Apple Watch and Radiation

Discussion in 'Apple Watch' started by Hazyb71, Feb 27, 2015.

  1. Hazyb71 macrumors member

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    #1
    We all know we should keep our phones a certain distance from our bodies due to the radiation from WiFi, Bluetooth, and Cellular network connectivity.

    Anyone have any idea regarding how high the SAR would be on the Apple Watch? And whether there should be any concern over the health risks of having such a device on your wrist almost all the time?
     
  2. iamMacPerson, Feb 27, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2015

    iamMacPerson macrumors 68030

    iamMacPerson

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    #2
    The radiation our phones put out is non-ionizing radiation. I'm 99.9999% sure the government wouldn't allow a device that is supposed to be worn on your wrist to output ionizing radiation.

    I'd also like to add this link to cancer.gov: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/causes-prevention/risk-factors/radiation/cell-phones-fact-sheet
     
  3. chabig macrumors 68040

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    #3
    Your skin probably suffers more from the sun than it ever will from a watch.
     
  4. Julien macrumors G3

    Julien

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    #4
    WHY???? Because you read it in some alarmist click bait article. News Flash: All Electromagnetic Radiation (including all light) puts out radiation because it is radiation. This is why it is in the name.
     
  5. User*09 macrumors member

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    #5
    There are some individuals who can feel or experience a little bit more (EMF) than other individuals and their discomfort is real. Some electrified devices may emit a stronger electromagnetic frequency than others. There are FCE regulations that set a standard for all electronic devices and appliances(?). Unfortunately, some individuals still have discomfort that may exceed their tolerance for pain.

    The WHO (World Health Organization) has been researching this for quite awhile now. Although there are no concrete scientific methods for diagnosis and or treatment at this time, studies are ongoing.

    http://www.who.int/peh-emf/publications/facts/fs296/en/
     
  6. slenpree macrumors 6502a

    slenpree

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    #6
    The radiation of wifi and Bluetooth is fairly comparable to a light bulb, but isn't visible because the frequency is not that of one of the "colours" the eyes can "see". The main concern with non-ionising radiation surrounds mobile technology, due to the much higher power required for the signal to go further. which in turn can cause a tissue warming effect and lead onto glucose metabolism anomalies which are still being studied. Since the apple watch does not have a cellular modem, there I no reason to be concerned.
     
  7. Mascots macrumors 65816

    Mascots

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    #7
    Hypochondriacs. :cool: WHO is one of the few organizations who have even batted an eye because they're obligated, but I feel strongly in saying this condition doesn't exist and if it does, it's often within centralized groups of people and can be explained better by sociology & psychology than the effects of some mysterious, scientifically unprovable, or even observable reaction.

    That being said, if true, the actual prevalence of this condition is so extremely limited its not worth bringing up as a counter point to justify the OP. People with connected wearable devices today (and there's a few million or so out there now) have no problem, as evidence. There's more issues with allergic reaction, which is a real condition to be concerned about.
     
  8. Mac'nCheese macrumors 68030

    Mac'nCheese

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    #8
    I wonder if this is what the older brother on Better Call Saul is supposed to have.
     
  9. chabig macrumors 68040

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    #9
    I have long suspected a positive correlation between those who are hyper-sensitive to EMF and those who would seek to ban DHMO. Unfortunately, I don't have the resources to fund my own study nor the influence to get one funded.
     
  10. JayLenochiniMac macrumors G5

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    #10
    Yes, we'll all die 20 years earlier thanks to the Apple Watch.
     
  11. User*09 macrumors member

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    #11
    Well, I can't speak to the prevalence so, I have to out myself as one who is effected by EMF and I am glad that OP brought the subject up. I have been an athlete most of my life, Football, Basketball, Baseball, Track & Field, and Triathlon. I have a pretty high tolerance to pain.

    I began experiencing discomfort in 2008. My hands burn when I type on my laptop. My Incase cover helps me hold my iPad Mini. I carry my iPhone and iPad mini in my leather bag. Wifi is tolerable, bluetooth I use rarely I immediately get headaches so I do what I have to and turn it off, same with my Time Capsule, fluorescent lights are really challenging and there are other challenges.

    You hit on a good point though, sensitivity to EMF for me, is like an allergic reaction, its not lethal but it is uncomfortable sometimes. So, just because you don't believe sensitivity to EMF is a real condition, or is a concern does not mean it is not real or a concern for those who experience it. Just because what I and some others experience cannot be validated by the scientific method does not qualify the discomfort experienced as craziness, hypochondria, or not a "real condition to be concerned about".

