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MP 1,1-5,1 Installing Windows 10 on your Mac Pro 4,1/5,1 with updated video card.

jscipione

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Mar 27, 2017
305
157
I'm writing this post as a howto for others on how to get Windows 10 installed on their Mac Pro 5,1 more than I am seeking advice for myself. You may use this guide so that you don't have to go through the pain that I did. The first step is to get boot screen going so you can see what's happening in the pre-boot environment assuming you are using a PC graphics cards and not a Mac flashed one. Follow the instructions on https://forums.macrumors.com/thread...n.2180095/page-53?post=28255048#post-28255048 there's a video you can watch attached to the link, it's not too hard. Thank you to the crafty hackers that came up with this, in addition to a basic text-based boot screen you get GPU-accelerated h.264 encoding support, PCIe connected drives appearing as internal, macOS Catalina support and more. There's a lot more you can do with OpenCore but that's out of scope of this guide. This step is recommended but it is not required for the rest of the steps in this guide to work if you want Windows 10 but don't want to install the OpenCore boot loader for some reason. If you have an SSD in one of your four SATA-2 bays and you're running High Sierra and you want to install from a Windows 7 or Window 8 DVD you can install using Boot Camp Assistant that comes with High Sierra, if not, and for most of us that's not going to be good enough, it's going to take a bit more work than that.

I'm going to assume that you have Windows 10 on a USB flash drive either one that you created yourself or one of the official USB sticks from Microsoft. Depending on how old your Windows 10 USB stick is (mine was from 2015) the installer is going to try to create an MBR partition for you which won't boot on Mac Pro 5,1. I assume that if you have a newer Windows installer version it will setup an EFI NTFS partion so you won't need to do this next step. Install either Paragon or Tuxera (neither is free but it will come in handy later on, I used Paragon.) Setup your NTFS drive partition from Disk Utility in macOS. This could be one of your SATA-2 connected drives or it could be a PCIe connected SSD, I used the latter. Make sure that you pick Format: Microsoft NTFS and Scheme: GUID Partition Map, not Master Boot Record or Apple Partition Map.

At this point you're ready to install Windows but unfortunately you're going to need to put your Mac-flashed video card back in (assuming you have one) because Windows 10, even modern versions of it are not going to show any kind of video for example on an RX 580 (that's what I have) on a Mac Pro 5,1. Turn off your Mac, reinstall your Mac-flashed video card and boot up from your USB stick. It should show up in the text-based menu I referred to earlier. You may have to select Reset NVRAM option for the USB stick to show up. If you didn't flash your bootloader in the first step that's ok since presumably you have a Mac firmware video card installed here and so you can hold option and boot from the USB stick that way, it's just going to be harder to get back to Windows later on. Install Windows as normal, it will copy the files, reboot, then you'll get an option to run Express Setup. Pick Custom Setup and answer No to all the privacy invasive options: No, No, No, No => Next => No, No, No, No, No => Next. It will reboot one more time, ask you for your Username and Password and you're done with the Windows 10 installer.

Windows 10 should now be installed and you should be booted into Windows. You won't get the option to boot into macOS at this point and Windows will boot automatically. Don't panic you'll be able to get back to macOS in a bit. We need to install some drivers first. If you had created a Boot Camp USB stick all the way back at the start from the High Sierra Boot Camp Assistant and you've since upgraded to Mojave or Catalina or you're running on APFS in High Sierra don't bother with that version of the Boot Camp drivers because they're too old for the Boot Camp control panel to read your APFS disk. If you're running High Sierra on HFS+ and you don't plan to upgrade then you can skip this next step and install the Boot Camp drivers you downloaded from Boot Camp Assistant instead. Install 7zip from here: https://www.7-zip.org/ and Brigadier from here: https://github.com/timsutton/brigadier/releases. With Brigadier installed, run a couple of commands to download the iMac Pro Boot Camp drivers. Instructions are here: https://crystalidea.com/blog/bootcamp-and-windows-10-1903-may-update. Basics instructions are: load up a Command Prompt running as Administrator, run `brigadier.exe --model iMacPro1,1` to download the boot camp drivers meant for the iMacPro1,1 that understand how to read APFS disks and then run `msiexec /i BootCamp-041-55643\BootCamp\Drivers\Apple\BootCamp.msi` to install it. The exact command for the second part has changed slightly so you'll need to modify it but you'll be able to tell the version of the command you need to run from the file that gets downloaded in the first step. `brigadier.exe --model MacPro7,1` might also work at this point but I didn't try it. This will install the Boot Camp drivers you will need to select your macOS disk from the Boot Camp Control Panel among other things.

