MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
53,579
15,275


There have been a number of reports about Right to Repair legislation across the United States, and an equal number of reports about the lengths that Apple has gone to in order to block new repair bills from becoming law.

apple-independent-repair-program.jpg

Bloomberg today shared a new Right to Repair piece that highlights how Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, and Google have worked to put a stop to laws that would require the tech companies to provide genuine repair parts and device schematics to independent repair shops.

In 2021 alone, 27 states have considered Right to Repair bills, but more than half of those have already been voted down or dismissed. Lobbyists and trade groups representing major tech companies have fought hard against them, with Apple specifically arguing that such laws could lead to device damage or consumers harming themselves when attempting to repair their devices.

In Washington, for example, Washington House of Representatives Democrat Mia Gregerson sponsored a Right to Repair measure that was fought by Microsoft, Google, Amazon, along with lobbyists representing Apple. "If you really want to know who was naughty-it was Apple," said Gregerson. Lobbyists said Apple would endorse repair programs at local colleges if the bill was dropped.

Apple has opposed bills in other states that include Colorado and Nevada. Independent repair shop owner Justin Millman said that he has a difficult time sourcing iPad screens, which are repairs that school kids often need. He claims that Apple opposes repair programs to get people to buy new devices.

"That's why Apple doesn't answer my emails," he said. "For them, it's just dollars and cents. They don't think about the person on the other side of the iPad."

As it fights Right to Repair bills, Apple has attempted to provide alternatives. Apple has launched a worldwide Independent Repair Program that's designed to provide repair shops that are not Authorized Apple Service Providers with genuine parts, tools, repair manuals, and diagnostics for performing out-of-warranty repairs on Apple devices.

The program is free, but repair providers must have an Apple-certified technician perform the repairs, which is a barrier to entry for some shops like Millman's. Even with this program, some parts, like iPad displays, are not provided, leaving Apple and AASPs as the only repair option.

Article Link: Apple's Efforts to Block 'Right to Repair' Laws Highlighted in New Report
 
  • Angry
Reactions: rumormiller

javanate

macrumors regular
May 13, 2005
127
448
A few things:

1) Apple doesn't really repair anything, they just swap out pieces. So yeah, it's expensive
2) I feel like they should just let people break whatever they want, they aren't obligated to fix it after.
3) However, the minute an iPhone burns a house down, there is not a single news agency or law firm that won't blame Apple instead of the repair person.
 

ilikewhey

macrumors 68020
May 14, 2014
2,009
2,391
nyc upper east
i'm gonna post my pass experience to show why right to repair is needed,

couple of years of ago i took my friend's iphone 7 to apple cause it won't turn on, they wanted $360, not to repair, but to replace out of warranty.

i ended up going to a repair shop in nyc(not louis rossman but a friend of his apparently) and after diagnostic turn out one of the transistor that regulates the lighting port burned out, he desoldered and replaced it for 60 bucks. no data was stolen, iphone still work to this day. apple doesn't repair anything nowadays.
 

Lemon Olive

macrumors 65816
Nov 30, 2020
1,101
1,228
Right to repair is dumb. Don't care if its Apple or anyone.

Repairability itself is an antiquated notion. It does not take any of the modern principles of design or recycling or finance into consideration; all of which are huge factors into why products should not be designed to be repaired.
 

MauiPa

macrumors 68020
Apr 18, 2018
2,144
3,039
"He claims that Apple opposes repair programs to get people to buy new devices." Well that is crap. I guess in this day and age you can just make any old crap up and state it as truth. Didn't the last administration change the libel laws so people like that could be sued, promises made, promises kept. LOL

I think the record is pretty clear, if independent repair shops want access to any of this all they have to do is get one or two people trained, not very hard nor expensive. Oh, it may be for the fly-by-nighter shops, here today, screw up some repairs, gone tomorrow. But legitimate professional repair shops, not a problem. There re actually quite a few around where I live.

