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Johny Srouji, Senior Vice President of Hardware Technologies at Apple, recently talked about iPhone chipmaking, Face ID security, augmented reality, and more in a wide-ranging interview with Israeli website CTech by Calcalist.

srouji-face-id.jpg

For context, Srouji leads the team responsible for custom silicon and hardware technologies like batteries, storage controllers, and application processors, including the new A11 Bionic chip in the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X.

Apple's control over both hardware and software allows Srouji's team to have a three-year roadmap for iPhone and iPad processors:
"Silicon is unforgiving," Mr. Srouji said. "My team is already working on the chips you're going to see in 2020. You make bets. We have the system and the software. We have better knowledge versus external chipmakers about where things are going to end up. Since we own the silicon, we own the software, the operating system and everything else, we deliver, always. We deliver for the exact specification of iOS and nothing else. We don't have to worry about other operating systems."
Srouji complimented Israel, where he was born and raised, for its significant technological contributions to Apple products. He said Apple now employs over 900 engineers in Israel, up from a reported 700 or so in 2015.

A few years ago, Apple opened research and development offices in Haifa, north of Tel Aviv, with the facilities serving as the iPhone maker's second-largest R&D operations outside of the United States at the time.

There, a team of engineers are focused on chip design, testing, and engineering, according to Apple's job listings over the years.
"The team in Israel is a key part of the overall engineering team in the U.S. and other areas of the world - wherever we have our R&D," he said. "The things they do are key to any device we ship, to all devices."

As examples, he mentioned the A11 Bionic system on the chip powering the new iPhone X, the integrated Wi-Fi Bluetooth chipset in and the Apple Watch, and the storage component in every Apple device.

"We depend on the team as part of the overall R&D team in the U.S. and other parts of the world to deliver," Mr. Srouji said. "And if they don't--bad things happen, alright?"
Apple has also acquired several Israeli companies over the years, including PrimeSense, which developed the original Kinect sensor for Xbox. PrimeSense's 3D sensing tech is believed to be at the core of Face ID on the iPhone X.

Apple later scooped up Israeli startup LinX, whose dual-lens camera technologies are likely used in the latest iPhone models. It also bought Israeli flash memory firm Anobit Technologies and facial recognition startup RealFace.

Srouji added that Face ID is the fastest and most secure facial recognition system in the industry. He also said 3D masks shouldn't be able to spoof Face ID, although a questionable video may have proved otherwise just days later.
"When Apple delivers Face ID, we deliver it in the fastest, smartest, and most secure way," he said.

"If I want to spoof and create some 3D model mask of your face--it shouldn't work. When Apple does it you know it's going to be the most secure, reliable and fastest, and if it doesn't work there is a reason. The other thing about Face ID is that actually, we learn. We learn to adapt--if you grow a beard, if you have sunglasses, if you have eyeglasses, a hat--it works."
Full Interview: Silicon is "Unforgiving," Says Apple's Chip Chief Johny Srouji

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

Article Link: Apple's Silicon Chief Talks About iPhone Chips, Face ID, and More in Israeli Interview [Updated]
 
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deany

macrumors 68030
Sep 16, 2012
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He looks like David Byrne's twin brother, Talking Heads:

And you may ask yourself
How do I work this?
And you may ask yourself
Where is that large automobile?
And you may tell yourself
This is not my beautiful house!
And you may tell yourself
This is not my beautiful wife!
And you may ask yourself
Why is the iPhone X so damm expensive!
David-Byrne-01-05-17-616x440.jpg
 
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tipoo

macrumors 6502
Jan 5, 2017
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One can't dispute the talent of his team. Other flagships are only just slimly beating the iPhone 7 in multicore, and are still about half of that in single core, while the 8/x bounded ahead again. Can't wait to see more future work from them.
 

augustya

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Feb 17, 2012
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What about the small twin kids who unlocked the iPhone X using each other's face to register and then unlock in the Wall Street Journal video ?
 
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ph001bi

macrumors 6502
May 26, 2015
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Johny Srouji, Senior Vice President of Hardware Technologies at Apple, recently talked about Israel's contributions to Apple products, Face ID security, augmented reality, and more in a wide-ranging interview with Calcalist.

srouji-face-id.jpg

For context, Srouji leads the team responsible for custom silicon and hardware technologies like batteries, storage controllers, and application processors, including the new A11 Bionic chip in the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X.

The interview was published in Hebrew, so the quotes herein are loosely translated to English and may not be perfectly word for word.