With the Boot Camp drivers installed you may now run Windows Update to get the latest version of Windows or download it from the Microsoft Support page if your Windows 10 install is too old for Windows Update to work like mine was. We're almost done, but we still need to install drivers for your Polaris or Navi based video card so that Windows 10 will show video with your upgraded PC card. Do NOT install the AMD Adrenalin 2020 Edition drivers from the AMD site as they will NOT give you video. Instead download the drivers from https://www.bootcampdrivers.com/. You want the ones from Download => Windows 10 ... => 2020 Drivers ... => Adrenalin January 2020 Red Gaming edition (Best FPS in games) or whatever the latest version is there if you're doing this in the future. Do not use the drivers labeled Legacy Macs (older than 2013) ... even though the Mac Pro 5,1 is older than 2013 it can use a video card from past 2013 so that's why you don't want to install that one. I assume you may also be able to run the Adrenalin January 2020 Red V2 Gaming edition (Best for emulation and non-gaming software) or the Adrenalin January 2020 Blue Enterprise edition (Best for MBP 16 inch and Radeon 500 series) but I installed the Red V2 Gaming edition (Best FPS in games) version.

Once these drivers are installed you may shutdown your Mac and reinstall your Polaris or Navi based video card, boot into Windows and video should now display. Open Windows Control Panel, navigate to the Boot Camp Control Panel and select your macOS disk as your Startup Disk and reboot to get back into macOS. You can boot back into Windows from the text based boot screen you presumably installed all the way back at the start.
 
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hwojtek

macrumors 65816
Jan 26, 2008
1,468
481
Poznan, Poland
I run the most recent genuine AMD Adrenaline driver on my R9 280X and have no problems whatsoever with video, even though I do EyeFinity on two monitors and hammer it in games beyond reason.

The bootcampdrivers.com files are actually applicable to owners of the genuine Mac-edition video cards provided by Apple. For flashed cards it's OK to use the genuine AMD drivers (unless the flashed card uses exactly the same ROM as the Apple-supplied card, which is unlikely).
 
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jscipione

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Mar 27, 2017
305
157
I run the most recent genuine AMD Adrenaline driver on my R9 280X and have no problems whatsoever with video, even though I do EyeFinity on two monitors and hammer it in games beyond reason.

The bootcampdrivers.com files are actually applicable to owners of the genuine Mac-edition video cards provided by Apple. For flashed cards it's OK to use the genuine AMD drivers (unless the flashed card uses exactly the same ROM as the Apple-supplied card, which is unlikely).
If that worked for you, great! But it didn’t work for me. I don’t have a Mac-flashed card, just a regular PC card. If you do have a Mac-flashed card then you don’t have to deal with most of the silliness described in this post and can install Windows with relative ease, you only have to grab the updated boot camp drivers afterwords.

I’d like to be wrong here - for Windows to show video on my card without going through this process, and for the normal drivers from AMD to work, but that just wasn’t my experience and I hope others may benefit by not falling into the same pitfalls that I did.
 
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hwojtek

macrumors 65816
Jan 26, 2008
1,468
481
Poznan, Poland
My card is a dual-BIOS one so I have a PC EFI ROM in one setting and an flashed regular BIOS with Mac EFI part added in the other. In both cases the card works in Windows exactly the same (OK, it is slightly faster in PC EFI ROM setting as the reflash introduces a bit less aggressive clock frequencies), not in MacOS though (bootscreens, card recognition etc).
Did you consider flashing yours?
 
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jscipione

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Mar 27, 2017
305
157
I don’t think there’s a reasonable way to flash an RX 580 outside of purchasing one from macvidcards.com.
 
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KingCachapa

macrumors member
Feb 29, 2020
52
2
so if I have a flashed card I can skip some stuff like you said? leaving us flashedbois with:

– Boot from USB Stick w/Windows 10 installer on it.
– Install onto a properly formatted SATA2 slot drive or PCIe drive (does this work fine with NVMe btw?).
– Reboot.
– Pick custom setup, click NO / NEXT / NO / NEXT.
– Reboot, username and password, done with installer.

