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Apr 12, 2001
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iPhone-Passcode-250x317.jpg
DriveSavers today announced the launch of a new consumer-facing service that's designed to unlock iOS devices for customers who have forgotten their passcodes, been locked out after too many incorrect entry attempts, or who need to access the data on the device of a deceased family member.

DriveSavers says it is using "new proprietary technology" to recover data from a passcode-locked devices, a service that has previously been limited to law enforcement agencies and unavailable to the average consumer.

It is not known what technology DriveSavers is using to access data on the device. It may be a passcode guessing feature or something related to iCloud data, with the company suggesting it is able to recover data like photos, videos, contacts, text messages, voice recordings, and notes.

The service is advertised for Android, Windows, BlackBerry, and iOS devices, so the full breadth of information DriveSavers can recover from an iPhone or an iPad is unclear.

Law enforcement agencies have long used data recovery hacks and devices to gain access to locked iPhone devices. The most well-known recovery method highlighted in recent months is the GrayKey box, which can brute force the passcode on an iOS device using some kind of proprietary jailbreaking software. The GrayKey was allegedly disabled with iOS 12, but DriveSavers may be using a similar device or unlocking method.

graykey1.jpg
GrayKey iPhone cracking box, via MalwareBytes


Government agencies also have the ability to request data from iCloud straight from Apple, but this is presumably not a method that's available to DriveSavers for consumer data recovery requests.

The Passcode Lockout Data Recovery service is for standard customers only, and DriveSavers says it will not unlock devices for law enforcement or other government agencies. Prior to unlocking a device, DriveSavers verifies ownership "during all phases of the recovery process" and requires a legal authorization form with customers required to provide specific information before data access is provided.

DriveSavers does not provide pricing for its Passcode Lockout Data Recovery Service, and suggests that those interested call the company for more information.

Update: DriveSavers has provided MacRumors with additional info on its iPhone unlocking service. The company is able to fully unlock the iPhone and return the unlocked device to the owner, and there's an option to back up the phone's data to an external device. DriveSavers is not able to provide further information on its unlocking methods.

The service is not inexpensive, priced around $3,900. DriveSavers is also using strict identification protocols, in some cases requesting documents that include death certificates, probate documents, court documents, and more. DriveSavers says that most people use the service to access the data from the device of a deceased loved one.

Article Link: DriveSavers Lets Consumers Retrieve Data From Locked iOS Devices for $3,900 [Updated]
 
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bytethese

macrumors 68030
Jun 20, 2007
2,695
104
I assume it must be expensive. I have received via email, a $200 discount certificate on top of any partner discount for this service.
 

macduke

macrumors G4
Jun 27, 2007
11,734
16,409
Central U.S.
You know they're taking money under the table from the feds. They have a lot of money.

Apple will likely seed a device to this company to "use" this service, probably running a special build of iOS that will log everything happening to it in real-time and send that information back home. Then they can get some idea of how this works and close it down in a new update. I was working with Apple a couple weeks ago on a passcode vulnerability in iOS that they said was supposed to be patched shortly but I still haven't seen the patch yet. I wonder if it is somehow related to this.
 

gavroche

macrumors 65816
Oct 25, 2007
1,407
1,474
Left Coast
Should affect the law enforcement versions. Hard to justify the insane prices they charge, if consumers can go get it done for a fraction of the price...
 
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KPandian1

macrumors 65816
Oct 22, 2013
1,493
2,427
Now that law-enforcement agencies don't want these devices, they are going after the gullible public, the ones who want to hack their spouses' or children's smartphones.
 

mrow

macrumors 6502
Aug 15, 2009
377
507
Will work until the next ios update.

Seriously. I’m assuming this is a service where you send in the device and they recover the data. Seems like the obvious thing Apple will do is send a device in with custom logging software loaded and once the device is returned, used the logged data to plug whatever software exploit is allowing this service to work.
 
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gertruded

macrumors 6502
Jul 5, 2007
304
1,053
Northwestern Illinois
Digital privacy is an illusion. We will soon have a social credit score like in China, as well as our financial credit score. Digital information is only safe if no one wants it, it is not safe because it is on an Apple device.

Welcome to our dystopian world. What is your social social score? Our social media companies have enough data to calculate one for you.
 
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jlseattle

Cancelled
Jan 9, 2007
501
356
Seattle WA
I keep the "erase iPhone" after 10 attempts feature. Do not want anyone getting my data. It's in the cloud so erasing my phone doesn't matter to me.
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Who says this even works?
I bet they make an "attempt" and then charge 200-300 for the attempt. if the phone had an easy passcode with no other security then it would be easy to break. But above and beyond that. The minute you lose your phone change your iCloud password. You can even wipe your phone remotely from iCloud if you have the track my phone featured turned on.
 

LessO2

macrumors regular
May 20, 2012
157
152
The service is not inexpensive, priced around $3,900. DriveSavers is also using strict identification protocols, in some cases requesting documents that include death certificates, probate documents, court documents, and more. DriveSavers says that most people use the service to access the data from the device of a deceased loved one.

Wouldn't spending $30 for a shovel to dig up and reach into the pocket of the deceased love one be quicker?
 
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