    I think that you are lucky that you are not experiencing something that you cannot get relief or help for. To date, this is one of the most challenging things that I have faced in my life. The irony is, I love technology. I want an Apple Watch, but I am aware that once I test it, it my be a no go for me.

    ----------

    Sorry, I don't watch TV, so...I don't know what you are referencing
     
  12. 8CoreWhore macrumors 68020

    8CoreWhore

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    #12
    One three hour flight will expose you to more radiation than a lifetime with the Watch. ;)
     
  13. User*09 macrumors member

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    #13
    Bluetooth can be turned off and turned on when needed thus limiting daily exposure, its the battery proximity that I am concerned with (its small though). And yes, Long flights can be brutal :)
     
  14. Mr. Buzzcut macrumors 65816

    Mr. Buzzcut

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    #14
    But you're comparing a watch on the wrist with a cell radio most keep in a pocket near vital organs. How is this even a conversation let alone a potential problem?

    I think it's interesting that folks who say they are sensitive to wifi radiation only complain when they know there is a device nearby. They don't seem to be able to detect it otherwise from what I've read. I'd like to read peer reviewed studies that prove it is a real phenomenon.
     
  15. User*09, Feb 28, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2015

    User*09 macrumors member

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    #15
    Im not sure if you quoting/asking me a question? If so, Ill answer if no disregard my response:

    I have not drawn a comparison between the Apple Watch and an iPhone. My iPhone is kept in my leather man bag when Im out and about :cool:

    Here is a link of some peer reviews. I have not read it all but it seems pretty thorough in the way of argument as to for/against/indifferent (its not the only source out there people ;o), there are many 756,000 hits "WHO EMF Study"). Those interested can google EMF studies to informe themselves :

    http://www.powerwatch.org.uk/science/studies.asp
     
  16. chabig macrumors 68040

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    #16
    Powerwatch.org touts themselves as a for-hire consultancy group ("providing a consultancy service on a commercial basis"), an political advocacy group ("providing technical input to local Councils and Government"), and sells EMF shielding "solutions" on their web store.

    This is hardly impartial, peer-reviewed, science.
     
  17. JayLenochiniMac macrumors G5

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    #17
    It's simply page with links to articles on pubmed. However, you'll have to look at each journal to determine whether or not it's actually peer-reviewed, and whether or not the authors in a specific article declare competing financial interests (e.g., the study was funded by a grant from a group like powerwatch.org).
     
  18. lke macrumors 6502a

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    #18
    I am very sensitive to radiation and I hope that the Apple Watch don't have that issue

    For example I stop using and disconnect the xbox one kinect system because I could feel the laser beams
     
  19. chabig macrumors 68040

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    #19
    I don't get the sense you're joking but you couldn't be more wrong. Xbox Kinect doesn't have laser beams.
     
  20. Julien macrumors G3

    Julien

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    #20
    So what happens when you cut a light on since a laser is just polarized light? Do you live in a completely dark room.
     
  21. Lennyvalentin macrumors 6502a

    Lennyvalentin

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    #21
    Bluetooth is ludicrously low energy. There's no way it could have any effects whatsoever on your cells. Microwaves in the 2.4 and 5GHz wavelengths can't affect chemical reactions such as those occurring in our cells, the energy imparted is too low, and is mainly absorbed by the body's water content instead, which is harmless. You're far more affected by sitting in front of an open fireplace.

    Why would the battery concern you? There's a teensy-tiny risk it might short and catch fire of course, like with pretty much any lithium galvanic cell, but that's so insignificant you might as well worry your fridge will fall over you and maim you the next time you open the fridge door... So TL: DR: batteries are not a source of EM radiation.

    Airtravel, unlike cellular, wifi and BT radios, actually DOES expose you to actual, real "radiation" (meaning ionizing radiation, coming from the sun and deep space cosmic rays and whatnot), but it is certainly not "brutal" in any meaning of the word. It's a slight elevation of exposure compared to what you'll receive - on average - right here on the ground; air crews often work for decades flying on aircraft with little in the way of ill effects to show for it. Yeah, flying a lot is an increased risk factor for cancer, but it doesn't mean you will actually GET cancer, or that it will be a form of cancer caused by ionizing rays. ;) It could instead be something genetic, or caused by say, your diet, smoking and so on.