– Install BootCamp and appropriate drivers for GPU

Is it safe to install without using OpenCore? I read about running UEFI being risky because of rewrites
 
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jscipione

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Mar 27, 2017
305
157
If you have a flashed GPU you don’t need to install OpenCore. The OpenCore rom enables trim on your SSD but that probably won’t make a difference in Windows. I didn’t test with a NVMe drive but it should work, someone here probably knows more. It seems like you got it now.
 
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TECK

macrumors 6502a
Nov 18, 2011
537
138
Latest OpenCore enables boot screen with a RX580 for example.
 
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jscipione

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Mar 27, 2017
305
157
Latest as in 0.5.7? I haven’t gotten around to updating yet but I’m looking forward to it. I had to reinstall Windows 10 to update from Home to Pro in order to recognize > 128GB of RAM in Windows and I ended up going through the whole process again and ran into the same issues getting video going on my RX 580 in Windows 10.
 
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TECK

macrumors 6502a
Nov 18, 2011
537
138
As of 0.5.6. I have Windows functional with native WiFi and Bluetooth drivers (no Brigadier) and OpenCore bootscreen. See this thread:
 
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KingCachapa

macrumors member
Feb 29, 2020
52
2
I'm writing this post as a howto for others on how to get Windows 10 installed on their Mac Pro 5,1 more than I am seeking advice for myself. You may use this guide so that you don't have to go through the pain that I did. The first step is to get boot screen going so you can see what's happening in the pre-boot environment assuming you are using a PC graphics cards and not a Mac flashed one. Follow the instructions on https://forums.macrumors.com/thread...n.2180095/page-53?post=28255048#post-28255048 there's a video you can watch attached to the link, it's not too hard. Thank you to the crafty hackers that came up with this, in addition to a basic text-based boot screen you get GPU-accelerated h.264 encoding support, PCIe connected drives appearing as internal, macOS Catalina support and more. There's a lot more you can do with OpenCore but that's out of scope of this guide. This step is recommended but it is not required for the rest of the steps in this guide to work if you want Windows 10 but don't want to install the OpenCore boot loader for some reason. If you have an SSD in one of your four SATA-2 bays and you're running High Sierra and you want to install from a Windows 7 or Window 8 DVD you can install using Boot Camp Assistant that comes with High Sierra, if not, and for most of us that's not going to be good enough, it's going to take a bit more work than that.

I'm going to assume that you have Windows 10 on a USB flash drive either one that you created yourself or one of the official USB sticks from Microsoft. Depending on how old your Windows 10 USB stick is (mine was from 2015) the installer is going to try to create an MBR partition for you which won't boot on Mac Pro 5,1. I assume that if you have a newer Windows installer version it will setup an EFI NTFS partion so you won't need to do this next step. Install either Paragon or Tuxera (neither is free but it will come in handy later on, I used Paragon.) Setup your NTFS drive partition from Disk Utility in macOS. This could be one of your SATA-2 connected drives or it could be a PCIe connected SSD, I used the latter. Make sure that you pick Format: Microsoft NTFS and Scheme: GUID Partition Map, not Master Boot Record or Apple Partition Map.

At this point you're ready to install Windows but unfortunately you're going to need to put your Mac-flashed video card back in (assuming you have one) because Windows 10, even modern versions of it are not going to show any kind of video for example on an RX 580 (that's what I have) on a Mac Pro 5,1. Turn off your Mac, reinstall your Mac-flashed video card and boot up from your USB stick. It should show up in the text-based menu I referred to earlier. You may have to select Reset NVRAM option for the USB stick to show up. If you didn't flash your bootloader in the first step that's ok since presumably you have a Mac firmware video card installed here and so you can hold option and boot from the USB stick that way, it's just going to be harder to get back to Windows later on. Install Windows as normal, it will copy the files, reboot, then you'll get an option to run Express Setup. Pick Custom Setup and answer No to all the privacy invasive options: No, No, No, No => Next => No, No, No, No, No => Next. It will reboot one more time, ask you for your Username and Password and you're done with the Windows 10 installer.

