ARMacs prices?

magbarn

macrumors 68020
Oct 25, 2008
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I don't believe there will be any price drops. Just look at iPad Pro pricing for example. By the time you add a Magic Keyboard to a 12.9 iPP, you're already at $200 more than the equivalent 256gb 2020 MBP 13's price. Even if you went for the folio, you're still above the MBP and the MBA's asking price.
iPP may have a more expensive to manufacture screen, but the chip should be much cheaper than Intel's as it's in house.
Prices stay the same.

Apple should also be able to spread the R&D cost as the A14/A15 and future generations will be likely using the same core from the iPhone to the MacBook Pro likely just different number of cores.
 

johannnn

macrumors 68000
Nov 20, 2009
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Sweden
what do you think about ARMacs future prices? I assume that should be cheaper to produce as I expect everything to be integrated, non user replaceable memory nor disk. And they could reuse a lot of its current infrastructure for the mobile devices. The other thing is if Apple wants to reflect this on final prices...
How would they be cheaper? Do you have any idea how many millions they spent on R&D? To just calculate the part price is ridiculously stupid.
 
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Tafkaeken

macrumors newbie
Oct 6, 2018
5
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I doubt prices will change dramatically. Apples prices are really well thought out with partly overlapping categories. It isn’t really a question on margins, it’s careful price work.

As an example on how this price/performance upgrades work, my hunt for a new computer started with a MacBook Air and has passed through the pro in various specs. Now I had almost decided for a new iMac but would really like an ARM so I might wait.
I could definitely see a cheap entry level machine perfect for schools and universities though.
 
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danfrumkin

macrumors newbie
Aug 1, 2011
21
3
A change like this isn’t about price. Probably will stay the same the price points are pretty consistent over the years.

The benefit is that the millions of apps on IOS will come to Mac and a few of them are good. Since development will be easier Mac and iOS users will get more for the same.

so this is really good for Mac users. More apps more development. Mac has been falling behind pc and iOS. now Mac, iOS and Apple TV will all be on the same code base. And Apple will have almost unified development. This can’t happen in Android and Windows, not soon, maybe not forever.

this is not about price or performance. It is about the Apple platform.
 

Tekguy0

macrumors 6502
Jan 19, 2020
252
246
They would have to target their bottom lines and cover the cost for R&D for new chips coming down the pipelines. I assume they will be manufacturing the chips in the US or out of country like China?
Probably in the US or Taiwan. TSMC just opened a US factory, and all the systems to do the fabrication come from the US or the Netherlands.
 

bastifantasti

macrumors newbie
Sep 26, 2009
6
1
I think the entry level models will be much cheaper. I am sure when Apple moved to Intel, I upgraded from an iBook to a MacBook, and brand new it was like £700. Then very quickly over the coming years most of their products were back to being above £1000 - or am i looking back with rose tinted glasses?
 
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TrueBlou

macrumors 68040
Sep 16, 2014
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Scotland
Not if you spec with reasonable SSD and ram.
Yeah, once you pimp it out, you’re really into the, MacBook Air, or MacBook Pro dilemma. Well, I say that, I went for the Air in the end for one simple reason - function keys.

Yup, I hate the Touch Bar that much, I had a completely speced out MBP 15 with Touch Bar and sold it 6 months later. Sure you can make the TB have the function keys on it, but it just can’t replicate the tactility of actual keys - yet.
 
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robbieduncan

Moderator emeritus
Jul 24, 2002
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Harrogate
I think the entry level models will be much cheaper. I am sure when Apple moved to Intel, I upgraded from an iBook to a MacBook, and brand new it was like £700. Then very quickly over the coming years most of their products were back to being above £1000 - or am i looking back with rose tinted glasses?
iBook G4 1.33Ghz 12" Mid 2005 : £699
MacBook CoreDuo 1.83Ghz 13" 2006 : £749

So yes: rose tinted glasses I'm afraid. Sure the MacBook was dual core, larger screen etc. But it was more expensive than the base iBook it replaced, not cheaper
 

Moonjumper

macrumors 68020
Jun 20, 2009
2,265
1,951
Lincoln, UK
It depends on the performance of the Arm chips. I expect an improvement in the performance a user gets at a price point.

I also think the Arm processors will allow more flexibility in the form factors as Apple can make chips around what they want. We may see some new models that are cheaper, perhaps the return of the MacBook, and a tiny Mac Nano model.
 

Mr. Dee

macrumors 68020
Dec 4, 2003
2,396
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Jamaica
Did prices change when they switched from PPC to Intel? Nope, I expect it to be the same or even more expensive.
 

ruka.snow

macrumors 6502
Jun 6, 2017
419
1,048
I don't see prices going down. I see new and exciting form factors not possible before and 30 hour battery life laptops, then I see a iMac Pro as thin as an iPad Pro with a mini LED display that has doesn't make a sound and they talk about how this thin piece of glass can edit 5 steams of 8k video and add effects at only 50c.
- - Post merged: - -

iBook G4 1.33Ghz 12" Mid 2005 : £699
MacBook CoreDuo 1.83Ghz 13" 2006 : £749

So yes: rose tinted glasses I'm afraid. Sure the MacBook was dual core, larger screen etc. But it was more expensive than the base iBook it replaced, not cheaper
A wee bit more expensive but it was also 5.5X faster if I recall.
 

