Hands-On With macOS Catalina

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Apr 12, 2001
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Apple this week unveiled macOS Catalina, the newest version of the macOS software designed to run on Macs. macOS Catalina is launching this fall, but it is available now in a beta capacity for developers.

In our latest video, we went hands-on with macOS Catalina to explore all of the new features that are coming to the Mac later this year.


One of the most notable changes in Catalina is the elimination of the iTunes app, which has been a key Mac feature since 2001. In Catalina, iTunes has been replaced by three apps: Music, Podcasts, and TV (coming later in the year).

The new apps can do everything that iTunes can do, so Mac users aren't going to be losing any functionality. As for device management, that's now done using the Finder app. When you plug in an iPhone or an iPad, it'll show right up in Finder, with all of the same management and syncing features available.

The TV, Podcasts, and Music apps look similar to iTunes and have similar features, which should make the transition easy for most Mac users. On Macs with a 4K display, such as the iMac, the new TV app will support 4K HDR playback for the first time, along with Dolby Atmos sound.

macOS Catalina has a useful new Sidecar feature, designed to turn the iPad into a secondary display for the Mac. It can work as a traditional second display or with a mirroring feature. Apple Pencil support works with Sidecar, so you can turn your iPad into a drawing tablet using apps like Photoshop.

For those with an Apple Watch set up to unlock the Mac, there's now an option to approve security prompts in Catalina by tapping on the side button of the watch. Macs with a T2 chip in them also support Activation Lock, making them useless to thieves much as it does on the iPhone.

There's a new Find My app that lets you track your lost devices, and previously, this functionality was only available via iCloud on the Mac. There's even a new option to find your devices even when they're offline by leveraging Bluetooth connections to other nearby devices, something that's particularly handy on the Mac because it doesn't have a cellular connection.

Apple is expanding Screen Time to the Mac in Catalina, letting Apple users track their device usage across Mac, iOS, and iPad for a better overall picture of time spent using electronics.

For developers, a "Project Catalyst" feature lets apps designed for the iPad be ported over to the Mac with just a few clicks in Xcode and some minor tweaks. Apple's ultimate goal with Project Catalyst is to bring more apps to the Mac.

Photos has an updated interface that better highlights your best pictures, Safari includes a new start page with Siri Suggestions, Mail has a new feature for blocking emails and another new option for muting threads, and the Reminders app has been overhauled and is now more useful.

Notably, macOS Catalina does away with 32-bit app support, so some of your older apps are going to stop working. The operating system will let you know which apps are now defunct once you upgrade.

macOS Catalina is available to developers, but it shouldn't be installed on a main machine and this time because it's not particularly stable and has quite a few bugs. Apple plans to make a Catalina beta available for public beta testers in July, and following a few months of testing to iron out bugs and refine features, macOS Catalina will launch in the fall.

Article Link: Hands-On With macOS Catalina
 

TonyRS

macrumors member
Mar 1, 2017
40
90
The relative lack of new features makes me hopeful that the .0 release of this will be as solid as 10.14 was. That is, I expect Catalina to just be refinement of Mojave. Maybe we will even see some performance improvements over earlier OS's.
 

Joshsand

macrumors newbie
Apr 29, 2010
24
1
new Zealand



Apple this week unveiled macOS Catalina, the newest version of the macOS software designed to run on Macs. macOS Catalina is launching this fall, but it is available now in a beta capacity for developers.

In our latest video, we went hands-on with macOS Catalina to explore all of the new features that are coming to the Mac later this year.


One of the most notable changes in Catalina is the elimination of the iTunes app, which has been a key Mac feature since 2001. In Catalina, iTunes has been replaced by three apps: Music, Podcasts, and TV (coming later in the year).

The new apps can do everything that iTunes can do, so Mac users aren't going to be losing any functionality. As for device management, that's now done using the Finder app. When you plug in an iPhone or an iPad, it'll show right up in Finder, with all of the same management and syncing features available.

The TV, Podcasts, and Music apps look similar to iTunes and have similar features, which should make the transition easy for most Mac users. On Macs with a 4K display, such as the iMac, the new TV app will support 4K HDR playback for the first time, along with Dolby Atmos sound.

macOS Catalina has a useful new Sidecar feature, designed to turn the iPad into a secondary display for the Mac. It can work as a traditional second display or with a mirroring feature. Apple Pencil support works with Sidecar, so you can turn your iPad into a drawing tablet using apps like Photoshop.

For those with an Apple Watch set up to unlock the Mac, there's now an option to approve security prompts in Catalina by tapping on the side button of the watch. Macs with a T2 chip in them also support Activation Lock, making them useless to thieves much as it does on the iPhone.

There's a new Find My app that lets you track your lost devices, and previously, this functionality was only available via iCloud on the Mac. There's even a new option to find your devices even when they're offline by leveraging Bluetooth connections to other nearby devices, something that's particularly handy on the Mac because it doesn't have a cellular connection.

Apple is expanding Screen Time to the Mac in Catalina, letting Apple users track their device usage across Mac, iOS, and iPad for a better overall picture of time spent using electronics.

For developers, a "Project Catalyst" feature lets apps designed for the iPad be ported over to the Mac with just a few clicks in Xcode and some minor tweaks. Apple's ultimate goal with Project Catalyst is to bring more apps to the Mac.

Photos has an updated interface that better highlights your best pictures, Safari includes a new start page with Siri Suggestions, Mail has a new feature for blocking emails and another new option for muting threads, and the Reminders app has been overhauled and is now more useful.