Windows 10 should now be installed and you should be booted into Windows. You won't get the option to boot into macOS at this point and Windows will boot automatically. Don't panic you'll be able to get back to macOS in a bit. We need to install some drivers first. If you had created a Boot Camp USB stick all the way back at the start from the High Sierra Boot Camp Assistant and you've since upgraded to Mojave or Catalina or you're running on APFS in High Sierra don't bother with that version of the Boot Camp drivers because they're too old for the Boot Camp control panel to read your APFS disk. If you're running High Sierra on HFS+ and you don't plan to upgrade then you can skip this next step and install the Boot Camp drivers you downloaded from Boot Camp Assistant instead. Install 7zip from here: https://www.7-zip.org/ and Brigadier from here: https://github.com/timsutton/brigadier/releases. With Brigadier installed, run a couple of commands to download the iMac Pro Boot Camp drivers. Instructions are here: https://crystalidea.com/blog/bootcamp-and-windows-10-1903-may-update. Basics instructions are: load up a Command Prompt running as Administrator, run `brigadier.exe --model iMacPro1,1` to download the boot camp drivers meant for the iMacPro1,1 that understand how to read APFS disks and then run `msiexec /i BootCamp-041-55643\BootCamp\Drivers\Apple\BootCamp.msi` to install it. The exact command for the second part has changed slightly so you'll need to modify it but you'll be able to tell the version of the command you need to run from the file that gets downloaded in the first step. `brigadier.exe --model MacPro7,1` might also work at this point but I didn't try it. This will install the Boot Camp drivers you will need to select your macOS disk from the Boot Camp Control Panel among other things.

With the Boot Camp drivers installed you may now run Windows Update to get the latest version of Windows or download it from the Microsoft Support page if your Windows 10 install is too old for Windows Update to work like mine was. We're almost done, but we still need to install drivers for your Polaris or Navi based video card so that Windows 10 will show video with your upgraded PC card. Do NOT install the AMD Adrenalin 2020 Edition drivers from the AMD site as they will NOT give you video. Instead download the drivers from https://www.bootcampdrivers.com/. You want the ones from Download => Windows 10 ... => 2020 Drivers ... => Adrenalin January 2020 Red Gaming edition (Best FPS in games) or whatever the latest version is there if you're doing this in the future. Do not use the drivers labeled Legacy Macs (older than 2013) ... even though the Mac Pro 5,1 is older than 2013 it can use a video card from past 2013 so that's why you don't want to install that one. I assume you may also be able to run the Adrenalin January 2020 Red V2 Gaming edition (Best for emulation and non-gaming software) or the Adrenalin January 2020 Blue Enterprise edition (Best for MBP 16 inch and Radeon 500 series) but I installed the Red V2 Gaming edition (Best FPS in games) version.

Once these drivers are installed you may shutdown your Mac and reinstall your Polaris or Navi based video card, boot into Windows and video should now display. Open Windows Control Panel, navigate to the Boot Camp Control Panel and select your macOS disk as your Startup Disk and reboot to get back into macOS. You can boot back into Windows from the text based boot screen you presumably installed all the way back at the start.

I need a quick hand please (= Thanks for taking the time to do this guide. I made it and installed Windows successfully I've reached the desktop for the first time. Specifically need help with the Brigadier part:

1- I downloaded the iMacPro 1,1 package successfully. Brought it over to the cMP in Windows10 so I can install all the drivers and get wifi etc. and get going with everything else. (did not detect my WiFi at all, and I don't have ethernet accessible near the cMP).

1.1- When I launch the installer, I get the message "This version of Boot Camp is not intended for this computer model."

Now, I know about the hybridization part of OC for our cMPs, which as I understand it is recommended whether we use Windows or not. I intend to do that for the main Mojave side of this setup, but I haven't gotten around to it yet.

Do I have to do hybridization first on the Mac OS side before this works? Does it affect updates in MacOS / Windows, out of curiosity?

Thanks a ton in advance
 
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Arthur Getting

macrumors newbie
Jun 7, 2020
3
0
I'm not sure if this is the right place to ask this question buts it's my first time on Mac Rumors. I installed Windows 10 on my Mac Pro 5.1 and ended up signing multiple Secure Boot certificates to it. I am worried about corruption on my Mac and bricking it. Does anyone know how to fix this? I bought a new graphics card and want to update it to Mojave but am don't want to do more damage. Does anyone have any advice or can push me in the right direction?
 