So please explain why getting appropriate training and certification is a bad thing? You need it for some aspects of automobiles (obviously not changing a tire), but more intricate things that matter to operation and safety. You need it to maintain furnaces, to repair plumbing and wiring, etc, etc, etc
 

Amazing Iceman

macrumors 601
Nov 8, 2008
4,255
2,040
Florida, U.S.A.
In the past I had an iPad display repaired by a reputable third-party company in Boca Raton.
I had to bring it back to them 3 times to get it right.
Eventually, the display stopped working as expected, and parts of the digitizer stopped responding accurately.
This repair was initially $30.00 cheaper than using Apple, but after adding 3 more trips to get it right, plus the short lifespan of the new display, it turned out to be a lot more expensive.

Next time I had 2 other iPad display repairs, I had Apple do it; no issues. I paid a little more, but it was worth it.
 

MauiPa

macrumors 68020
Apr 18, 2018
2,144
3,039
i'm gonna post my pass experience to show why right to repair is needed,

couple of years of ago i took my friend's iphone 7 to apple cause it won't turn on, they wanted $360, not to repair, but to replace out of warranty.

i ended up going to a repair shop in nyc(not louis rossman but a friend of his apparently) and after diagnostic turn out one of the transistor that regulates the lighting port burned out, he desoldered and replaced it for 60 bucks. no data was stolen, iphone still work to this day. apple doesn't repair anything nowadays.
did you try an independent but certified repair shop? Probably have the same result. Its alot like going to a chiropractor or an osteopath, the osteopath actually has a medical degree, some chropractors are good, some are complete quacks.
 

subi257

macrumors 6502a
Sep 13, 2018
708
701
New Jersey
A few things:

1) Apple doesn't really repair anything, they just swap out pieces. So yeah, it's expensive
2) I feel like they should just let people break whatever they want, they aren't obligated to fix it after.
3) However, the minute an iPhone burns a house down, there is not a single news agency or law firm that won't blame Apple instead of the repair person.
1) makes sense....in they don't get repaired on premises. They are most likely ship to a repair depot that has all of the appropriate test and repair jigs. That is the case for most complex circuit boards. I work in broadcast/corporate video and that is how the big brands do it
2) I agree and after they (the consumer or mall kiosk) messes it up and makes it worst will just cost more to fix...could cost almost the price of a new one.
3) unfortunately that is true...as is most of number 2.
 

benwiggy

macrumors 68020
Jun 15, 2012
2,206
33
If your product is a System on a Chip, a battery and a screen that's all fused together into the smallest possible space, then realistically, there's only three pieces you could meaningfully repair. If Apple want to design it so that 'repair' means 'replace it with another unit', then they shouldn't have to change their designs for the 12 people who want lots of bits they can take apart and replace from Radio Shack.
 

ani4ani

Cancelled
May 4, 2012
1,703
1,536
"He claims that Apple opposes repair programs to get people to buy new devices." Well that is crap. I guess in this day and age you can just make any old crap up and state it as truth. Didn't the last administration change the libel laws so people like that could be sued, promises made, promises kept. LOL

I think the record is pretty clear, if independent repair shops want access to any of this all they have to do is get one or two people trained, not very hard nor expensive. Oh, it may be for the fly-by-nighter shops, here today, screw up some repairs, gone tomorrow. But legitimate professional repair shops, not a problem. There re actually quite a few around where I live.

So please explain why getting appropriate training and certification is a bad thing? You need it for some aspects of automobiles (obviously not changing a tire), but more intricate things that matter to operation and safety. You need it to maintain furnaces, to repair plumbing and wiring, etc, etc, etc
Hmm...self evidently true!
 

ani4ani

Cancelled
May 4, 2012
1,703
1,536
In the past I had an iPad display repaired by a reputable third-party company in Boca Raton.
I had to bring it back to them 3 times to get it right.
Eventually, the display stopped working as expected, and parts of the digitizer stopped responding accurately.
This repair was initially $30.00 cheaper than using Apple, but after adding 3 more trips to get it right, plus the short lifespan of the new display, it turned out to be a lot more expensive.

Next time I had 2 other iPad display repairs, I had Apple do it; no issues. I paid a little more, but it was worth it.
So, three iPads and three screen failures...and you still trust Apple?
 

Richdmoore

macrumors 68000
Jul 24, 2007
1,888
317
Troutdale, OR
While I agree with the right to repair, I don't know if I agree with all the provisions of some of these bills.