    If you live in areas with certain kinds of bedrock (granite for example can have a slight uranium content) or in a home built out of certain kinds of concrete that emits radon, you could receive more than what you'd get from air travel.

    EM sensitivity is psychosomatic, and does not actually exist in real life. There's no scientific evidence that it does exist, and no proper double-blind study ever made has been able to establish any links that it does exist.

    I think maybe the reason people (perhaps like you, I don't really know) react to cell phones and computers and whatnot is because they don't really understand how these devices work, or even how basic, fundamental tenets of our universe itself works. If you don't know how a thing functions, it might seem suspicious or mildly frightening to you. One might therefore mistakenly come to associate something like wifi or cellphones with headaches, or general feelings of unwellness or whatever, and the body would react correspondingly to produce those symptoms if you know you're in the presence of that which worries you.

    This, unlike EM sensitivity, is well established in many medical studies. :)
     
  22. chabig macrumors 68040

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    #22
    Well said. This is how the anti-vaccination movement started.
     
  23. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    #23
    First, hopefully you're aware that the word "radiation" is a general term meaning to spread out. Including stuff like "she radiated happiness" :)

    Likewise, the "radiation" in this case is not even close to the the dangerous ionizing type associated with nuclear sources, etc.

    Here, "radiation" has a meaning more akin to a lamp "radiating" heat, because it's about how an electromagnetic field warms up tissues.

    It's measured with what is called a SAR rating. SAR = "Specific Absorption Rate", or how much energy is absorbed by your body.

    The US has a SAR limit for phones of 1.6 watts/kg.

    An iPhone has a SAR rating of about 1.2 watts/kg.

    A Samsung Gear watch has a SAR of 0.1 watts/kg on the wrist side.
     
  24. Lennyvalentin macrumors 6502a

    Lennyvalentin

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    #24
    This is rather off-topic, but laser light is not polarized light. It's coherent light, IE, the waveforms of all the photons emitted are synchronized so that they oscillate in unison at a single common frequency. This is the reason you can set fire to wood for example at a fair distance using a laser with only say 150 milliwatt output power.

    HTH. :)
     
  25. User*09 macrumors member

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    #25
    I won't know if the battery will be a problem until I can go to the Apple Store and wear the watch for a few minutes. I used to lug my Macbook around in an Incase bag. I would switch which side I cared my bag because the battery caused discomfort after 15-20 minutes increasing dull ache and eventually muscle cramping. I put the bag down and rest a few minutes, the discomfort would go away. It takes longer for that to occur with the iPad. Will that happen with the Apple Watch? Ill know when I test it in store.

    I realize that bluetooth is a low emitting energy, yet It still causes discomfort when I turn it on. So, I only use it when I have to. I never said that it effected my cells, re read my posts.

    I can only speak from my personal experience regarding discomfort associated with electronic devices, and experiences cannot be validated by the scientific method. I don't need to understand how my iPhone, Macbook, or iPad bluetooth works no notice the discomfort I feel when bluetooth is turned on. After 7 years of dealing with this, my best way of describing the experience to those who don't experience discomfort, whether 5Ghz or more, is: its like one of the 5 senses is a bit more sensitive than the average person.

    If you are skeptical, fine, more power to you. I'm not trying to convince you of anything. Just sharing my experience. If you don't experience discomfort with EMF, Bluetooth, and you are not me, how can you say what it is that I'm am experiencing? How can you conceptualize what the sensation is like with regards to my experience? And how does "knowing the basic tenants of the Universe" help me turn on an iPhone or bluetooth, or wifi? I'm not someone who worked as an aircrew person. So how do you know if my bluetooth effects me or not? How do you know if I'm sensitive to the energy emitted from batteries?

    I find your statement offensive. You are insulting my intelligence by insinuating that "If you don't know how a thing functions, it might seem suspicious or mildly frightening to you". I'm not some member of some Amazonian tribe just coming out of the jungle to see society for the first time in 2015. I may be one of, I don't know how many that experience discomfort from EMF, and other things mentioned.

    Does my experience frighten you, because you are unable to comprehend it with your basic knowledge of how these devices work and and your knowledge of the basic fundamental tenants of the Universe? What ever superior knowledge and innuendos you think that you have over me will not change what I experience, no matter how much it confuses and or frightens you.
     

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