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General iOS 12 VS Android P 9.0

iOS 12 VS Android P ?


  • Total voters
    89
  • Poll closed .

Austin4321

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Aug 16, 2016
5
1
So iOS 12 just came out. Both iOS 12 and Android P are incremental updates with optimisations and performance improvements.
iOS 12 is said to double the speed and performance across all Apple devices starting from iPhone 5S, that’s crazy as the 5S was launched back in 2013. It mainly optimises performance with apps launching upto 40% faster on even older devices. But it doesn't have a visual overhaul. Where as Android has many AI advancements and some visual changes.

So which update did you like more iOS 12 or Android P ?

 
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justint1989

macrumors member
Sep 25, 2017
59
29
It was a much needed overhaul on speed. Although I’m also surprised to see Apple didn’t drop all devices with 1GB of ram.
 
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Tinototem

macrumors regular
Sep 28, 2010
107
82
Sweden
It was a much needed overhaul on speed. Although I’m also surprised to see Apple didn’t drop all devices with 1GB of ram.
If a device can run iOS 11 it makes no sense to drop it from an improved version that should run more smooth and faster.
Personally i am happy about this since my old phones get used by other people so they get the benefit and since they did not announce a new iPad Pro my iPad air will tug along with iOS 12 :)
 

DNichter

macrumors G3
Apr 27, 2015
9,053
10,256
Philadelphia, PA
I have been asking people who bring up Android innovation, but I can't seem to get any answers. What are some innovative features introduced in Android over the last few years?
 

justint1989

macrumors member
Sep 25, 2017
59
29
I have been asking people who bring up Android innovation, but I can't seem to get any answers. What are some innovative features introduced in Android over the last few years?

It’s been under the hood, and incremental changes to the software.
The natural evolution of technology has come from the hardware over the last two years. One example being Samsung’s Infinity Display, or even their Edge display two years before it.

I think we’ve reached a peak cramming features into the OS, it’s time to refine them, strip out the gimmicks and give us the speed. Right now iOS and Android remind me of what Windows was. Bloated and in need of a diet.
[doublepost=1528408429][/doublepost]
If a device can run iOS 11 it makes no sense to drop it from an improved version that should run more smooth and faster.
Personally i am happy about this since my old phones get used by other people so they get the benefit and since they did not announce a new iPad Pro my iPad air will tug along with iOS 12 :)

I suppose you’re right!

I wonder what they will do next year. I’m sure the 5S will finally get the boot, but will they kill of the 6 or try to extend it’s aging hardware. Only reason I bring it up is the fact that the 5S and 6 are largely the Same performance wise. The A8 was probably the biggest under proforming SOC since the A4.
 

hunt2013

macrumors regular
Feb 15, 2011
226
109
I have been asking people who bring up Android innovation, but I can't seem to get any answers. What are some innovative features introduced in Android over the last few years?

Notification channels are a big one for me. You can silence or change notification preferences per app but the app can have separate types of notifications. Like say, amazon has an order status Channel and a promotions channel. You could keep the order status channel to have normal notifications and have the promotions channel only show up as an app badge or appear silently in Notification Center.

Another would be quick restart for updates where the update installs and then all you have to do is reboot the phone and there is no difference in times for how long it takes as it seemlessly switches over to the new version or reboot.

From a development standpoint I can quick launch a new version of an app I’m working on without having to do a full recompile like on iOS. I don’t know if this is entirely IDE side but all I know is xcode takes much longer to load a newer app version vs. Android studio for testing.
 

DNichter

macrumors G3
Apr 27, 2015
9,053
10,256
Philadelphia, PA
It’s been under the hood, and incremental changes to the software.
The natural evolution of technology has come from the hardware over the last two years. One example being Samsung’s Infinity Display, or even their Edge display two years before it.

I think we’ve reached a peak cramming features into the OS, it’s time to refine them, strip out the gimmicks and give us the speed. Right now iOS and Android remind me of what Windows was. Bloated and in need of a diet.
[doublepost=1528408429][/doublepost]

I suppose you’re right!

I wonder what they will do next year. I’m sure the 5S will finally get the boot, but will they kill of the 6 or try to extend it’s aging hardware. Only reason I bring it up is the fact that the 5S and 6 are largely the Same performance wise. The A8 was probably the biggest under proforming SOC since the A4.

