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Original poster
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iFixit today shared the second part of its teardown of Apple's Vision Pro headset, revealing several new insights about the device's construction, specifications, and repairability. Its initial disassembly provided the first comprehensive look at the device's internals last week.


iFixit examined the Vision Pro's microOLED display panels, also known as OLED on Silicon. Despite not technically having 4K resolution, the displays boast an incredible pixel density, with more than 50 Vision Pro pixels fitting into the space of a single iPhone 15 Pro pixel. This density translates to an estimated 3,386 pixels per inch and 34 pixels per degree, offering a rich visual experience that, while not 4K by conventional standards, exceeds the pixel count of a 4K TV.

The logic board of the Vision Pro houses the M2 chip and R1 co-processor, designed to manage the real-time data from the headset's numerous sensors. This includes outward-facing cameras, TrueDepth sensors, LiDAR sensors, IR illuminators, and IR cameras.

The teardown also highlights the Vision Pro's battery design, which, despite being "over-engineered" and difficult to open without damage, contains a range of hardware features such as temperature sensors and an accelerometer. The bespoke "big Lightning" cable outputs more voltage than a standard USB-C pack to meet the Vision Pro's processing demands. iFixit managed to design its own battery pack to circumvent the restrictions of Apple's design, providing double the battery life of the included pack.

iFixit revealed that the Vision Pro is relatively free from parts pairing, a common practice in Apple products that restricts repairability. This means components can be swapped between headsets without triggering "unrecognized part" warnings, a key benefit for repair enthusiasts and professionals.

The Vision Pro's repairability presents a mixed bag. On the plus side, its battery is modular, and parts that come into contact with the user's skin are easily replaceable. The lens inserts and light seals attach magnetically, simplifying the fitting process. Yet, the headset's front glass poses a significant vulnerability. Its fragility means that even fully functional sensors become useless with a cracked display, affecting the headset's overall durability and user experience. Comparatively, rival headsets from Meta offer a more durable design with exterior shells made of plastic and recessed cameras protected by a separate notch, making them significantly more robust than the Vision Pro. Overall, iFixit awards the Vision Pro a provisional repairability score of 4 out of 10.

Article Link: iFixit Examines Apple Vision Pro's Displays, Battery, and Repairability
 

neuropsychguy

macrumors 68020
Sep 29, 2008
2,295
5,367
more proof the vision pro ls not worth $3500. My gosh the battery pack is just some stacked iPhone batteries.
Maybe, but it also shows why the battery pack for $200 is probably reasonable: "The teardown also highlights the Vision Pro's battery design, which, despite being 'over-engineered' and difficult to open without damage, contains a range of hardware features such as temperature sensors and an accelerometer."

It's not just batteries slopped in a case like many battery packs are.
 

Jhonjhon236

macrumors member
Aug 18, 2022
69
388
Anyone saying this product isn't worth the money has either not tried the headset, or doesn't understand how much research and development works. Actually triggering to see.
That “triggers” you? over some random strangers on the internet having a different opinion then you? $3500 is a lot of money for what it is. Does that sentence make you scared? Angry? Upset?
 

Polinsky

macrumors regular
Oct 7, 2023
176
450
more proof the vision pro ls not worth $3500. My gosh the battery pack is just some stacked iPhone batteries.
This is what I just can't comprehend. You took an article that clearly emphasizes the complexity of the battery and simply fabricated a statement that the battery is simplicity itself with stacking of iphone batteries. How did you make the transition from the article's statement to your assertion?
 

jamessciacca

macrumors newbie
Oct 25, 2023
5
28
United States
That “triggers” you? over some random strangers on the internet having a different opinion then you? $3500 is a lot of money for what it is. Does that sentence make you scared? Angry? Upset?
Just impossible to have an opinion on something you have never tried. Not actually angry, just wish more people looked into things before posting opinions online.
 

jamessciacca

macrumors newbie
Oct 25, 2023
5
28
United States
This is what I just can't comprehend. You took an article that clearly emphasizes the complexity of the battery and simply fabricated a statement that the battery is simplicity itself with stacking of iphone batteries. How did you make the transition from the article's statement to your assertion?
That's what I'm saying people just say whatever, no one actually reads.
 

Timpetus

macrumors regular
Jun 13, 2014
216
396
Orange County, CA
Anyone saying this product isn't worth the money has either not tried the headset, or doesn't understand how much research and development works. Actually triggering to see.
Value is subjective. Your argument is that it cost Apple a lot to bring it to market, which is correct. Whether it provides enough value to justify the cost is up to each user to decide for themselves.
 

IIGS User

macrumors 65816
Feb 24, 2019
1,079
3,007
It's expensive. I get it. Get OVER it. It's WAY too expensive for me, and for most people. That's just first world first adopter issues. Everything that's new and complicated is super expensive if it's worth its salt.

Apple wasn't going to come out with an innovative, groundbreaking device and price it at $499. Sorry if that grinds people the wrong way, but that's just life. If they did people would complain that Apple undershot and missed the mark.

People with money to fritter away will snatch up every last one they make at the asking price. THOSE people pay the brunt of the R&D cost that is passed on to the consumer. SO when the second model comes out and is half the price with twice the capability more people can afford or justify the expense.

So go to an Apple store, try it on and ooh and ahh at it and remember that in 2 years, you'll probably be able to buy one for about $1500 with double the capability and a ton of applications.

By today's standards, this thing is a marvel of engineering and design. It truly is a glimpse into what the future holds. The impact it will have in the fields of research and design, engineering, medicine, and architecture are on par with the changes the iPhone has had on communication and commerce.
 

citysnaps

Suspended
Oct 10, 2011
11,685
25,335
It's expensive. I get it. Get OVER it. It's WAY too expensive for me, and for most people. That's just first world first adopter issues. Everything that's new and complicated is super expensive if it's worth its salt.

Apple wasn't going to come out with an innovative, groundbreaking device and price it at $499. Sorry if that grinds people the wrong way, but that's just life. If they did people would complain that Apple undershot and missed the mark.

People with money to fritter away will snatch up every last one they make at the asking price. THOSE people pay the brunt of the R&D cost that is passed on to the consumer. SO when the second model comes out and is half the price with twice the capability more people can afford or justify the expense.

So go to an Apple store, try it on and ooh and ahh at it and remember that in 2 years, you'll probably be able to buy one for about $1500 with double the capability and a ton of applications.

By today's standards, this thing is a marvel of engineering and design. It truly is a glimpse into what the future holds. The impact it will have in the fields of research and design, engineering, medicine, and architecture are on par with the changes the iPhone has had on communication and commerce.

Spot-on and well said.

It's very refreshing seeing more and more people understanding what a 1st gen AVP is about. The future is bright for Apple entering this market.
 
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