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European Union Ends Antitrust Investigations Into Apple's iPhone Repair and iOS Development Policies

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Over the weekend, the European Commission announced that it has dropped pair of antitrust investigations it had been conducting related to Apple's policies on international iPhone repairs and third-party development tools for iOS applications.

The first issue related to Apple's policies that made it difficult for consumers who purchased an iPhone in one European Union member country to have their device serviced under warranty in another member country.
One focused on the "country of purchase" rule, whereby repairs service is only available in the country where the iPhone was bought, which made the exercise of warranty rights difficult for consumers who had purchased an iPhone in another EU/EEA country than their home country. The Commission had concerns that this rule could amount to territorial restrictions aimed at dissuading European consumers from buying iPhones outside their country of residence and so leading to a partitioning of the market.
In response to the investigation, Apple has now rescinded its "country of purchase" rule and will allow independent service providers to offer warranty repairs to cross-border customers.

As for the second issue, it was reported last month that the European Commission had joined onto an investigation being conducted by U.S. regulators into Apple's exclusion of third-party development tools for the creation iOS applications for submission to the company's App Store. The Commission's concerns were evidently addressed by Apple's announcement earlier this month that it would begin allowing such tools to be used and would increase transparency in the application review process.



Article Link: European Union Ends Antitrust Investigations Into Apple's iPhone Repair and iOS Development Policies
 

PeterQVenkman

macrumors 68020
Mar 4, 2005
2,023
0
Good news for European people. Going between countries over there is about as common as traveling between states in the USA. Makes sense.
 
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talkingfuture

macrumors 65816
Dec 4, 2008
1,216
0
The back of beyond.
Looks like they managed to navigate a way through there, I wonder if this was the reason behind the recent app store changes. They must have known behind the scenes that this would be a likely outcome.
 
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Rodimus Prime

macrumors G4
Oct 9, 2006
10,136
4
and people think Apple did those changes for the good of it customers which I think is funny as hell. Apple did both because they knew they would be screwed if they tried to fight it. The 3rd party one because chances are if they let the governments finish their investigation chances are what they would of required would of forced Apple to become a lot more open.
 
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The Phazer

macrumors 68030
Oct 31, 2007
2,855
501
London, UK
Looks like they managed to navigate a way through there, I wonder if this was the reason behind the recent app store changes.

It's absolutely unquestionably the reason behind the changes.

Apple decided to let Flash developed apps back in precisely the hope the EU would drop this investigation, since if it had gone ahead the likely remedy would have been an enormous fine and not allowing Apple to run a single App Store on the iPhone any more. Apple chose the path that let them retain the most control.

Phazer
 
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Scooterman1

macrumors 6502a
May 15, 2008
939
12
Houston, Tx
They should have pursued this. Just because Apple made changes to cease future allegations, this did nothing for the wrong they have already done in the past, and the revenues lost because of it.
 
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iSee

macrumors 68040
Oct 25, 2004
3,526
253
Yeah, the EU "dropped" the investigations in the sense that they won Apple's unconditional surrender. Good for all of us.
 
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The Phazer

macrumors 68030
Oct 31, 2007
2,855
501
London, UK
Yeah, the EU "dropped" the investigations in the sense that they won Apple's unconditional surrender. Good for all of us.

Not really. Apple still gets to censor content based on Steve's prejudices. They still get to restrict software that goes into the App Store to try and kill off competing software like Flash. They still get to do lots of bad things.

Just less than they were trying to do.

Phazer
 
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NebulaClash

macrumors 68000
Feb 4, 2010
1,810
0
and people think Apple did those changes for the good of it customers which I think is funny as hell. Apple did both because they knew they would be screwed if they tried to fight it. The 3rd party one because chances are if they let the governments finish their investigation chances are what they would of required would of forced Apple to become a lot more open.

Apple did what they did for business reasons, in both cases. They do try to make consumers happy, and even when they create restrictions it's usually because they fear not having those restrictions will make for situations that will make consumers unhappy. No, not you, the geek that is enraged by those restrictions, but the average mom and pop consumer.

Now the EU gets involved and it becomes a business decision to change the policy, given that the alternative is worse.

In both cases Apple made a business decision. And people on these forums will continue to pretend that it was an emotional decision in both cases.
 
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NebulaClash

macrumors 68000
Feb 4, 2010
1,810
0
Not really. Apple still gets to censor content based on Steve's prejudices. They still get to restrict software that goes into the App Store to try and kill off competing software like Flash. They still get to do lots of bad things.

Yes, that's one way to describe the situation, if you resort to propaganda terms to try to influence the emotions of the reader.

Or you could say that Apple still curates the store (as most stores on earth do) based on clearly published guidelines.

But hey, that wouldn't let you rant about Steve, would it?
 
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JAT

macrumors 603
Dec 31, 2001
6,473
124
Mpls, MN
How was this even worth anyone's time, on either side? Location of repair shops?

Congrats to the Europeans, this is what you pay your pseudo-government for. You "win" again. :rolleyes:

I guess Apple (and probably most companies) just needs to recognize that the "states" of the EU exist and stop treating it like more than one place. UK won't like it, but hey, maybe y'all can start another war.
 
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Vulpinemac

macrumors 6502a
Nov 6, 2007
677
0
Apple Blinked. Good for everyone, including Apple at some point. Their previous position was simply untenable.

Your proof? If you ask me, their position was right in that it helps protect the customer from malware and scammers. Since the average consumer doesn't know (or care) how to protect himself, somebody has to do it for them. Why else are there so many anti-malware apps out there for PCs and other devices?
 
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Mattie Num Nums

macrumors 68030
Mar 5, 2009
2,834
0
USA
Your proof? If you ask me, their position was right in that it helps protect the customer from malware and scammers. Since the average consumer doesn't know (or care) how to protect himself, somebody has to do it for them. Why else are there so many anti-malware apps out there for PCs and other devices?