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KingCachapa

macrumors member
Feb 29, 2020
52
2
I'm writing this post as a howto for others on how to get Windows 10 installed on their Mac Pro 5,1 more than I am seeking advice for myself. You may use this guide so that you don't have to go through the pain that I did. The first step is to get boot screen going so you can see what's happening in the pre-boot environment assuming you are using a PC graphics cards and not a Mac flashed one. Follow the instructions on https://forums.macrumors.com/thread...n.2180095/page-53?post=28255048#post-28255048 there's a video you can watch attached to the link, it's not too hard. Thank you to the crafty hackers that came up with this, in addition to a basic text-based boot screen you get GPU-accelerated h.264 encoding support, PCIe connected drives appearing as internal, macOS Catalina support and more. There's a lot more you can do with OpenCore but that's out of scope of this guide. This step is recommended but it is not required for the rest of the steps in this guide to work if you want Windows 10 but don't want to install the OpenCore boot loader for some reason. If you have an SSD in one of your four SATA-2 bays and you're running High Sierra and you want to install from a Windows 7 or Window 8 DVD you can install using Boot Camp Assistant that comes with High Sierra, if not, and for most of us that's not going to be good enough, it's going to take a bit more work than that.

I'm going to assume that you have Windows 10 on a USB flash drive either one that you created yourself or one of the official USB sticks from Microsoft. Depending on how old your Windows 10 USB stick is (mine was from 2015) the installer is going to try to create an MBR partition for you which won't boot on Mac Pro 5,1. I assume that if you have a newer Windows installer version it will setup an EFI NTFS partion so you won't need to do this next step. Install either Paragon or Tuxera (neither is free but it will come in handy later on, I used Paragon.) Setup your NTFS drive partition from Disk Utility in macOS. This could be one of your SATA-2 connected drives or it could be a PCIe connected SSD, I used the latter. Make sure that you pick Format: Microsoft NTFS and Scheme: GUID Partition Map, not Master Boot Record or Apple Partition Map.

At this point you're ready to install Windows but unfortunately you're going to need to put your Mac-flashed video card back in (assuming you have one) because Windows 10, even modern versions of it are not going to show any kind of video for example on an RX 580 (that's what I have) on a Mac Pro 5,1. Turn off your Mac, reinstall your Mac-flashed video card and boot up from your USB stick. It should show up in the text-based menu I referred to earlier. You may have to select Reset NVRAM option for the USB stick to show up. If you didn't flash your bootloader in the first step that's ok since presumably you have a Mac firmware video card installed here and so you can hold option and boot from the USB stick that way, it's just going to be harder to get back to Windows later on. Install Windows as normal, it will copy the files, reboot, then you'll get an option to run Express Setup. Pick Custom Setup and answer No to all the privacy invasive options: No, No, No, No => Next => No, No, No, No, No => Next. It will reboot one more time, ask you for your Username and Password and you're done with the Windows 10 installer.

Windows 10 should now be installed and you should be booted into Windows. You won't get the option to boot into macOS at this point and Windows will boot automatically. Don't panic you'll be able to get back to macOS in a bit. We need to install some drivers first. If you had created a Boot Camp USB stick all the way back at the start from the High Sierra Boot Camp Assistant and you've since upgraded to Mojave or Catalina or you're running on APFS in High Sierra don't bother with that version of the Boot Camp drivers because they're too old for the Boot Camp control panel to read your APFS disk. If you're running High Sierra on HFS+ and you don't plan to upgrade then you can skip this next step and install the Boot Camp drivers you downloaded from Boot Camp Assistant instead. Install 7zip from here: https://www.7-zip.org/ and Brigadier from here: https://github.com/timsutton/brigadier/releases. With Brigadier installed, run a couple of commands to download the iMac Pro Boot Camp drivers. Instructions are here: https://crystalidea.com/blog/bootcamp-and-windows-10-1903-may-update. Basics instructions are: load up a Command Prompt running as Administrator, run `brigadier.exe --model iMacPro1,1` to download the boot camp drivers meant for the iMacPro1,1 that understand how to read APFS disks and then run `msiexec /i BootCamp-041-55643\BootCamp\Drivers\Apple\BootCamp.msi` to install it. The exact command for the second part has changed slightly so you'll need to modify it but you'll be able to tell the version of the command you need to run from the file that gets downloaded in the first step. `brigadier.exe --model MacPro7,1` might also work at this point but I didn't try it. This will install the Boot Camp drivers you will need to select your macOS disk from the Boot Camp Control Panel among other things.

