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macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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17,417



federighi_hero20120727-250x286.png
Apple VP Craig Federighi has published an op-ed in The Washington Post in which he criticizes the idea of a government backdoor into the company's software and accuses the FBI of wanting to "turn back the clock to a less-secure time".

In the op-ed, published yesterday, Apple's Senior Vice President of Software Engineering writes that Apple must "work tirelessly" to stay one step ahead of criminal attackers who "seek to pry into personal information and even co-opt devices to commit broader assaults that endanger us all".

Federighi notes that in just the past 18 months, hackers have stolen millions of people's credit card information, social security numbers and fingerprint records from retail chains, banks and even the federal government. However, Federighi calls these digital defense breaches "the tip of the iceberg".
Your phone is more than a personal device. In today's mobile, networked world, it's part of the security perimeter that protects your family and co-workers. Our nation's vital infrastructure -- such as power grids and transportation hubs -- becomes more vulnerable when individual devices get hacked. Criminals and terrorists who want to infiltrate systems and disrupt sensitive networks may start their attacks through access to just one person's smartphone.
Federighi adds that the encryption technology built into Apple's iPhones doesn't just help keep customers' information secure, but also provides "a critical line of defense against criminals who seek to implant malware or spyware and to use the device of an unsuspecting person to gain access to a business, public utility or government agency." Therefore any attempt to hamper Apple's attempts to plug points of weakness in the company's software would be "a serious mistake".
That's why it's so disappointing that the FBI, Justice Department and others in law enforcement are pressing us to turn back the clock to a less-secure time and less-secure technologies. They have suggested that the safeguards of iOS 7 were good enough and that we should simply go back to the security standards of 2013. But the security of iOS 7, while cutting-edge at the time, has since been breached by hackers. What's worse, some of their methods have been productized and are now available for sale to attackers who are less skilled but often more malicious.

To get around Apple's safeguards, the FBI wants us to create a backdoor in the form of special software that bypasses passcode protections, intentionally creating a vulnerability that would let the government force its way into an iPhone. Once created, this software -- which law enforcement has conceded it wants to apply to many iPhones -- would become a weakness that hackers and criminals could use to wreak havoc on the privacy and personal safety of us all.
Last month, FBI director James Comey penned an editorial in which he rejected Apple CEO Tim Cook's assertion that the agency was trying to set a precedent in its attempts to compel the company to create a backdoor into its software, calling the particular legal issue "actually quite narrow".

However, in a U.S. congressional hearing just last week, Comey admitted under oath that the outcome of the dispute would likely "guide how other courts handle similar requests". Additionally, in the same hearing, New York District Attorney Cyrus Vance said New York now has more than a hundred devices it would like to see unlocked, further confirming Apple's point that the argument isn't about just one iPhone.

Apple has officially opposed an order that would require it to help the FBI break into the iPhone used by San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook and will now face off against the government in court on March 22.

Dozens of technology companies, industry trade groups, and encryption experts have submitted documents to support Apple, all catalogued on Apple's website. Five families of San Bernardino victims have filed in support of the FBI.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

Article Link: Craig Federighi: FBI Wants to 'Turn Back Clock to Less-Secure Time'
 

8692574

Suspended
Mar 18, 2006
1,244
1,923
If I could turn back time
If I could find a way I'd take back those words that hurt you and you'd stay

I don't know why I did the things I did I don't know why I said the things I said
Pride's like a knife it can cut deep inside
Words are like weapons they wound sometimes.

I didn't really mean to hurt you I didn't wanna see you go I know I made you cry, but baby

[Chorus:]
If I could turn back time
If I could find a way
I'd take back those words that hurt you
And you'd stay
If I could reach the stars
I'd give them all to you
Then you'd love me, love me
Like you used to do

If I could turn back time

My world was shattered I was torn apart
Like someone took a knife and drove it deep in my heart
You walked out that door I swore that I didn't care
But I lost everything darling then and there

Too strong to tell you I was sorry
Too proud to tell you I was wrong
I know that I was blind, and ooh...

[Chorus]

Ooohh

If I could turn back time
If I could turn back time
If I could turn back time
ooh baby

I didn't really mean to hurt you
I didn't want to see you go
I know I made you cry
Ooohh

[Chorus #2]
If I could turn back time
If I could find a way
I'd take back those words that hurt you
If I could reach the stars
I'd give them all to you
Then you'd love me, love me
Like you used to do

If I could turn back time (turn back time)
If I could find a way (find a way)
Then baby, maybe, maybe
You'd stay

[to fade]
Reach the stars
If I could reach the stars.

By Cher from FBI to Apple
 

iapplelove

Suspended
Nov 22, 2011
5,324
7,632
East Coast USA
Time travel is very possible. I know it's hard for people to grasp the concept because here in the 3rd dimension it just feels impossible.

Unfortunately our black budget secret space program travels in time constantly using anti gravity propulsion systems along with worm holes, star gates and our galaxies natural portals.

In space the past, present and future are all one, as space and time are the same. It's unfortunate our school systems BS us on the real truths about space and time.

Edit: forgot to mention still very proud apple is sticking to its principals. I don't feel any other tech company would have done the same faced with the same decision.
 
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-BigMac-

macrumors 68020
Apr 15, 2011
2,007
1,861
Melbourne, Australia
Time travel is very possible. I know it's hard for people to grasp the concept because here in the 3rd dimension it just feels impossible.

Unfortunately our black budget secret space program travels in time constantly using anti gravity propulsion systems along with worm holes, star gates and our galaxies natural portals.

