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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
56,995
19,865


Apple will be forced to allow users to utilize third-party app stores and payment systems, as well as make iMessage interoperable with other messaging services, by the European Union's Digital Markets Act (DMA), according to a newly published document from the European Commission.

European-Commisssion.jpg

In a questions and answers document on the Digital Markets Act titled "ensuring fair and open digital markets," published on Saturday, the European Commission explained and clarified what the Digital Markets Act will mean for companies that are designated as "gatekeepers." Apple is almost certain to be classified as a "gatekeeper," due to the size of its annual turnover in the EU, its ownership and operation of platforms with a large number of active users, and its "entrenched and durable position" due to how long it has met these criteria, and will therefore be subject to the rules set out in the DMA.

Last week, a leaked version of the DMA, seen by MacRumors, indicated that Apple could be forced to make major changes to the App Store, Messages, FaceTime, third-party browsers, and Siri in Europe. The latest document reiterates that gatekeepers will have to allow users to install third-party app stores, while developers will have to be able to interoperate with a gatekeeper's own services, promote their offers outside the gatekeeper's platform and use third-party payment systems, and access data gathered by a gatekeeper.

One of the new additions to the DMA is the requirement to make messaging, voice-calling, and video-calling services interoperable. The document clarifies that a third-party developer will have to request interoperability with a gatekeeper's service, and the gatekeeper will have to comply within a fixed timeframe. Immediately, gatekeepers will be required to support messaging between users on different platforms, but the DMA includes provisions to expand to group chats after two years, and video and audio calls after four years. The interoperability rules theoretically mean that Meta apps like WhatsApp or Messenger could request to interoperate with Apple's iMessage framework, and Apple will be forced to comply.

So far, Apple has heavily resisted attempts by governments to enforce changes to its operating systems and services. For example, Apple simply chose to pay a $5.5 million fine every week for ten weeks in the Netherlands instead of obey orders from the Authority for Consumers and Markets (ACM) to allow third-party payment systems in Dutch dating apps.

The DMA says that gatekeepers who ignore the rules will face fines of up to 10 percent of the company's total worldwide annual turnover, or 20 percent in the event of repeated infringements, as well as periodic penalties of up to 5 percent of the company's total worldwide annual turnover. Where gatekeepers perpetrate "systematic infringements," the European Commission will be able to impose additional sanctions, such as obliging a gatekeeper to sell a business or parts of it, including units, assets, intellectual property rights, or brands, or banning a gatekeeper from acquiring any company that provides services in the digital sector.

EU lawmakers provisionally approved the DMA in March. Once the final document is officially published, the European Parliament and the Council will need to approve it before it can come into effect. Digital competition chief Margrethe Vestager said last month that she expects the DMA to come into force "sometime in October."

Article Link: Impending EU Regulation to Force Apple to Allow Third-Party App Stores and Open Up iMessage
 

jclardy

macrumors 68040
Oct 6, 2008
3,759
3,255
And...this is what Apple gets for not listening to everyone asking them to open up a small bit to hold back the floodgates. The end result of this will be worse for both Apple, developers, and consumers. Every government entity will now have various restrictions to be followed requiring incredible amounts of work to support them all independently, versus just putting a "Don't enable this switch or your phone may get compromised" "developer" mode for installing third party apps.
 

nwcs

macrumors 68020
Sep 21, 2009
2,424
4,181
Tennessee
While I don’t think this is the right approach to a remedy, there does need to be more cooperation and interoperability between the different companies. It can be done without losing many of the unique benefits a platform provides. Indiscriminate interoperability, though, will create more unintended fallout than they ever anticipated.
 

ksec

macrumors 68020
Dec 23, 2015
2,052
2,306
Just listen to the wisdom on Macrumors, they have been calling for Apple to Pull out of the EU for more than 2 years.

Supporter of Apple in the EU should do a public poll, without Apple's support many of the iPhone features will cease working within the EU region. Politician should now have Apple on their agenda as Pro-Apple and Pro-iPhone.
 

NotTooLate

macrumors 6502
Jun 9, 2020
393
796
Its really interesting test case of governments fighting corporations on a global scale , the fact that a government can dictate which port an electrical device will have is really something crazy.

Can they decide that a game must support all platforms as well ? It would be nice to get GTA6 on MacOS when it comes out !!!

the EU is in trouble because non of the big tech is EU based , they are trying to make it easier for their own business to compete , which for now seems impossible as they are too far behind.
 

