Campaigners Rally to Support Apple's Stance on Government Backdoors

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by MacRumors, Feb 18, 2016.

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  1. MacRumors macrumors bot

    MacRumors

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    An internet rights advocacy group has held a rally outside a San Francisco Apple Store to support Apple's fight against government backdoors in its software.

    The small group of supporters stood outside Apple's downtown retail store on Wednesday and held iPhones that bore stickers reading, "I do not consent to the search of this device," reports The Guardian.

    The protest was organized by digital rights group Fight for the Future (FFTF) to protest the U.S. government's demand that Apple aids the FBI in hacking into an iPhone recovered from one of the attackers in the San Bernardino shooting that killed 14 people.

    Apple CEO Tim Cook quickly responded to the federal court order in a letter published on the company's website, stating that the demand demonstrated "government overreach" and set "a dangerous precedent."

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    Protestors line up outside Apple Store in support of privacy rights (Image: FFTF)

    FFTF campaign manager Charlie Furman said he organized the event to bring the privacy community's appreciation of Apple off the internet and into the real world. "It's really important that we hold companies accountable when they're doing something wrong, but stand in support of them when they're doing something right," he said.

    Cindy Cohen, executive director of digital liberties group The Electronic Frontier Foundation, was also in attendance. "We want to show Apple that people are standing with them," she said. "Once Apple does it, other people are going to come and say, 'Apple, do it for me.' How do they say no the next time?"

    FFTF is planning national rallies to take place on Tuesday. The show of support follows comments from several tech company leaders backing Apple's stance on the issue, with members of the media and government officials both for and against Apple also weighing in.

    Under Tim Cook's reign, Apple has staunchly defended privacy rights and has urged the U.S. government to make a stand and support "no backdoors" in encryption, stating that creating a backdoor for law enforcement also creates a backdoor for "bad guys."

    Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

    Article Link: Campaigners Rally to Support Apple's Stance on Government Backdoors
     
  2. prowlmedia, Feb 18, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2016

    prowlmedia macrumors 68000

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    What is the point of this court order - Unlocking the door will help no one. The second this becomes a thing then criminals will use something else and we are all left with unsecured phones.

    The irony is there is probably NOTHING of any use on the phone. Given they had planned this it's entirely possible they were wiped clean before hand - Any other phones would have been burn phones and anything useful is well out of date. This probably has angry birds and a stack of angry porn.

    They were probably better off Claiming the phone was unlocked and they are pursuing the leads... and seeing what crawls out of the woodwork.

    Anyway isn't cracking the uncrackable what the NSA are for?

    And yet again the entire heinous incident wouldn't have happened if you couldn't buy SEMI-AUTOMATIC Friclkin' guns ( or any gun for that matter ) over the counter like they are Meat Sub Sandwiches. The whole 'right to bear arms' is based on a piece of paper from over 200 years ago when they were talking about pitchforks and sabres and guns took a minute to reload.
     
  3. satcomer, Feb 18, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2016

    satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

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    I'm a Conservative Libertarian and I support Apple's stance in this.
     
  4. Rogifan macrumors P6

    Rogifan

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    So what is the end result here? It's a court order so I'm assuming Apple can't just ignore it. Is Apple able to appeal it all the way to the Supreme Court? Even if Apple is right on the substance this shouldn't be their decision to make. It should be either congress or the Supreme Court that decides for all companies.
     
  5. kemal macrumors 6502a

    kemal

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    I fear all of this will lead to the government dictating the security design of our products.
    ++un good.
     
  6. leo.andres.21 macrumors regular

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    You didn't really read the essay Tim Cook wrote. They did comply with the court order

    What they didn't want to do was to build a backdoor into iOS as asked by the FBI, so the FBI could use that version of iOS to break into an iPhone if that iPhone helps any investigations.

    I'm not American, so I won't say what that has to do with my rights. But from the way the NSA was executed, is Apple wrong to oppose the FBI in this matter? I wouldn't say so.
     
  7. Four oF NINE macrumors 68000

    Four oF NINE

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    I'm a political communist and support Apple's stance on this issue.
     
  8. nope7308 macrumors 65816

    nope7308

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    This is noble and all, but don't these people have jobs?!
     
  9. 8692574 Suspended

    8692574

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    Seems the right moment for one of those "useful" petition :D
     
  10. JosephAW macrumors 65816

    JosephAW

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    Why is the FBI having such difficulties? Call Samsung and ask for a memory chip reader and dump it on to a supercomputer and decrypt it, or copy the memory, try password attempts, copy back on to device and try again, or call Samsung and find the pin out for "write to memory" and cut it, now phone is read only and they can go at it, OS X boots RO. Opening the phone doesn't erase the memory.
    But really. The password is probably something stupid like "77 virgins" or "password" or 123456.

