Other How is everyone’s battery health on their current iPhone?!?

JBGoode

macrumors 6502a
Jun 16, 2018
710
999
iPhone X:
About 10 months old
About 110 charge cycles
100% capacity per iPhone battery health/102% capacity per Coconut
 

JohnnyGo

macrumors 6502a
Sep 9, 2009
673
378
iPhone X:
About 10 months old
About 110 charge cycles
100% capacity per iPhone battery health/102% capacity per Coconut
Thanks for sharing. As I stated previously, iPhone battery may hold 100% capacity for 6-12 months after initial use.
 

FeliApple

macrumors 65816
Apr 8, 2015
1,295
469
It’s actually very possible. Batteries will stay high on first 6-12 months sometimes above 100%.

When they start depleting, it will deplete faster as time goes by. 3rd year depletes faster than 2nd year all else constant (use, type of charger, frequency of charging)

Anyone that lets the battery drain to zero every other day is abusing its battery life and that will result in faster depletion

TLDR Battery depletion is not linear
This is true, but this is not true. The vast - vast - majority of people update the iOS version on their phones. Newer versions consume more battery, therefore, if the user keeps using his phone in the same way, the phone on its second iOS version will have less battery life than the first, therefore using more cycles and draining the battery faster, the phone on its third iOS version will have WAY less battery life than the second, so, assuming the user’s usage remains constant, the phone will use more cycles and battery health will drop even faster.

I have devices that weren’t updated and battery health dropped normally throughout many years. I have an iPhone 5s that’s five years old and it has 87% health. It’s on iOS 8.

Battery health is irrelevant if the phone isn’t updated, though. My family has two iPhone 6s. One on iOS 10, and the other one was recently forced to iOS 13 by Apple’s pathetic iOS 9/64-but activation bug.
The 6s on iOS 10 has 78% health and over twice the cycles than the one on iOS 13, which has 92% health.
Guess which one has FAR - FAR - better battery life? You guessed! The supposedly crippled device on iOS 10.
 

I7guy

macrumors Core
Nov 30, 2013
21,260
9,057
Gotta be in it to win it
This is true, but this is not true. The vast - vast - majority of people update the iOS version on their phones. Newer versions consume more battery, therefore, if the user keeps using his phone in the same way, the phone on its second iOS version will have less battery life than the first, therefore using more cycles and draining the battery faster, the phone on its third iOS version will have WAY less battery life than the second, so, assuming the user’s usage remains constant, the phone will use more cycles and battery health will drop even faster.

I have devices that weren’t updated and battery health dropped normally throughout many years. I have an iPhone 5s that’s five years old and it has 87% health. It’s on iOS 8.

Battery health is irrelevant if the phone isn’t updated, though. My family has two iPhone 6s. One on iOS 10, and the other one was recently forced to iOS 13 by Apple’s pathetic iOS 9/64-but activation bug.
The 6s on iOS 10 has 78% health and over twice the cycles than the one on iOS 13, which has 92% health.
Guess which one has FAR - FAR - better battery life? You guessed! The supposedly crippled device on iOS 10.
To each their own. I update my phones when new versions are released and don’t worry about battery life. My two 5s which are backup are on 12.4.3. I want security updates and new functionality before battery life.
 
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FeliApple

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Apr 8, 2015
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To each their own. I update my phones when new versions are released and don’t worry about battery life. My two 5s which are backup are on 12.4.3. I want security updates and new functionality before battery life.
How’s that related to my post?
 

FeliApple

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Apr 8, 2015
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My apologies. It’s simply a matter of choice. What do you prefer? Features or battery life and performance? Any of those is ultimately correct.

What I don’t find coherent is when people complain about battery life and keep updating, only to complain more, or when people erroneously blame battery health when it’s not relevant unless absolutely destroyed if the device is on its original version (the 6s on iOS 10 I referenced has less than 80% health and battery life is intact).
 
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HEK

macrumors 68040
Sep 24, 2013
3,453
5,874
US Eastern time zone
11 pro max coming up on four months.

Battery health still at 100%. Heavy user charge daily using 30 watt power adapter 90% of time. Over 100 cycles so far.

Never had any issues with updating to latest IOS on any of my iPhones since 3GS. Always run with latest version for security.
- - Post merged: - -

 
Last edited:

Martyimac

macrumors 68000
Aug 19, 2009
1,872
1,183
S. AZ.
This is true, but this is not true. The vast - vast - majority of people update the iOS version on their phones. Newer versions consume more battery, therefore, if the user keeps using his phone in the same way, the phone on its second iOS version will have less battery life than the first, therefore using more cycles and draining the battery faster, the phone on its third iOS version will have WAY less battery life than the second, so, assuming the user’s usage remains constant, the phone will use more cycles and battery health will drop even faster.

I have devices that weren’t updated and battery health dropped normally throughout many years. I have an iPhone 5s that’s five years old and it has 87% health. It’s on iOS 8.

Battery health is irrelevant if the phone isn’t updated, though. My family has two iPhone 6s. One on iOS 10, and the other one was recently forced to iOS 13 by Apple’s pathetic iOS 9/64-but activation bug.
The 6s on iOS 10 has 78% health and over twice the cycles than the one on iOS 13, which has 92% health.
Guess which one has FAR - FAR - better battery life? You guessed! The supposedly crippled device on iOS 10.
Lets agree to disagree. My 11 Pro has had nine (9) updates since its release. Since receiving it, my battery health has never wavered from 100% and my personal experience has been that my life has actually slightly improved.
 

