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Le0M

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Aug 13, 2020
879
1,223
Hello everyone,

I've been using my MacBook Air late 2010 since then, and in a few months I'll have the opportunity to start working on shooting with DLSRs and such, and then post editing full-hd (perhaps more), so I'll definitely have to get a way more powerful Mac. I'm really tempted by the 16 inches MacBook Pro, but since Apple's announcement for its upcoming SOC Macs I'm not sure I want to upgrade before that happens, since by the look of it, they are going to be way more powerful and have increased battery life. Lastly, I might go to China next year and I wanted to know whether there are any downsides by getting one there, like it happens with iPhones where FaceTime audio is not available. So I'm here to have your two cents on this.

Thanks in advance,
Leonardo
 

nothingtoseehere

macrumors 6502
Jun 3, 2020
453
521
so I'll definitely have to get a way more powerful Mac

As your new usage is going to happen in a few months, waiting does not seem to be a valid option?
Many people here, including me, say, if you need a machine, get a machine.
You could use the remaining time to look for a refurbished 16" model, saving some money and maybe not keeping it for 10 years again (depending on how things are going with Apple Silicon).

Concerning China, I am not of any help. Sorry ?
 

Le0M

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Aug 13, 2020
879
1,223
As your new usage is going to happen in a few months, waiting does not seem to be a valid option?
Many people here, including me, say, if you need a machine, get a machine.
You could use the remaining time to look for a refurbished 16" model, saving some money and maybe not keeping it for 10 years again (depending on how things are going with Apple Silicon).

Concerning China, I am not of any help. Sorry ?

Well, my logic tells me that if I got by with a "cheap" MacBook Air for 10 bloody years, than if I get a super-cool MacBook Pro in 10 years time it'll still be a great machine. I also think that we'll stick to 4K resolution for longer than people think, also because for desktop and laptop computers' screen a higher resolution wouldn't be seen by the naked eye anyway. The only field that would benefit from, say, 8K, is TV screens. So, again, I'm pretty sure that in 10 years we'll still see mostly 2-4K resolutions, that I'll still be able to easily edit with my MacBook Pro.
 

HDFan

Contributor
Jun 30, 2007
6,782
2,976
So, again, I'm pretty sure that in 10 years we'll still see mostly 2-4K resolutions, that I'll still be able to easily edit with my MacBook Pro.

8K isn't just more pixels, there are a number of other benefits. HD sales are already less than 50% of the market. HD will Likely be gone in 10 years.


There have been a number of reports of editing issues with Canon R5 and R6 files, where exports of even small clips can take hours. Editing of some 4K footage on the most powerful Mac available, the new MacPro, can be difficult. Some problems will be fixed via software updates, some may require hardware changes.


A system you purchase now will likely have problems editing video formats in use 10 years from now. I would look for a system that meets your current needs, at minimal cost. That way when newer systems are introduced with hardware that better supports video editing you can replace it as needed.
 
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hobowankenobi

macrumors 68020
Aug 27, 2015
2,078
884
on the land line mr. smith.
With the rate of change in the last few years, I doubt anybody can say what to expect in 10 years. True, a plateau could be reached and advances slow...but that seems less likely.

I would suggest aiming for a machine that will handle the next 3-5 years...anything after that is gravy.

The switch to Apple silicon will likely limit the life of every X86 Mac a bit, at least to run newer OSes and current software. In the switch from PPC to X86, some Macs were viable (could get updates and run current software) for less than 5 years. At the very least...value/resale will plummet within a few years.

If it were me, I would either:
  1. Find a good deal on a low mileage Mac, 1-2 years old (or an Apple refurb older model) to get through 3+ years
  2. Wait at least until this winter to see what new hardware pops
Either way, all of us with X86 Macs will have to decide, like a used car: Do I drive it until it drops, or do I sell it while it still has good resale value? Doing that....means paying attention to both the new and used markets.
 
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nothingtoseehere

macrumors 6502
Jun 3, 2020
453
521
With the rate of change in the last few years, I doubt anybody can say what to expect in 10 years. True, a plateau could be reached and advances slow...but that seems less likely.

I would say we rather have had a plateau in the 2010s due to stagnating processor development of Intel. In former times, you got the impression that your new computer is already dated the day after purchase! For me, it still feels highly unfamiliar that I can use my early 2015 device without issues. Or that OP can still work with his 2010 MBA.

As of today, there seems to be some movement. Apple Silicon, the rise of AMD... And also Intel may leap forward again. Not to mention GPU development.

Therefore, I would not bet that a new computer will keep up for 10 years in the 2020s, especially not when performance matters.
 

hobowankenobi

macrumors 68020
Aug 27, 2015
2,078
884
on the land line mr. smith.
I would say we rather have had a plateau in the 2010s due to stagnating processor development of Intel. In former times, you got the impression that your new computer is already dated the day after purchase! For me, it still feels highly unfamiliar that I can use my early 2015 device without issues. Or that OP can still work with his 2010 MBA.

As of today, there seems to be some movement. Apple Silicon, the rise of AMD... And also Intel may leap forward again. Not to mention GPU development.

Therefore, I would not bet that a new computer will keep up for 10 years in the 2020s, especially not when performance matters.


Agreed.

But I was actually suggesting that the workflows of high res photography and video would continue their march to higher res and larger files, requiring evermore horsepower to edit and manage...and that will likely demand newer/faster hardware.

My 2 cents is that software developers (having worked around some) will always leverage hardware to enable new features...so the arms race will never end: no matter how fast hardware gets, software will always be ready for more. And yes, we may be entering a new period of hardware change and growth...faster/bigger than typical change.
 
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