    If the govmnt forces Apple to start storing keys on their servers as they did with iOS 7 and earlier so they can issue warrants again how many users will be willing to update to iOS 10? Or worse will the govmnt force all users update to iOS 10 whether they want to or not? I'm still on iOS 8.4.1 because I CAN'T update without buying a new computer!
    Also. I thought prisim recorded all phone numbers and conversations and they can intercept the Internet traffic? Are they admitting their systems failed and just smoke and mirrors?
     
  11. Dagless macrumors Core

    Dagless

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    Hah, that was my very first thought too.
     
  12. thasan macrumors 6502a

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    americans love lawsuits. can someone organise a one of those fancy class action lawsuits against FBI? :D
     
  13. Rogifan macrumors P6

    Rogifan

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    No they did not. Read the court order below.

    http://www.politico.com/f/?id=00000152-ecf7-d79c-a57b-fef7defc0001

    In order to comply Apple would have to create special signed FW that prevented the auto-erase functionality so the FBI could keep entering passcodes until they unlocked the device. If Apple determines this request is too burdensome it has 5 days to make an application to the court for relief (whatever that means). I'm assuming then Apple will refuse to comply for as long as legally possible. My argument is, considering this is a court order, Apple shouldn't be allowed to ignore it. Appeal all the way to the Supreme Court if necessary but companies shouldn't get to determine what court orders they follow and which ones they don't. Ultimately the Supreme Court and/or Congress will have to decide.
     
  14. carrrrrlos macrumors 6502a

    carrrrrlos

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    This all started after the FBI went to go see Furious 7.
     
  15. RedOrchestra Suspended

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  16. Jsameds macrumors 68030

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    If the government get their way the only thing that will happen is that the 'terrorists' will use other methods of secure communication and we get left with an insecure OS, with a backdoor key that will inevitably fall into the wrong hands either via a leak or by an election of an untrustworthy future government.

    Everyone should quite rightly oppose this movement with every ounce of strength they can. Good on Apple, Google and these campaigners.
     
  17. John Mcgregor Suspended

    John Mcgregor

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    #17
    Since you have some trouble reading.
     
  18. Rogifan macrumors P6

    Rogifan

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    No I don't have trouble reading. Apple doesn't get to decide what's a valid subpoena or search warrant. If Apple complied with everything being asked for there would be no reason for Cook to write that letter and this wouldn't be all over the news.
     
  19. mw360 macrumors 65816

    mw360

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    Law enforcement vs individual liberty has always been a tricky compromise. I don't support anyone at the extremes, and both sides have naive argments.

    Choose your liberties wisely. That one about bearing arms isn't working out so well and now it can never be withdrawn.
     
  20. John Mcgregor Suspended

    John Mcgregor

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    At this point i'm concerned about your sanity. As a citizen you have every right to question the validity and legality of the matter at hand. That's why you have constitution and in this case it is even more important since this is going to set a precedent either way.

    This is not a speeding case where it's clear you either exceeded the speed limit or you didn't.

    Guess what, it's not for NSA or FBI to decide either. It's for people to decide.

    Grow some balls for petes sake.
     
  21. AbSoluTc macrumors 68040

    AbSoluTc

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    Seems a lot look like students or what not. This was organized so I am sure anyone that has a job asked for some time off/personal day (most normal jobs have this). I support them and I hope more people come out. If there was something like this in my area, I would sign up and go out to show my support. I am in VA if anyone is interested.
     
  22. RedOrchestra Suspended

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    Then let's run it all the way to the Supreme Court.
     
  23. John Mcgregor Suspended

    John Mcgregor

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    #23
    Hundreds of millions use iPhones around the world this is not even something USA alone can decide. If Apple is forced to do this NSA will have a field day all around the world in no time. This can not happen.
     
  24. bbeagle macrumors 68040

    bbeagle

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    #24
    Some people think causes are more important than their jobs and they take vacation or flex time to do these types of things. My job is very flexible - if I need to attend something during daylight hours for an entire week, I would have no problem doing it. I would do my job at home in the evening, and make up time on the weekend, or the following week or so.

    Most of these people are probably in the tech field, or students, so this option is open to them all.

    You don't think out of the box, do you?
     
  25. Rogifan macrumors P6

    Rogifan

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    We live in a republic not a democracy. It's not up to people or corporations to decide either. That's why we have elected representatives, a President and a Supreme Court. Companies and individuals can't just decide on their own what court orders they choose to follow or not.

    Since when do other countries have to follow US law? Btw, I'm not arguing in favor of the court order. My argument is that it's not up to Apple to decide whether to comply with it or not. Fight it, take it all the way to the Supreme Court but it's not Apple's decision to make. Either Congress or the Supreme Court will hack to decide.
     
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