Buyer's Guide: Mac Sales Begin Ahead of Black Friday

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
47,600
9,383



The holiday season has become more relevant for those looking for a discount on Apple computers as there has been an increasing number of vendors willing to hold short term sales/rebates on Macs over the past few years.

Due to a variety of circumstances, this year's holiday season is likely to be particularly strong for Mac sales. Apple has recently revised the iMac, Mac mini, and MacBook, while the MacBook Pro revisions are only 5 months old -- and without an Apple attended Macworld looming in January, there is a low likelihood of any imminent updates to most of the Mac product line.

MacMall is kicking off early with a weekend sale that incorporate instant discounts as well as mail-in rebates across Apple's current lineup. This particular sale ends on Sunday at 11:59pm Pacific Time, and the Mac line-up is organized in this table. As an affiliate partner, sales through these links benefit this site directly.

Click on prices to link directly to product.
* Additional discount applied at checkout.​

Apple, themselves, will likely also hold a Black Friday sale both online and at their retail stores, though their discounts have always been very modest. Like last year, we'll organize the most interesting sales for a Black Friday summary.

Article Link: Buyer's Guide: Mac Sales Begin Ahead of Black Friday
 

Eidorian

macrumors Penryn
Mar 23, 2005
29,085
288
Indianapolis
I got several e-mails about Black Friday offers that were starting today.

I'm not surprised since there were deals on clothing back in Late October that rivaled Black Friday deals.
 

hazedragon45

macrumors regular
Oct 23, 2009
126
0
I guess these are just Student Discounts that everyone gets? What about students? do they get a lower price?
 

zey

macrumors newbie
Jan 18, 2009
19
0
Just removed my post. Missed the bit where the forum turned into MacMall Rumours :/
 

dubious1

macrumors newbie
Nov 13, 2009
1
0
These prices aren't anything special

These are very close to the macconnection prices and after the free shipping not even as good in all cases.:(
 

doobs22

macrumors member
Sep 24, 2009
60
3
Redwood City, California
Macbook vs. Macbook Pro

it makes absolutely no sense to get a 13inch macbook pro right now.:mad:

since the last macbook update they both have the same basic configuration:
* 2.26GHz or 2.53GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processor with 3MB on-chip shared L2 cache running 1:1 with processor speed
* 1066MHz frontside bus
* 2GB (two 1GB SO-DIMMs)
* battery (and battery life)
* lcd display

and the pricing:
macbook $999.-
macbook pro $ 1199

an extra $200 for a backlit keyboard? No Thanks !
 

doobs22

macrumors member
Sep 24, 2009
60
3
Redwood City, California
it makes absolutely no sense to get a 13inch macbook pro right now.:mad:

since the last macbook update they both have the same basic configuration:
* 2.26GHz or 2.53GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processor with 3MB on-chip shared L2 cache running 1:1 with processor speed
* 1066MHz frontside bus
* 2GB (two 1GB SO-DIMMs)
* battery (and battery life)
* lcd display

and the pricing:
macbook $999.-
macbook pro $ 1199

an extra $200 for a backlit keyboard? No Thanks !
my mistake. The 2.53GHz processor is only available on the Macbook Pro
 

rubenerd

macrumors newbie
Dec 10, 2006
19
1
s/Singapore/Sydney/
I still keep holding out for an upgrade that'll blow the socks off what I already have, to be honest my Core Duo MBP still does everything well enough, albeit slower for video editing and the 2GiB RAM ceiling is frustrating for VMs.

My fanciful sig may say otherwise, but to be realistic a Core i5/i7/i9/iWhatever MBP might be just enough of an upgrade for me to justify. Right now, these offers don't seem enough.
 

Surely

Guest
Oct 27, 2007
15,042
8
Los Angeles, CA
I can still get a better price than this at the UCLA Store. For example, I can get the 13" 2.26GHz MacBook Pro for $1,049.

Still, it's good to see some discount action......