Srouji started by complimenting Israel, where he was born and raised, for its significant contributions to Apple products. He said Apple now employs over 900 engineers in Israel, up from a reported 700 or so in 2015.

A few years ago, Apple opened research and development offices in Haifa, north of Tel Aviv, with the facilities serving as the iPhone maker's second-largest R&D operations outside of the United States at the time.

There, a team of engineers are focused on chip design, testing, and engineering, according to Apple's job listings over the years.

"The things we do in Israel are a significant part of every Apple device in the world," said Srouji. He went on to say "the team in Israel is part of this long-term vision of excellence and perfection, so we're here for the long term."

Apple has also acquired several Israeli companies over the years, including PrimeSense, which developed the original Kinect sensor for Xbox. PrimeSense's 3D sensing tech is believed to be at the core of Face ID on the iPhone X.

Apple later scooped up Israeli startup LinX, whose dual-lens camera technologies are likely used in the latest iPhone models. It also bought Israeli flash memory firm Anobit Technologies and facial recognition startup RealFace.

The interview later shifted to Face ID, which Srouji said is "the fastest and most secure" facial recognition system in the industry.

"Take the subject of user attention for identification," said Srouji. "If I am not fully aware of the device--i.e. looking at it with my face directly--there is no detection." He told the interviewer "you have to be happy about it because imagine you have the phone and I go aside and I can create a fake of it."

Srouji also reflected on Apple's new augmented reality platform ARKit. He said Apple is always looking far ahead with its chip designs, with a three-year roadmap leading into 2020. Read the full interview for his complete vision.


Article Link: Apple's Head of Chip Design Talks About Face ID Security and More in Israeli Interview
This guy is a brilliant mind and, he’s an Arab Christian which goes to show that, contrary to popular beliefs, opportunities in Israel are not limited by race and/ or religion.
[doublepost=1510673708][/doublepost]
It's "Johny Speak."
He didn’t say “Aluminium”.
 

mi7chy

macrumors G3
Oct 24, 2014
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The interview later shifted to Face ID, which Srouji said is "the fastest and most secure" facial recognition system in the industry.

False. Windows Hello passes evil twin test and is more resilient against masks unlike Fake ID. That's no surprise, though, since Fake ID is using 2010 Kinect technology that Microsoft dumped for a better inhouse solution.

 
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DTphonehome

macrumors 68000
Apr 4, 2003
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"The things we do in Israel are a significant part of every Apple device in the world," said Srouji. He went on to say "the team in Israel is part of this long-term vision of excellence and perfection, so we're here for the long term."

Chew on that, BDS folk. Willing to bet a large percentage of them are using Apple gear (and the rest must be using Intel or other Israel-designed tech).

Also, Sruji is Arab and a graduate of Technion Institute. So much for apartheid.
 

err404

macrumors 68030
Mar 4, 2007
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Was this claim of industry's fastest and most secure facial id technology before or after it was revealed that the Facial ID was cracked by wearing a mask?
It still is the most secure in the very limited field of face recognition. Details of the hack are very limited and many things about that video seem scketchy. We have no idea how practical the method actually is. For example how the face was initially registered (was he wearing a ski mask, was the mask actually registered instead of his face, and how many tries did this takes. The angle seemed very picky, hence the rig used for the phone and mask).
At a minimum the effort was far higher than prior hacks with fingerprints, faces or even iris scans.
 
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Jsameds

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Apr 22, 2008
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One can't dispute the talent of his team. Other flagships are only just slimly beating the iPhone 7 in multicore, and are still about half of that in single core, while the 8/x bounded ahead again. Can't wait to see more future work from them.

I was told by someone on Engadget the other day that the A-Series of chips aren't innovative.

All I could do was laugh in his face.
 
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Jsameds

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Apr 22, 2008
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False. Windows Hello passes evil twin test and is more resilient against masks unlike Fake ID. That's no surprise, though, since Fake ID is using 2010 Kinect technology that Microsoft dumped for a better inhouse solution.


Looks like it might not be as secure as Apple had hoped:

http://www.securityweek.com/iphone-xs-face-id-bypassed-mask

This 'mask' thing has been debunked on so many levels now I laugh when people bring it up.
 

asleep

macrumors 68040
Sep 26, 2007
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"Take the subject of user attention for identification," said Srouji. "If I am not fully aware of the device--i.e. looking at it with my face directly--there is no detection." He told the interviewer "you have to be happy about it because imagine you have the phone and I go aside and I can create a fake of it."

Huh?

Can anybody interpret this for me?
 
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