Tekguy0

macrumors 6502
Jan 19, 2020
252
246
How would they be cheaper? Do you have any idea how many millions they spent on R&D? To just calculate the part price is ridiculously stupid.
Apple spends OVER $1.2B a month on R&D, and the vast majority of that was probably going to ARM chips for Mac, as most other products are just getting refinements.
- - Post merged: - -

I could definitely see a cheap entry level machine perfect for schools and universities though.
The only thing that has any chance of competing in the education sector is the base model iPad, and only when its on sale. Schools pick up durable, cheap-to-fix, and most importantly, highly manageable Chromebooks for a little over $100, so an iPad that is more prone to breakage and can do less "important" work without accessories is a hard sell, at least to public schools.
 

MecPro

macrumors 6502
Mar 6, 2009
430
89
London
0 price drop

They money they’d save will go into R&D,wages, etc.I doubt they’re saving any Mo eh during this transition. Probably expending more.
 

ApplesAreSweet&Sour

macrumors newbie
Sep 18, 2018
3
1
Changes I expect to see: A lot more frequent releases options with "lines" of desktops and laptops that look more like future iPhone and iPad releases, both in terms of design and pricing. One low-end, one mid-range and one high-end.

The new designs have to signal that the computers are all Apple now so I expect them to look and operate much more like iOS devices than ever before.

Changes I don't see happening: Drastic deacreases or increases in pricing. Yes, Apple will eventually make when more per device sold. But no company in their right mind would lower their prices if their target demographic is gonna keep buying new computers almost no matter how high the price.

Love or hate it, Apple has created their own indirect monopoly and can and do charge much more than most other tech brands.

Apple's "cheap" products like the entry level iPad or SE 2nd gen are only lower priced because of significant cuts on features that you only see in their flagship and "Pro" lineups.

If there we see any "cheaper than Intel"-ARM Macs then they'll be non-user-upgradeable and will lack in key areas that creatives and pros would need, like proper GPUs or high amounts of RAM and internal storage like we saw in the 2018 Mac mini.

A cornerstone in Apple's image is always having a line of powerful, excessively well-designed and attractive looking designs aimed at professionals and creatives, computers that also are priced way above nearly any other brand. This has been a part of their marketing even before the iPod and iPhone happened and I don't see this changing.
 
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Razeus

macrumors 603
Jul 11, 2008
5,250
1,917
I expect them to stay the same or go higher. Intel had the advantage creating supply across Windows, Mac, and servers. Mac themselves don't have the scale necessary to keep chip prices low.
 

throAU

macrumors 603
Feb 13, 2012
6,336
3,782
Perth, Western Australia
what do you think about ARMacs future prices? I assume that should be cheaper to produce as I expect everything to be integrated, non user replaceable memory nor disk. And they could reuse a lot of its current infrastructure for the mobile devices. The other thing is if Apple wants to reflect this on final prices...
I suspect prices will either drop, or you'll get a LOT more performance for the money.

Intel want like $300 for the CPU (In lots of 1000 for OEMs) in the MacBook Airs and 13" Pros.

that's the price of an entire fracking IPAD which will outperform it. Whether Apple drop the price or you just get more performance than the equivalent windows machine by a long shot remains to be seen, but in either case I expect the VALUE proposition to get a lot better.
 

RumorConsumer

macrumors 6502a
Jun 16, 2016
970
527
For what its worth, nobody on here has the foggiest idea what Apple is thinking about prices or money. Can't wait to see what they do.
 
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MacOH21

macrumors member
Feb 15, 2018
87
296
You'll pay the early adopter premium on the first few mac's running Apple silicon.
 

tinman7162

macrumors newbie
Mar 29, 2012
6
1
Current ASP according to Intel from their financials is around $300 per cpu so while it's easy to speculate on what deals OEMs get from intel, we know they're paying an average of $300 per cpu. Retail sales are tiny compared to OEM sales so that doesn't change ASP much. There is no such thing as buying a retail mobile cpu from intel. Bulk of intel sales are for lower end cpus in laptops which drives the ASP down. Apple doesn't use any cheap intel cpus so based on ASP they are paying more than $300 for each cpu.
I'm not real good with math, but it has been reported that Intel sells Apple about $3.4 billion worth of chips a year. Apples sells around 18 - 19 million Macs a year. So I would think Apple pays somewhere between $178 - $190 per cpu. Of course intel probably provides Apple with more than just CPUs, so the price may actually be even lower.
 
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