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Earlier this month, Apple released a 14.3 software update for the HomePod and HomePod mini, and it has since been discovered that this update allows the HomePod mini to be powered by select 18W chargers.

homepod-mini.jpg

As noted in a Reddit thread spotted by The 8-Bit, and confirmed by MacRumors, the HomePod mini now works with Apple's own 18W USB-C power adapter and select third-party 18W power adapters from brands like Aukey. One user was even able to power the HomePod mini with an 18W battery pack from Cygnett, allowing for portable use.

Previously, when attempting to use the HomePod mini with a power adapter rated below 20W, the speaker would simply display an orange light and not function. This may still be the case with certain 18W power adapters, as certain power profiles may be required.

Apple includes a 20W power adapter with the HomePod mini, but many customers may have an 18W power adapter from an iPhone 11 Pro or other device.

To check if your HomePod mini is running the 14.3 software update, open the Home app on an iPhone, tap on the house icon in the top-left corner, tap on Home Settings, and tap on Software Update. ‌‌‌‌HomePod‌‌‌‌‌ software updates are installed automatically, unless the feature is disabled‌‌‌‌, but updates can also be installed manually.

Article Link: HomePod Mini Now Works With Select 18W Chargers Following 14.3 Software Update
 

MacDevil7334

Contributor
Oct 15, 2011
2,531
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Austin TX
I wonder if using the 18W adapter will affect sound quality at all compared to the 20W. I’m guessing not or Apple would not have enabled the functionality in 14.3.
 

BruiserB

macrumors 68000
Aug 9, 2008
1,737
726
I inadvertently noticed something had changed, now this makes sense. I have an Aukey 36W charger that has 2 USB C ports. Prior to the software update, it would power the Homepod mini if that was the only thing plugged into it, but the Homepod would glow orange if something else was plugged in. I just recently noticed that it stopped doing this and I could plug something else in as well. My guess is with 2 things plugged in, 18W is allocated to each port, but this is now enough for the mini.

EDIT: Just looked at the Aukey manual...it says: Either USB-C port can output 30W Power Delivery on its own. When both ports are used, each USB-C port outputs up to 18W Power Delivery.
 

TVreporter

macrumors 68000
Mar 11, 2012
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Near Toronto
Can Macrumours create a thread or section for the HomePod and mini? Been wanting to get people’s reactions and uses for it.

Was hoping to get a mini for Christmas but delivery is now well into January. :(
 

MacDevil7334

Contributor
Oct 15, 2011
2,531
5,728
Austin TX
Can Macrumours create a thread or section for the HomePod and mini? Been wanting to get people’s reactions and uses for it.

Was hoping to get a mini for Christmas but delivery is now well into January. :(
If you have an Apple store nearby, keep checking stock through the app. Mine is showing pickup is available today even though delivery shows late January. I think stores are getting new stock regularly.
 
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legacyb4

macrumors 6502a
Aug 13, 2002
710
437
Vancouver, BC
Maximum volume will be 20 percent lower obviously. There should be no difference until you reach the highest possible volume.

This would be true assuming all 20W are needed to drive the speaker? Not sure how that works in real-world.

On the other hand, would swapping from the 18W to 20W be better for charging an iPad Pro?
 

burnout8488

macrumors 6502a
May 8, 2011
575
79
Endwell, NY
Maximum volume will be 20 percent lower obviously. There should be no difference until you reach the highest possible volume.
Only if the device requires 20 watts to achieve maximum volume. I guess we don't truly know yet. Someone should plug one into a watt meter with both power supplies and find out.
 

centauratlas

macrumors 68000
Jan 29, 2003
1,826
3,772
Florida
Why, for what purpose? They play music great as they are.

For the same purpose that they included it in the HomePod Mini. And so that the high end device isn't missing a feature the Mini has, as far as the A8 chip, merely because it would be 4 years newer:

From MacRumors.com (https://www.macrumors.com/guide/homepod-mini-vs-homepod/ )

U1 Chip​

The ‌HomePod mini‌ contains one feature that the original ‌HomePod‌ lacks: the U1 chip. The Apple-designed U1 chip is an ultra-wideband chip which performs directional and proximity-based operations.

The ‌HomePod mini‌ uses the U1 chip to detect when other U1 devices, such as the iPhone 12, are nearby. This allows it to more quickly hand off audio and interact with nearby devices, as well as display relevant information on devices that are close to the ‌HomePod mini‌.

Beyond this, however, the full potential of U1 in ‌HomePod mini‌ does not yet seem to have been realized. In the future, U1 could facilitate close-range data-transfer, improve AR experiences, and track a user's location within the home. Apple now seems to be adding the U1 chip to all of its new devices, with the chip appearing in the iPhone 12 lineup and the Apple Watch Series 6.
 
Last edited:

maxdefcon

macrumors member
Sep 22, 2007
67
52
Could I use this with the HomePod mini?


I guess I’m asking is there a difference between a charger and a power adapter?
 

bodonnell202

macrumors 68030
Jan 5, 2016
2,524
3,306
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Could I use this with the HomePod mini?


I guess I’m asking is there a difference between a charger and a power adapter?
Yes you could. It’s 20W just like the one Apple includes in the box (just in a more compact package).
 
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