: Nobody needs 4k, you can't see it. It's a marketing gimmick.

HDR on the other hand, makes a real difference.

Wow, just WOW. Who are these experts??????

Just because YOU can't see the difference doesn't mean NOBODY can. Your post is everything that is wrong with the internet. Arrogant people commenting on stuff they clearly know NOTHING about.

The larger the display size the better the viewing experience, but that's also true of 1080P. So yes, clearly an 80 inch TV will really show it off, but in REALITY 4K is amazing on TVs generally 50 inch and above. If you watch ANYTHING from 6.5 feet it will look "good."

I personally have a very nice 55 Inch 4K HDR TV and I can say I CAN see the difference. Depending on what I'm watching it is NIGHT AND DAY different and BETTER. So please don't tell me what MY experience is and what I need and do a little research before spreading your "forceful," "self-assured" ignorance.
 
Comment

m.x

macrumors regular
Oct 12, 2014
127
534
It bothers me that this is a big deal. The apple I remember woild have released the ATV 3 in 4k. Multiple years ahead not barely scathing behind.

This is complete nonsense, sorry. So you think they would have released a 4K Apple TV in March 2012?

I was also disappointed that the fourth Apple TV was 1080p only. However, the WWDC keynote showed me that they are clearly aware of 4K, but they needed one big thing to arrive: HEVC. Without it, the bandwidth required to watch 4K would have been too high. Apple states that you need 8 Mbit/s for streaming content in 1080p, while 4K eats up the bandwidth. Roku states that you need up to 25 Mbit/s. That's way too much for Apple standards and the only way to bring it down is by using HEVC. They had to wait for it, and the next Apple TV will be unveiled this fall with 4K content on iTunes, being the first 4K streaming box which has no gigantic requirements for streaming 4K.
 
Comment

MH01

Suspended
Feb 11, 2008
12,107
9,298
Wow, just WOW. Who are these experts??????

Just because YOU can't see the difference doesn't mean NOBODY can. Your post is everything that is wrong with the internet. Arrogant people commenting on stuff they clearly know NOTHING about.

The larger the display size the better the viewing experience, but that's also true of 1080P. So yes, clearly an 80 inch TV will really show it off, but in REALITY 4K is amazing on TVs generally 50 inch and above. If you watch ANYTHING from 6.5 feet it will look "good."

I personally have a very nice 55 Inch 4K HDR TV and I can say I CAN see the difference. Depending on what I'm watching it is NIGHT AND DAY different and BETTER. So please don't tell me what MY experience is and what I need and do a little research before spreading your "forceful," "self-assured" ignorance.

How can you tell ?

I mean, do you have a 55 inch 4K next to a 55 inch 1080P?

I have seen two high quality large TV sets, 4K and 1080P in a store next to each other, and the there was no Night and day difference. Unless I got very close. At normal viewing angles/distance, the difference was minor for me. Money better spend on OLED.

Now take a monitor, which is in your face, 4K comes into its own.
 
Comment

T'hain Esh Kelch

macrumors 603
Aug 5, 2001
5,287
4,996
Denmark
Experts have found that for you to see a difference between 1080p and 4k, you need a giant 80" TV and sit as close as 6.5 feet.

Short: Nobody needs 4k, you can't see it. It's a marketing gimmick.

HDR on the other hand, makes a real difference.
You need to stop reading everything on the internet without being just a tad critical.
 
Comment

kylefsu32

macrumors newbie
Aug 3, 2004
15
10
How can you tell ?

I mean, do you have a 55 inch 4K next to a 55 inch 1080P?

Actually, I did have my 65" 4K TV right next to my 65" 1080P TV when I first purchased the 4K set. It was night and day difference with video that was made for 4K. Even my wife, who will happily watch a old SD show and could care less about HD was amazed.

I do agree that HDR adds even more on top of 4K, but 4K alone is stunning.
 
Comment

bornmann

macrumors newbie
Oct 26, 2013
12
20
Love how the only person talking sense is getting bashed by everyone – even people who think that resolution could benefit a smooth image. LOL. There should be absolutely no debate about 4K and 1080p. Your eye can’t see the difference unless the screen is really close and/or huge. If you think you can see a difference, bravo, that’s how marketing works. Any difference you really see is just years of display technology having developed ahead, and these displays also feature 4K, but it isn’t the thing making everything better.