Same reason why tons of fart apps exist. People buy them.
 
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Winni

macrumors 68040
Oct 15, 2008
3,207
1,194
Germany.
Your proof? If you ask me, their position was right in that it helps protect the customer from malware and scammers. Since the average consumer doesn't know (or care) how to protect himself, somebody has to do it for them. Why else are there so many anti-malware apps out there for PCs and other devices?

Does the word FREEDOM mean anything to you? You know, things like freedom of choice and freedom of speech - the sort of freedom that Apple does NOT give its customers.
 
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BruiserB

macrumors 68000
Aug 9, 2008
1,608
493
So are the country of origin warranty requirements rescinded worldwide or just between EU countries? Can an American buy an Australian iPhone and get it repaired here, or does it just allow a UK customer to get his Italian purchased iPhone fixed at home?
 
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aristotle

macrumors 68000
Mar 13, 2007
1,768
5
Canada
Does the word FREEDOM mean anything to you? You know, things like freedom of choice and freedom of speech - the sort of freedom that Apple does NOT give its customers.
You have freedom to choose whatever type of phone is available on your carrier. Nobody is holding a gun to your head to get an iPhone. I want to have freedom from having to deal with malware and preinstalled crapware which is why I choose the iPhone over Android. With Android, you gain some other freedoms but lose others (depending on carrier) as many providers are insisting on installing their own branded apps on Android devices and locking down the phones to only use the services of their choice.
 
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ukmacpro

macrumors member
Oct 1, 2008
73
19
London
Does the word FREEDOM mean anything to you? You know, things like freedom of choice and freedom of speech - the sort of freedom that Apple does NOT give its customers.

Freedom of choice also gives you the option NOT to buy their product... We're not in a world where we're forced to use Apple's devices (although maybe that's the ultimate aim one day...!)
 
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aristotle

macrumors 68000
Mar 13, 2007
1,768
5
Canada
They should have pursued this. Just because Apple made changes to cease future allegations, this did nothing for the wrong they have already done in the past, and the revenues lost because of it.
I see that you changed your avatar from Android to hide your allegiance. You do realize that Android is only "OPEN" for carriers and that you have to "ROOT" the device in order to open it up for yourself?
 
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KirkL

macrumors 6502
Jul 27, 2010
410
2
United States
How was this even worth anyone's time, on either side? Location of repair shops?

Congrats to the Europeans, this is what you pay your pseudo-government for. You "win" again. :rolleyes:

I guess Apple (and probably most companies) just needs to recognize that the "states" of the EU exist and stop treating it like more than one place. UK won't like it, but hey, maybe y'all can start another war.

Good job...that was the point
 
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hitekalex

macrumors 68000
Feb 4, 2008
1,624
0
Chicago, USA
Yes, that's one way to describe the situation, if you resort to propaganda terms to try to influence the emotions of the reader.

Or you could say that Apple still curates the store (as most stores on earth do) based on clearly published guidelines.

The "curated store" notion falls flat on its face, if you combine it with a little fact that the Apple App Store still remains the only way to get applications onto your iOS devices.

It would be like the situation where you can only see art in a single museum (let's call it Museum of Classic Art).. and that museum decided they don't want to display any modern art. But you couldn't go to Museum of Modern Art, since it wouldn't be allowed to exist. That is the situation with Apple and iOS apps.

Apple can "curate" anything they want out of their App Store, but they should ALSO allow the users to side-load applications from other sources onto the devices that they own. Until that happens - Apple's model remains anti-consumer and anti-competition.. And Apple will continue to be the subject of law suits and resentment from many of their customers.
 
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KnightWRX

macrumors Pentium
Jan 28, 2009
15,046
4
Quebec, Canada
There is no question why Apple went back on their decision, and it's all to their honor. To admit they were wrong and do a 180 took some guts. They could have fought it for a few years with the EU to try and prove their point, but in the end they took the right path.

Consumer wins, developers win, which means Apple will also win.
 
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NebulaClash

macrumors 68000
Feb 4, 2010
1,810
0
The "curated store" notion falls flat on its face, if you combine it with a little fact that the Apple App Store still remains the only way to get applications onto your iOS devices.

It would be like the situation where you can only see art in a single museum (let's call it Museum of Classic Art).. and that museum decided they don't want to display any modern art. But you couldn't go to Museum of Modern Art, since it wouldn't be allowed to exist. That is the situation with Apple and iOS apps.

Apple can "curate" anything they want out of their App Store, but they should ALSO allow the users to side-load applications from other sources onto the devices that they own. Until that happens - Apple's model remains anti-consumer and anti-competition.. And Apple will continue to be the subject of law suits and resentment from many of their customers.

I disagree with your analogy. Here is my Museum of Modern Art analogy:

The Museum of Modern Art [Apple] curates its collection so that people get what they expect when they visit the museum. That is, they see good quality modern art. If you want to see other types of art, it doesn't do much good to whine about the rules. Just go to any of the other museums where you can find all kinds of art.

Apple doesn't control the market. They make a device and they curate apps for that device. Don't like it? Pick any of the other devices. Simple.
 
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NebulaClash

macrumors 68000
Feb 4, 2010
1,810
0
There is no question why Apple went back on their decision, and it's all to their honor. To admit they were wrong and do a 180 took some guts. They could have fought it for a few years with the EU to try and prove their point, but in the end they took the right path.

Consumer wins, developers win, which means Apple will also win.

I think this is a good point, and it shows one of the ways Apple is not Microsoft. Both companies make mistakes, but Microsoft is loath to admit theirs. They will fight for years.

Apple says, OK, we'll change.
 
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