With the Boot Camp drivers installed you may now run Windows Update to get the latest version of Windows or download it from the Microsoft Support page if your Windows 10 install is too old for Windows Update to work like mine was. We're almost done, but we still need to install drivers for your Polaris or Navi based video card so that Windows 10 will show video with your upgraded PC card. Do NOT install the AMD Adrenalin 2020 Edition drivers from the AMD site as they will NOT give you video. Instead download the drivers from https://www.bootcampdrivers.com/. You want the ones from Download => Windows 10 ... => 2020 Drivers ... => Adrenalin January 2020 Red Gaming edition (Best FPS in games) or whatever the latest version is there if you're doing this in the future. Do not use the drivers labeled Legacy Macs (older than 2013) ... even though the Mac Pro 5,1 is older than 2013 it can use a video card from past 2013 so that's why you don't want to install that one. I assume you may also be able to run the Adrenalin January 2020 Red V2 Gaming edition (Best for emulation and non-gaming software) or the Adrenalin January 2020 Blue Enterprise edition (Best for MBP 16 inch and Radeon 500 series) but I installed the Red V2 Gaming edition (Best FPS in games) version.

Once these drivers are installed you may shutdown your Mac and reinstall your Polaris or Navi based video card, boot into Windows and video should now display. Open Windows Control Panel, navigate to the Boot Camp Control Panel and select your macOS disk as your Startup Disk and reboot to get back into macOS. You can boot back into Windows from the text based boot screen you presumably installed all the way back at the start.
---- SOLVED
 
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jaapaap79

macrumors newbie
Aug 6, 2020
4
0
I tried following the instructions to install Bootcamp on Windows 10 that I installed through the OpenCore tutorial, however I don’t get the Bootcamp icon in my task bar. And even worse, my OpenCore boot menu doesn’t show anymore either so I’m stuck with Windows 10 on my cMP 5,1.

Any ideas what I can do to boot back to Mac OS X? I’ve already tried resetting the NVRAM but that no longer seems to work either :(
 
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jaapaap79

macrumors newbie
Aug 6, 2020
4
0
I tried following the instructions to install Bootcamp on Windows 10 that I installed through the OpenCore tutorial, however I don’t get the Bootcamp icon in my task bar. And even worse, my OpenCore boot menu doesn’t show anymore either so I’m stuck with Windows 10 on my cMP 5,1.

Any ideas what I can do to boot back to Mac OS X? I’ve already tried resetting the NVRAM but that no longer seems to work either :(
Actually it looks like some Windows Update caused my OpenCore breakage. It’s installed on the primary drive and is now booting automatically without the boot menu showing up.
 
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cdf

macrumors 65816
Jul 27, 2012
1,189
1,141
Actually it looks like some Windows Update caused my OpenCore breakage. It’s installed on the primary drive and is now booting automatically without the boot menu showing up.

You can prevent this by setting the BootProtect property to "Bootstrap" as described in the OpenCore manual.
 
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jscipione

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Mar 27, 2017
305
157
Addendum to this post:

Don’t install bootcampdrivers.com video drivers. Download the regular AMD drivers and install them using the following really fun method:

Put BOTH your Mac flashed card and Polaris (or Navi based) cards in with minimally required power (1x 6pin each). We aren’t going to stress the video card here so underpowered is ok for this step.

Boot with the Mac flashed card into Windows. Install the AMD drivers. Since the Polaris based card is present the driver will detect the card and continue.When prompted to reboot, shutdown. Take Mac flashed card out and put just the Polaris card in.

Now here’s the fun part. The driver has to finish installing before it will show you any video, when you first boot it isn’t installed yet. So you have to wait a minute or two, push enter to prompt the login screen, login blind, push enter and pray you entered your password correctly. Once logged in the driver will finish the installation process and reboot automatically when finished.

When the computer reboots you’ll have video!
 
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