Why should apple be required to sell original parts to others? I think a better solution is to make it legal to produce 3rd party replacement parts, similar to the auto industry. If the part has some kind of DRM incorporated into it, it should be legal to break or bypass, and be allowed to bypass any patient/copyright issues, so the part can work as a replacement.

How much info should apple and others need to reveal so as to enable others to make clone parts? I am not sure.....

Maybe a compromise would be that either the OEM must provide spare parts for X years, and if they do copyright/patent protections remains in effect, or the OEM can choose not to provide parts, but copyright/patent rights for 3rd party parts become unenforceable. Of course, OEM parts need to be provided at a reasonable cost, and a third party should be able to review the pricing should disputes arise.
 

ArPe

Suspended
May 31, 2020
1,281
3,300
This is dumb. If customers felt they weren’t being served - if they were unhappy with the repair policies - they wouldn’t keep buying from Apple.

Right to repair is backwards thinking. It results in billions of little discarded pieces thrown in trash by consumers and repair shops and all of that polluted the rivers and the ground.

Look how much ewaste PCs produce. Sure it’s cool to build your own PC and fix it but all those dead or old graphics cards end up in the ground somewhere and destroy nature.

But people who support this right to repair are brain dead. They think it is a David vs Goliath fight. It isn’t. It’s a stupid person vs smart person fight.

If you’re producing tons of ewaste you are stupid and don’t give a damn about your own children.

Computers and other devices should be powerful, streamline and efficient and easy to recycle in one process. That’s the Apple way and if anyone wants the worse option go look somewhere else and don’t force your backwards views on Apple.
 

Mrjetsondc

macrumors regular
Dec 17, 2020
123
340
"He claims that Apple opposes repair programs to get people to buy new devices." Well that is crap. I guess in this day and age you can just make any old crap up and state it as truth. Didn't the last administration change the libel laws so people like that could be sued, promises made, promises kept. LOL

I think the record is pretty clear, if independent repair shops want access to any of this all they have to do is get one or two people trained, not very hard nor expensive. Oh, it may be for the fly-by-nighter shops, here today, screw up some repairs, gone tomorrow. But legitimate professional repair shops, not a problem. There re actually quite a few around where I live.

So please explain why getting appropriate training and certification is a bad thing? You need it for some aspects of automobiles (obviously not changing a tire), but more intricate things that matter to operation and safety. You need it to maintain furnaces, to repair plumbing and wiring, etc, etc, etc
Relax dude, it’s an iPhone not open heart surgery. Any person can learn to fix a phone. No need to make a bureaucratic mess with certification.
And no, mechanics don’t have to be certified. In fact that 17 year old changing your oil? Yeah he likely is barely passing algebra.
 

Scipster

macrumors regular
Aug 13, 2020
192
521
They're fighting a losing battle. It will eventually make its way onto statewide ballots as binding initiatives, just like the autobody right to repair bills. What big tech should do is come up with a plan where they help lead the conversation and create a cohesive nationwide framework instead of reacting to voter initiatives and ending up with patchwork of different rules and regulations across the states.
 

ZipZap

macrumors 603
Dec 14, 2007
5,824
1,151
"He claims that Apple opposes repair programs to get people to buy new devices." Well that is crap. I guess in this day and age you can just make any old crap up and state it as truth. Didn't the last administration change the libel laws so people like that could be sued, promises made, promises kept. LOL

I think the record is pretty clear, if independent repair shops want access to any of this all they have to do is get one or two people trained, not very hard nor expensive. Oh, it may be for the fly-by-nighter shops, here today, screw up some repairs, gone tomorrow. But legitimate professional repair shops, not a problem. There re actually quite a few around where I live.

So please explain why getting appropriate training and certification is a bad thing? You need it for some aspects of automobiles (obviously not changing a tire), but more intricate things that matter to operation and safety. You need it to maintain furnaces, to repair plumbing and wiring, etc, etc, etc

So do you know how much it actually costs to get them certified as I suspect its not as cheap as you claim. In addition, certification for what exactly? There are many electronics certifications but Apple wants one more? Apple does not even do board level repairs so what would they be training/certifying...how to talk customers into new devices.

Its all obfuscation on the part of these manufacturers to prevent revenue losses. By revenue I mean they make way more on a new iPhone then repairing.
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.