In space the past present and future are all one, as space and time is the same. It's unfortunate our school systems BS us on the real truths about space and time.

R U AN ALIENS :O
 

FieldingMellish

Suspended
Jun 20, 2010
2,440
3,108
Yes, even Tim released a recent photo that appeared to have been taken while experiencing indegestion, resulting in a more serious demeanor.
 
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decafjava

macrumors 601
Feb 7, 2011
4,034
4,141
Geneva
Time travel is very possible. I know it's hard for people to grasp the concept because here in the 3rd dimension it just feels impossible.

Unfortunately our black budget secret space program travels in time constantly using anti gravity propulsion systems along with worm holes, star gates and our galaxies natural portals.

In space the past, present and future are all one, as space and time are the same. It's unfortunate our school systems BS us on the real truths about space and time.

Edit: forgot to mention still very proud apple is sticking to its principals. I don't feel any other tech company would have done the same faced with the same decision.

Well a post of yours I can agree with. Bet Google and especially Facebook are supporting Apple with red faces now. I can't help thinking Apple is being punished for being among the last to join PRISM.

As to the time travel, well we do travel all of us into the future, I do think we have a poor perception of time the same way some primitive who has never flown would not know the true nature of the shape of the earth or the cosmos. No comment on the rest as it's wildly off topic.
 

pika2000

Suspended
Jun 22, 2007
5,587
4,900
All we have to do is look at the Snowden incident to see how the Government handles privacy and security.
And majority of US politicians (even the democrats) consider Snowden as a traitor.

It will be interesting. A so called liberal and progressive thinking company such as Apple will be going against all democrats and republicans. Who will the hipsters support? :D
 

photographypro

macrumors regular
Jul 7, 2010
214
72
American in Pisa (Italy)
It's a damn lie when the FBI says this is only about one iPhone. What amazes me is no one is discussing the fact that the terrorists destroyed two personal cell phones to the point where the FBI is unable to get any information off those phones. They also removed a hard drive from their computer which to date has not been found.

I'm sure the terrorists didn't say "we won't destroy this iPhone because we trust Apple and Tim Cook to protect the data on it." If there was anything of value on this iPhone it would've been destroyed!
 

shaunp

Cancelled
Nov 5, 2010
1,811
1,395
This is worrying because if Apple is forced to give in to one government it's forced to give in to them all. However this could all be a decoy and they have really unlocked it and we really have no privacy. Just a thought.
 
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Tech198

macrumors P6
Mar 21, 2011
15,916
2,148
Australia, Perth
oh man, i seriously got that song stuck in my head now :p thanks allot.

So Apple gone a wacky with security, that's ok

Mental note: iOS is a "personal device" but only after iOS 8 when hardware security was introduced because it became standard with Apple only then. Before that, it was just a regular smart phone like everyone else's, so its only logical that this happens NOW.

I would have like to see Frederighi to say this back then ? he can't.

Not that privacy and security aren't important, but if u never take into account the "change" i reckon that in itself an important issue which would decide the case.
 
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iOSFangirl6001

macrumors 6502
Aug 11, 2015
446
243
Well it's about time the judge and FBI see/admit this is about more than 1 phone and this this could set a precedence.


**sits on edge of seat eating popcorn waiting for next development and rooting for Apple**
 
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diipii

macrumors 6502a
Dec 6, 2012
618
552
UK



federighi_hero20120727-250x286.png
Apple VP Craig Federighi has published an op-ed in The Washington Post in which he criticizes the idea of a government backdoor into the company's software and accuses the FBI of wanting to "turn back the clock to a less-secure time".

In the op-ed, published yesterday, Apple's Senior Vice President of Software Engineering writes that Apple must "work tirelessly" to stay one step ahead of criminal attackers who "seek to pry into personal information and even co-opt devices to commit broader assaults that endanger us all".

Federighi notes that in just the past 18 months, hackers have stolen millions of people's credit card information, social security numbers and fingerprint records from retail chains, banks and even the federal government. However, Federighi calls these digital defense breaches "the tip of the iceberg".
Federighi adds that the encryption technology built into Apple's iPhones doesn't just help keep customers' information secure, but also provides "a critical line of defense against criminals who seek to implant malware or spyware and to use the device of an unsuspecting person to gain access to a business, public utility or government agency." Therefore any attempt to hamper Apple's attempts to plug points of weakness in the company's software would be "a serious mistake".Last month, FBI director James Comey penned an editorial in which he rejected Apple CEO Tim Cook's assertion that the agency was trying to set a precedent in its attempts to compel the company to create a backdoor into its software, calling the particular legal issue "actually quite narrow".

However, in a U.S. congressional hearing just last week, Comey admitted under oath that the outcome of the dispute would likely "guide how other courts handle similar requests". Additionally, in the same hearing, New York District Attorney Cyrus Vance said New York now has more than a hundred devices it would like to see unlocked, further confirming Apple's point that the argument isn't about just one iPhone.

Apple has officially opposed an order that would require it to help the FBI break into the iPhone used by San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook and will now face off against the government in court on March 22.

Dozens of technology companies, industry trade groups, and encryption experts have submitted documents to support Apple, all catalogued on Apple's website. Five families of San Bernardino victims have filed in support of the FBI.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

Article Link: Apple VP: FBI Wants to 'Turn Back Clock to Less-Secure Time'

The FBI is perfectly entitled to take reasonable steps to ensure your safety and security and I demand the FBI has access to anybody's phone who might compromise those states. This is just plain old common sense it today's world.
Apple must stop this myopic, hysterical posturing and act in a normal adult fashion.
Federighi's comments are just those of a bought man doing what bought men do.
 
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