9.75% sales tax in CA ruins every good price.
 

Sargiel

macrumors member
Jan 2, 2005
77
0
West Sussex, England
I wish we had 9.75% sales tax in the UK! Try 15% going back up to 17.5 % in January 2010.

When I bought my current iMac I paid £261.97 (approx $435.84 USD) in VAT/Sales Tax. However I can't say it feels expensive as that's what we're used to. Less would be good though ;)
 

baryon

macrumors 68040
Oct 3, 2009
3,490
1,387
Can someone tell me what this "Black Friday" is? Did something bad happen? Or what? And why is it related to discounts? Does it exists in the UK? Thanks.
 

RiverFox

macrumors member
Sep 25, 2007
62
0
Ione, CA
"Black Friday" is the Friday after Thanksgiving (US). It it called so because it's 1st 'official' shopping day for the Christmas season. In financial terms, "red" means a negative value, where "black" is considered revenue - such is the case where retailers both gauge sales on that day and turn a profit.

From the Wiki : ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Friday_(shopping) )
Black Friday is a term for the Friday after Thanksgiving in the United States, which is the beginning of the traditional Christmas shopping season. Because Thanksgiving falls on the fourth Thursday in November in the United States, Black Friday occurs between the 23rd and the 29th of November.

Black Friday is not an official holiday, but many employees have the day off (with the exceptions of those employed in Retailing and Banking), which increases the number of potential shoppers. Retailers often decorate for the Christmas and holiday season weeks beforehand. Many retailers open extremely early, with most of the retailers typically opening at 5AM or even earlier. Some of the larger retailers (depending on the location) such as Sears, Macys and Walmart have been reported to open as early as midnight on the start of Black Friday in localized areas and remain open for 24 hours throughout the day until midnight the following Saturday. Upon opening, retailers offer doorbuster deals and loss leaders to draw people to their stores. Although Black Friday, as the first shopping day after Thanksgiving, has served as the unofficial beginning of the Christmas season at least since the start of the modern Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in 1924, the term "Black Friday" has been traced back only to the 1960s.

The term "Black Friday" originated in Philadelphia in reference to the heavy traffic on that day (see Origin of the name "Black Friday" below). More recently, merchants and the media have used it instead to refer to the beginning of the period in which retailers go from being in the red to being in the black (i.e., turning a profit).
And there is Cyber Monday : ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyber_Monday )
The term Cyber Monday refers to the Monday immediately following Black Friday, the ceremonial kick-off of the holiday online shopping season in the United States between Thanksgiving and Christmas. [1] Whereas Black Friday is associated with traditional brick-and-mortar stores, "Cyber Monday" symbolizes a busy day for online retailers. The premise was that consumers would return to their offices after the Black Friday weekend, making purchases online that they were not able to make in stores. Although that idea has not survived the test of time, Cyber Monday has evolved into a significant marketing event, sponsored by the National Retail Federation's Shop.org division, in which online retailers offer low prices and promotions.
 

baryon

macrumors 68040
Oct 3, 2009
3,490
1,387
"Black Friday" is the Friday after Thanksgiving (US). It it called so because it's 1st 'official' shopping day for the Christmas season. In financial terms, "red" means a negative value, where "black" is considered revenue - such is the case where retailers both gauge sales on that day and turn a profit.

From the Wiki : ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Friday_(shopping) )


And there is Cyber Monday : ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyber_Monday )
Thanks for the info :D
 

macshill

macrumors 6502
Aug 22, 2008
469
0
London, Ontario, Canada
"Black Friday" is the Friday after Thanksgiving (US). It it called so because it's 1st 'official' shopping day for the Christmas season. In financial terms, "red" means a negative value, where "black" is considered revenue - such is the case where retailers both gauge sales on that day and turn a profit.

From the Wiki : ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Friday_(shopping) )


And there is Cyber Monday : ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyber_Monday )
Now try explaining to non-Canadians and non-British what Boxing Day is. ;):p:D
 
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