Notably, macOS Catalina does away with 32-bit app support, so some of your older apps are going to stop working. The operating system will let you know which apps are now defunct once you upgrade.

macOS Catalina is available to developers, but it shouldn't be installed on a main machine and this time because it's not particularly stable and has quite a few bugs. Apple plans to make a Catalina beta available for public beta testers in July, and following a few months of testing to iron out bugs and refine features, macOS Catalina will launch in the fall.

Article Link: Hands-On With macOS Catalina
[doublepost=1559778889][/doublepost]I hope the 'Finder' device system will still function with all the older devices like they do in iTunes.
I still have a working iPod shuffle 1GB from 2006 that still works and I use.
 
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Yvan256

macrumors 603
Jul 5, 2004
5,032
886
Canada
The question is, how do we manage regular playlists on something like the 4th generation iPod shuffle via Finder?
How about smart playlists on iPhones?
 
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MauiPa

macrumors 6502a
Apr 18, 2018
568
762
At least the default wallpaper won't be a damn desert anymore will it?
Catalina Island is not a tropical jungle
[doublepost=1559781981][/doublepost]
In other words, 70% of all games will not run anymore...

Maybe that’s why they launch Apple Arcade just around the same time as Catalina?
Why wouldn't the game vendors recompile? It's pretty easy. What other stuff have they not kept pace with?
 
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autrefois

macrumors 65816
Oct 22, 2003
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The operating system will let you know which apps are now defunct once you upgrade.
What would be helpful, for non-techies who don’t know the difference between 32- and 64-bit, is if the installer warned you *before* you install Catalina which apps will no longer work, so that you could decide if you want to go through with the upgrade or not (or if there is some app you can’t/don’t want to do without).
 

MauiPa

macrumors 6502a
Apr 18, 2018
568
762
Will my classic 2012 mbp live another year? Didn’t really read the specifics.
Use the google, Luke!

MacOS Catalina 10.15 is compatible with the following Macs:

  • MacBook Pro (mid 2012 and newer)
  • MacBook Air (mid 2012 and newer)
  • MacBook (early 2015 and later)
  • iMac (late 2012 or newer)
  • iMac Pro (2017 or newer)
  • Mac Pro (late 2013 or newer)
  • Mac Mini (late 2012 or newer)
http://osxdaily.com/2019/06/04/macos-catalina-compatibile-macs-list/

BTW: it would still live even if it couldn't accept the latest OS,
 

tothemoonsands

macrumors regular
Jun 14, 2018
117
208
Can someone test & answer the following? Will previously downloaded iTunes content (i.e movies, music, and TV shoes) be automatically transferred over into these apps?

I have slow rural internet and it took months to download my iTunes library of 350+ movies. The thought of having to re-download is a nightmare.
 

tallscot

macrumors regular
Mar 30, 2002
247
436
Nothing there for me to go through the hassle and risk of updating. My prediction is this OS X has the slowest adoption rate of any OS X.
 
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techfreak23

macrumors regular
Sep 8, 2013
168
201
“Notably, macOS Catalina does away with 32-bit app support, so some of your older apps are going to stop working. The operating system will let you know which apps are now defunct once you upgrade.”
Why can’t they tell you BEFORE you do the upgrade...? Time Machine does the same thing with backups it deletes. It tells you AFTER it deletes them...
 

tallscot

macrumors regular
Mar 30, 2002
247
436
“Notably, macOS Catalina does away with 32-bit app support, so some of your older apps are going to stop working. The operating system will let you know which apps are now defunct once you upgrade.”
Why can’t they tell you BEFORE you do the upgrade...? Time Machine does the same thing with backups it deletes. It tells you AFTER it deletes them...
They have been telling you that if you have Mojave. Every time you launch a 32-bit app in Mojave, it tells you that support will end soon.

The real question is this – WHY END 32-BIT SUPPORT??

What, exactly, do I gain by going through the hassle of upgrading to a new OS that throws away 32-bit apps? The ability to make an iPad a second monitor? The ability to run phone apps on my $6,000 Mac Pro????

**** me.
 

Glockworkorange

macrumors 68020
Feb 10, 2015
2,176
3,483
Chicago, Illinois
Can someone test & answer the following? Will previously downloaded iTunes content (i.e movies, music, and TV shoes) be automatically transferred over into these apps?

I have slow rural internet and it took months to download my iTunes library of 350+ movies. The thought of having to re-download is a nightmare.
If it’s already downloaded, I imagine it will be shifted around as opposed to needing to be re-downloaded.

I understand your concern, however, I wouldn’t worry too much.
 

mollyc

macrumors 68020
Aug 18, 2016
2,210
10,117
“Notably, macOS Catalina does away with 32-bit app support, so some of your older apps are going to stop working. The operating system will let you know which apps are now defunct once you upgrade.”
Why can’t they tell you BEFORE you do the upgrade...? Time Machine does the same thing with backups it deletes. It tells you AFTER it deletes them...
Mojave already does this.
 

Glockworkorange

macrumors 68020
Feb 10, 2015
2,176
3,483
Chicago, Illinois

saba01

macrumors member
Jul 9, 2011
96
32
What would be helpful, for non-techies who don’t know the difference between 32- and 64-bit, is if the installer warned you *before* you install Catalina which apps will no longer work, so that you could decide if you want to go through with the upgrade or not (or if there is some app you can’t/don’t want to do without).
You do not need this. Just click on the Apple symbol in the upper left of the screen then About This Mac / System Report / Software / Applications
There all Apps are listed and you can sort for 64-Bit all others are 32-Bit and will not work after update...