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Apple Watch Series 7 could feature a smaller "S7" chip, potentially providing more space for a larger battery or other components.

Apple-Watch-7-Unreleased-Feature.jpg

According to a paywalled preview of a DigiTimes report accessed by MacRumors, next-generation Apple Watch models will adopt double-sided System in Package (SiP) packaging from Taiwanese supplier ASE Technology.

On its website, ASE Technology confirms that its double-sided technology allows for module miniaturization, paving the way for a smaller "S7" chip.

Apple Watch Series 7 models are expected to be released in September, in line with the past several generations of the device. Bloomberg's Mark Gurman and Debby Wu previously reported that Apple has tested thinner display bezels and a new lamination technique that brings the display closer to the front cover. The next Apple Watch could also feature a new flat-edged design and a new green color option, according to leaker Jon Prosser.

Advanced health features like body temperature sensing and blood glucose monitoring have also been rumored for a future Apple Watch, but these features are considered unlikely to be ready for Series 7 models this year.

Article Link: Apple Watch Series 7 May Feature Smaller Double-Sided S7 Chip
 
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nutmac

macrumors 603
Mar 30, 2004
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While lack of additional health sensors is disappointing, the possibility of Apple Watch getting a new design is exciting. I just hope it would maintain compatibility with older bands.
 
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sean.don18

macrumors newbie
Jul 16, 2019
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I work in healthcare and if Apple can add glucose monitoring that proves to be highly accurate and precise then nearly every Type 1 diabetic would purchase one. There's a few non-invasive ones today but they're either not accurate, have to be replaced a couple times a month or both. I'm not diabetic but would love to still be able to track my glucose levels.
 

MacBird

macrumors 65816
Apr 1, 2010
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I work in healthcare and if Apple can add glucose monitoring that proves to be highly accurate and precise then nearly every Type 1 diabetic would purchase one. There's a few non-invasive ones today but they're either not accurate, have to be replaced a couple times a month or both. I'm not diabetic but would love to still be able to track my glucose levels.
Having glucose and blood pressure monitoring would be fantastic but it seems to take a few more years before this is feasible and accurate enough.
 
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xraydoc

macrumors demi-god
Oct 9, 2005
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If the S7 is truly smaller, Apple will definitely not put in a larger battery; they'll instead use this opportunity to make the watch thinner (as they are wont to with everything else) and give us no improvement in what they surely see as already good-enough battery life.
 

DTphonehome

macrumors 68000
Apr 4, 2003
1,813
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NYC
Should be a great time to upgrade from my Series 3!
The difference between my S3 and S5 is huge. I'm personally not going to upgrade to the S7 with the minor rumored changes, but you'll see a big difference. Keep an eye out for deals on the S6 once the S7 is out... I got my stainless S5 for $450 about 4 months after the S6 was released.
 

827538

macrumors 68000
Jul 3, 2013
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I really like my Apple Watch Series 6. I was surprised by how much less I use my iPhone now that I have the watch. If they can add accurate non-invasive blood glucose monitoring (which I'm extremely skeptical they can) then the Apple Watch will probably match iPhone sales, if not exceed them. The O2 sensor on my Series 6 feels like a gimmick to be honest, it's rather inconsistent compared to an oximeter.

I would be prepared to have a small inert implant put in if it meant I had highly accurate readings of things like blood glucose, O2, temperature. My father has to have his blood tested regularly as he is on warfarin for a mechanical heart valve and if he could have an implant synced to his Apple Watch to test for this he would quite honestly pay tens of thousands for it.

I think implanted sensors make a lot of sense and really aren't that big a deal. My father has a mechanical heart valve made of carbon and titanium that clicks away, along with a pacemaker and you would never know it.
 
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