Mayanja

macrumors 6502
Jun 30, 2017
268
274
If iMessage was available on Android already, or FaceTime an open protocol as they originally promised, it wouldn't have come this far. But I'm all for regulating tech and breaking their power. Long live the EU.
 

siddavis

macrumors 6502a
Feb 23, 2009
549
1,542
Where gatekeepers perpetrate "systematic infringements," the European Commission will be able to impose additional sanctions, such as obliging a gatekeeper to sell a business or parts of it, including units, assets, intellectual property rights, or brands, or banning a gatekeeper from acquiring any company that provides services in the digital sector.
This could never be used for nefarious reasons. /s
 

mrat93

macrumors 68000
Dec 30, 2006
1,763
932
And...this is what Apple gets for not listening to everyone asking them to open up a small bit to hold back the floodgates. The end result of this will be worse for both Apple, developers, and consumers. Every government entity will now have various restrictions to be followed requiring incredible amounts of work to support them all independently, versus just putting a "Don't enable this switch or your phone may get compromised" "developer" mode for installing third party apps.
Yep, this exactly. The users wanted something basic, Epic pushed for something else, and now we’re getting Epic’s way. Good job, Tim!
 
  • Like
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Unregistered 4U

macrumors 604
Jul 22, 2002
6,503
4,422
Essentially blocking out the hope of competition from any EU companies. I mean, it’s already difficult to make a product people WANT to buy and use. Now, if any company in the EU does, in a few years what they’ve worked to create essentially becomes EU government property.

No surprise that companies of the size they’re concerned about aren’t EU companies. :)
 

Hails09

macrumors newbie
Apr 22, 2022
20
25


Apple will be forced to allow users to utilize third-party app stores and payment systems, as well as make iMessage interoperable with other messaging services, by the European Union's Digital Markets Act (DMA), according to a newly published document from the European Commission.

European-Commisssion.jpg

In a questions and answers document on the Digital Markets Act titled "ensuring fair and open digital markets," published on Saturday, the European Commission explained and clarified what the Digital Markets Act will mean for companies that are designated as "gatekeepers." Apple is almost certain to be classified as a "gatekeeper," due to the size of its annual turnover in the EU, its ownership and operation of platforms with a large number of active users, and its "entrenched and durable position" due to how long it has met these criteria, and will therefore be subject to the rules set out in the DMA.

Last week, a leaked version of the DMA, seen by MacRumors, indicated that Apple could be forced to make major changes to the App Store, Messages, FaceTime, third-party browsers, and Siri in Europe. The latest document reiterates that gatekeepers will have to allow users to install third-party app stores, while developers will have to be able to interoperate with a gatekeeper's own services, promote their offers outside the gatekeeper's platform and use third-party payment systems, and access data gathered by a gatekeeper.

One of the new additions to the DMA is the requirement to make messaging, voice-calling, and video-calling services interoperable. The document clarifies that a third-party developer will have to request interoperability with a gatekeeper's service, and the gatekeeper will have to comply within a fixed timeframe. Immediately, gatekeepers will be required to support messaging between users on different platforms, but the DMA includes provisions to expand to group chats after two years, and video and audio calls after four years. The interoperability rules theoretically mean that Meta apps like WhatsApp or Messenger could request to interoperate with Apple's iMessage framework, and Apple will be forced to comply.

So far, Apple has heavily resisted attempts by governments to enforce changes to its operating systems and services. For example, Apple simply chose to pay a $5.5 million fine every week for ten weeks in the Netherlands instead of obey orders from the Authority for Consumers and Markets (ACM) to allow third-party payment systems in Dutch dating apps.

The DMA says that gatekeepers who ignore the rules will face fines of up to 10 percent of the company's total worldwide annual turnover, or 20 percent in the event of repeated infringements, as well as periodic penalties of up to 5 percent of the company's total worldwide annual turnover. Where gatekeepers perpetrate "systematic infringements," the European Commission will be able to impose additional sanctions, such as obliging a gatekeeper to sell a business or parts of it, including units, assets, intellectual property rights, or brands, or banning a gatekeeper from acquiring any company that provides services in the digital sector.

EU lawmakers provisionally approved the DMA in March. Once the final document is officially published, the European Parliament and the Council will need to approve it before it can come into effect. Digital competition chief Margrethe Vestager said last month that she expects the DMA to come into force "sometime in October."

Article Link: Impending EU Regulation to Force Apple to Allow Third-Party App Stores and Open Up iMessage
Does it actually matter nobody is going to force you to download another App Store if you don’t want. My sister has a Samsung mobile & she has zero malware so stop telling scary story’s to people. Apple just don’t want anyone else getting a bit of there app money.
 
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