D.T.

macrumors G3
Sep 15, 2011
9,555
7,770
Vilano Beach, FL
Saw this thread in the Latest Posts notifications, figured I'd take a look, contribute.

iPhone X, 64GB, Verizon (if any of that matters ...), ~26 months old (early pre-order from Nov 2017), Apple Battery Health showing 87% Max Capacity - Coconut battery showing Design Capacity at 89.3%, 441 load cycles (819 days old) :)
 

FeliApple

macrumors 65816
Apr 8, 2015
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Lets agree to disagree. My 11 Pro has had nine (9) updates since its release. Since receiving it, my battery health has never wavered from 100% and my personal experience has been that my life has actually slightly improved.
Major versions impact battery life. Not minor updates. All of your 11 Pro updates were within iOS 13. Now, get an iPhone 5s on iOS 7 and compare it to one on iOS 12.
Get your 11 Pro on iOS 16 and compare it to one on iOS 13. Battery life will be (a lot) worse, even with good battery health.
Have you ever used an old (2-3 generations old) iPhone, updated to the then-current version?
 

slooksterPSV

macrumors 68040
Apr 17, 2004
3,281
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Nowheresville
Major versions impact battery life. Not minor updates. All of your 11 Pro updates were within iOS 13. Now, get an iPhone 5s on iOS 7 and compare it to one on iOS 12.
Get your 11 Pro on iOS 16 and compare it to one on iOS 13. Battery life will be (a lot) worse, even with good battery health.
Have you ever used an old (2-3 generations old) iPhone, updated to the then-current version?
Well there's a problem with your logic here. The iPhone 11 uses the A13 which they advised could turn on specific sections of the CPU to do processing + the enhanced neural engine. That helps to improve power efficiency on the device and can help from putting too much strain on the battery. I have what... an A11 in my iPhone that doesn't have those efficiencies. While powerful, it still does draw from the battery a bit. My SE was an A9 which did worse on energy efficiency which caused battery to kind of go quickly with iOS 12. 13 its okayish. My old 7 is down to about 78% but again it has an A10 which isn't as efficient either.

Point being, the battery will only be as good as the internals in the system which can help to alleviate strain/pressure on the battery. That coupled with the environment, heat dispersion, etc. can drastically alter the batteries livelihood overall.
 

Martyimac

macrumors 68000
Aug 19, 2009
1,872
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Major versions impact battery life. Not minor updates. All of your 11 Pro updates were within iOS 13. Now, get an iPhone 5s on iOS 7 and compare it to one on iOS 12.
Get your 11 Pro on iOS 16 and compare it to one on iOS 13. Battery life will be (a lot) worse, even with good battery health.
Have you ever used an old (2-3 generations old) iPhone, updated to the then-current version?
If you had said major versions, I might not have responded, but you didn't initially.
 

FeliApple

macrumors 65816
Apr 8, 2015
1,295
469
Well there's a problem with your logic here. The iPhone 11 uses the A13 which they advised could turn on specific sections of the CPU to do processing + the enhanced neural engine. That helps to improve power efficiency on the device and can help from putting too much strain on the battery. I have what... an A11 in my iPhone that doesn't have those efficiencies. While powerful, it still does draw from the battery a bit. My SE was an A9 which did worse on energy efficiency which caused battery to kind of go quickly with iOS 12. 13 its okayish. My old 7 is down to about 78% but again it has an A10 which isn't as efficient either.

Point being, the battery will only be as good as the internals in the system which can help to alleviate strain/pressure on the battery. That coupled with the environment, heat dispersion, etc. can drastically alter the batteries livelihood overall.
It’s obvious that newer iPhones are more efficient if compared directly on the same version than older iPhones. Is it because Apple isn’t putting enough effort to optimise iOS for older devices? Maybe, but the cause is not relevant. Why? Because it has always been like this. Since the first iPhone. It will continue to be like this.

What can we do? Not update, like I do. Keep the iPhone on its original version forever and it will be fine, but don’t complain if you update and battery life decreases heavily. Don’t blame battery health if battery life decreases heavily. It’s the OS.
 

slooksterPSV

macrumors 68040
Apr 17, 2004
3,281
126
Nowheresville
It’s obvious that newer iPhones are more efficient if compared directly on the same version than older iPhones. Is it because Apple isn’t putting enough effort to optimise iOS for older devices? Maybe, but the cause is not relevant. Why? Because it has always been like this. Since the first iPhone. It will continue to be like this.

What can we do? Not update, like I do. Keep the iPhone on its original version forever and it will be fine, but don’t complain if you update and battery life decreases heavily. Don’t blame battery health if battery life decreases heavily. It’s the OS.
Nah. I don't blame the OS at all, personally. I know mine decreases due to it being in my pocket and being in a warmer than normal environment. Heat is killing my battery. Qi Chargers also make my phone incredibly hot too (not sure why) so I limit charging on them to only when absolutely necessary. I still don't blame the OS though. Its typical battery usage.
 

FeliApple

macrumors 65816
Apr 8, 2015
1,295
469
Nah. I don't blame the OS at all, personally. I know mine decreases due to it being in my pocket and being in a warmer than normal environment. Heat is killing my battery. Qi Chargers also make my phone incredibly hot too (not sure why) so I limit charging on them to only when absolutely necessary. I still don't blame the OS though. Its typical battery usage.
You are comparing apples to oranges. Both impact the battery negatively. One factor affecting it doesn’t mean that the other factor does not.
 

frank4

macrumors regular
Oct 17, 2011
175
27
Still 100% battery on iPhone 8 64GB (5 months old, bought mid August 2019).

To try to maintain good battery health I usually keep the charge 25-75% and stop charging if the phone gets noticeably warm.

The '8 battery is small and I was surprised to recently get over 5 days from a full charge, with minimal usage (typically 1 short call, a dozen text messages, and a few minutes Safari per day). Many phone settings have been tweaked for best battery life.