Do your reading and stop ******** all over people talking sense. https://carltonbale.com/does-4k-resolution-matter/
 
Comment

Jsameds

Suspended
Apr 22, 2008
3,525
7,986
Love how the only person talking sense is getting bashed by everyone – even people who think that resolution could benefit a smooth image. LOL. There should be absolutely no debate about 4K and 1080p. Your eye can’t see the difference unless the screen is really close and/or huge. If you think you can see a difference, bravo, that’s how marketing works. Any difference you really see is just years of display technology having developed ahead, and these displays also feature 4K, but it isn’t the thing making everything better.

Do your reading and stop ******** all over people talking sense. https://carltonbale.com/does-4k-resolution-matter/

I have Rise of the Tomb Raider on PS4 Pro. You can switch on the fly between 1080p and 4K, which negates the "display technology having developed" aspect.

The difference is night and day and no, you don't have to be really close to see the difference.
 
Comment

bornmann

macrumors newbie
Oct 26, 2013
12
20
I have Rise of the Tomb Raider on PS4 Pro. You can switch on the fly between 1080p and 4K, which negates the "display technology having developed" aspect.

The difference is night and day and no, you don't have to be really close to see the difference.
Can’t argue with your scientific test. Congratulations on your superpowers, please use them for good.
 
Comment

Chupa Chupa

macrumors G5
Jul 16, 2002
14,834
7,394
Short: Nobody needs 4k, you can't see it. It's a marketing gimmick.


I remember when the luddites were pounding the table that 1080p media was a gimmick; that upscaling a DVD to 1080i was to the eyes the same thing. You know what -- I can't even look at a DVD now and wonder how there was a time I thought DVD PQ was so amazing that I could never view a VHS tape again.

Nobody needs 4k, maybe. Nobody needed 1080p either. I mean it took years for even 720p and 16:9 to take hold. Actually it took the government revoking the analog frequency licenses and rendering analog TV's more-or-less useless for people to start buying those funny looking rectangle TVs.

Gimmick or not 4K it's fast becoming a standard. 4K sets are not much of a premium anymore and in some sizes it's all that is available. So, yes, people want to watch media in the set's native resolution, and yes, Apple needs a box capable of that if it wants to be in the streaming game.

But the real question is not will Apple push out a 4K ATV this year. That is a foregone conclusion if they want to remain credible in the streaming space, especially being the most expensive box you can buy. The question is will Apple (Tim Cook) be nervy enough to charge a premium for it? Will he jack up the already exorbitant ATV price even more like iPad Air 2 to iPP 9.7?

The savvy move to me would be to kill the competition and set the 32GB 4K ATV at $99. But I wonder if Tim Cook can really see the future for the single $ bills covering his eyes. The ATV is the gateway to the profit center, not the profit center. Simple give away the razor stick and to sell refills concept.
 
Comment

BJMRamage

macrumors 68030
Oct 2, 2007
2,541
939
so, if the TVos is scalable then it could potentially be upscaled to 8K. :O
 
Comment

iMi

Suspended
Sep 13, 2014
1,624
3,197
Experts have found that for you to see a difference between 1080p and 4k, you need a giant 80" TV and sit as close as 6.5 feet.

Short: Nobody needs 4k, you can't see it. It's a marketing gimmick.

HDR on the other hand, makes a real difference.

I think this is true in theory. It makes assumptions about the viewing distance and our ability to see individual pixels. It seems to ignore the cumulative effect of the higher resolution though.

I can clearly see the difference between programming running at 4K versus 1080P on the 65" screen we have. HDR absolutely makes a difference, but resolution does as well. At least to my eye.
 
Comment

X--X

macrumors 6502
Jun 11, 2015
305
1,132
You're joking.. Right?

Wow, just WOW. Who are these experts??????


You need to stop reading everything on the internet without being just a tad critical.

You guys should educate yourselves, before "lol-ing" too much.

1080p HD vs 4k movie and TV content = can't see difference with your home television. Period. (If you're human)

[...] when you’re watching TV in a real-world situation there’s a ceiling to the amount of resolution the human eye can perceive. That ceiling was surpassed when we moved from SD to HD.

A fair and controlled comparison between HD and 4k shows almost no difference for normal TV viewing conditions, and in fact “4k” content often comes from 2k source footage, and almost always has artificial sharpening added to it in mastering — that’s fake sharpening that is (technically speaking) a degradation, but adds perceptual sharpness. The sharpening would look the same if applied to an HD image instead of a 4k image.


MORE HERE: https://theasc.com/articles/a-clear-look-at-the-issue-of-resolution

DEMO VIDEO: http://www.yedlin.net/DisplayPrepDemo/
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Comment
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.