Base and Middle Tier Mac Pro Models Offer CPU Performance Similar to iMac Pro

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Geekbench 5 benchmarks of some of the new Mac Pro processor options are now available, giving us an idea of how the Mac Pro performs relative to other Apple machines.

Based on the available scores, the 8-core, 12-core, and 16-core Mac Pro processors offer performance similar to the processors in the 2017 iMac Pro models.

8-core 2019 Mac Pro vs. 8-core 2017 iMac Pro​

The base Mac Pro with an 8-core Xeon W chip has a single-core score of 1008 and a multi-core score of 7606, which is beaten out by the 8-core 2017 iMac Pro's single core score of 1076 and multi-core score of 8120.

Similar scores can also be seen in the higher-core Mac Pro models as well. The 12-core Mac Pro earned a single-core score of 1090 and a multi-core score of 11599, while the 16-core machine earned a single-core score of 1104 and a multi-core score of 14285.

Geekbench 5 single-core Mac scores (8-core model not pictured here but ranking can be seen in full chart)​

The 16-core processor in the Mac Pro does win out over the 18-core processor in the 2017 iMac Pro when it comes to both multi-core and single-core performance, but there's not a huge difference in score.

In single-core performance, the new Mac Pro models are outshined by many of Apple's 2019 Macs, especially when it comes to the lowest-end 8-core machine. The higher-end 2019 MacBook Pro models (13, 15, and 16-inch), the high-end Mac mini, and 2019 iMac models all beat out even the 16-core machine when it comes to single-core scores.

In multi-core performance, it's only the iMac Pro models and the high-end iMac that outshine the 8-core Mac Pro, while 12-core and 16-core models are close to the top of the chart.

Geekbench 5 multi-core Mac scores​

Though the base and middle tier models offer performance that's fairly similar to the performance you get from many of the 2017 iMac Pro models, the upgradeability and expandability of the Mac Pro should not be overlooked.

Every component is modular and can be improved and upgraded after purchase, with RAM upgrades, SSD upgrades, and GPU upgrades all possible, unlike the iMac Pro.

When it comes to the higher-tier 24 and 28-core processor options in the Mac Pro, we can expect to see performance that far exceeds what's possible with an iMac Pro as the 2017 iMac Pro tops out at the 18-core Xeon processor option.

Article Link: Base and Middle Tier Mac Pro Models Offer CPU Performance Similar to iMac Pro
 
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dmylrea

macrumors 68030
Sep 27, 2005
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So not really worth it if you already have an iMac Pro. I hope Mac Pro buyers will be able to put the next generation Xeons into this motherboard. Don't know how realistic it is to expect that.
If Apple comes out with new models with new processors, then yes, you can probably change the CPU yourself (assuming Apple doesn't use specific CPU's that aren't available publicly). While many parts are replaceable, I would guess they would have to be Apple-branded or "Authorized Apple".
 
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jmgregory1

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I'm willing to bet that Apple is already testing an A series version of the Mac Pro. The numbers Intel is getting out of their chips seem to be minor advancements, at least compared to how quickly Apple has progressed with their A series chip and more recently their GPU's. And you know that Apple hates having to rely on a company like Intel.
 

daveedjackson

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Aug 6, 2009
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If Apple comes out with new models with new processors, then yes, you can probably change the CPU yourself (assuming Apple doesn't use specific CPU's that aren't available publicly). While many parts are replaceable, I would guess they would have to be Apple-branded or "Authorized Apple".
Ifixit today said there is no reason the processor can’t be changed. But needed further investigation. It’s just a standard socket.
 
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sbrunner

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Jun 11, 2015
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I find the overlap interesting, the MBPs 2019 are within 10% margin as fast as the 8-core Mac Pro. With an eGPU (perhaps a Vega VII), we would see comparable performance. This does not make the Mac Pro slow, but the MBPs fast.
 

terandle

macrumors member
Apr 23, 2015
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Actually, I think it will be even earlier than that. Like as in half the time you originally predicted. At least I sure hope so anyway 😁
Everyone is predicting an ARM transition but is Apple really going to make server CPUs with support for ECC RAM, a ton of TB3 lanes, etc and force all the software vendors to build for ARM? I don't really see how that investment makes sense for Apple for processors that are more power efficient in a chasis that is already built to handle massive power draws.