Okay, so nothing specific. Someone in another thread mentioned how Android was innovating and I just didn’t see it. Thanks.
[doublepost=1528419554][/doublepost]
Notification channels are a big one for me. You can silence or change notification preferences per app but the app can have separate types of notifications. Like say, amazon has an order status Channel and a promotions channel. You could keep the order status channel to have normal notifications and have the promotions channel only show up as an app badge or appear silently in Notification Center.

Another would be quick restart for updates where the update installs and then all you have to do is reboot the phone and there is no difference in times for how long it takes as it seemlessly switches over to the new version or reboot.

From a development standpoint I can quick launch a new version of an app I’m working on without having to do a full recompile like on iOS. I don’t know if this is entirely IDE side but all I know is xcode takes much longer to load a newer app version vs. Android studio for testing.

Awesome, appreciate that. The notifications sound good. Somewhat similar to Apple’s implementation in iOS 12? I like the updates feature also, I do agree that this is a lengthy, more involved process on the iOS side. Maybe we’ll get there now that they’ve enabled automatic updates.
 

pika2000

Suspended
Jun 22, 2007
5,587
4,899
The biggest difference is, no matter how great Android P is/will be, only a small percentage of Android users will enjoy it. Heck, how many people have Oreo today? And to add on top of that, majority of it (by statistics) will be Samsung users, who won't realize anything different since Samsung customized their Android quite extensively into the "Samsung Experience."

It's getting harder and harder to be excited about any new Android version.
 

Abazigal

Contributor
Jul 18, 2011
13,383
11,720
Singapore
It was a much needed overhaul on speed. Although I’m also surprised to see Apple didn’t drop all devices with 1GB of ram.

There are likely still a ton of people using the iPhone 6 and 6+. Together with people seemingly opting to hold on to their phones for way longer, it’s too early to retire these phones just yet.
 

pika2000

Suspended
Jun 22, 2007
5,587
4,899
I feel as though Google has gotten to a point where their UI is just plain better.
They're so much "better" that they have to change their settings icon themes on every new version.
And note that most users will be seeing their respective OEM's UI. Based on statistics, the "face" of Android are either Samsung Experience, Huawei's EMUI, or Xiaomi's MIUI. Only a small number of users (Pixel and Android One users) would actually be using Google's default UI.
 
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Michael Goff

Suspended
Jul 5, 2012
13,329
7,415
They're so much "better" that they have to change their settings icon themes on every new version.
And note that most users will be seeing their respective OEM's UI. Based on statistics, the "face" of Android are either Samsung Experience, Huawei's EMUI, or Xiaomi's MIUI. Only a small number of users (Pixel and Android One users) would actually be using Google's default UI.

I meant stuff like navigation, but I guess you do you if icons are the most important thing.
[doublepost=1528442091][/doublepost]
Okay, so nothing specific. Someone in another thread mentioned how Android was innovating and I just didn’t see it. Thanks.
[doublepost=1528419554][/doublepost]

Awesome, appreciate that. The notifications sound good. Somewhat similar to Apple’s implementation in iOS 12? I like the updates feature also, I do agree that this is a lengthy, more involved process on the iOS side. Maybe we’ll get there now that they’ve enabled automatic updates.

Yes and no. In theory, channels will give you a much more granular approach to notifications than what iOS will give you.
 
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DNichter

macrumors G3
Apr 27, 2015
9,053
10,256
Philadelphia, PA
The biggest difference is, no matter how great Android P is/will be, only a small percentage of Android users will enjoy it. Heck, how many people have Oreo today? And to add on top of that, majority of it (by statistics) will be Samsung users, who won't realize anything different since Samsung customized their Android quite extensively into the "Samsung Experience."

It's getting harder and harder to be excited about any new Android version.

Fair point. On the iOS side, we tend to joke about it, but I think it's a valid point that doesn't seem to be getting any better on the Android end. I keep hearing about all this innovation on the Android side, which they do have some nice features, but what does it matter when the majority of people aren't going to use it? I suppose it could change over time though as I am sure Google sees this as a downfall and wants to try and emulate Apple's approach.
 

pika2000

Suspended
Jun 22, 2007
5,587
4,899
No, as in Google's gesture controls are better than Apple's.
And? Like I said, majority of users will be on either Samsung Experience, EMUI, onr MIUI. EMUI and MIUI don’t even have the app drawer, and mimick iOS more than AOSP. Only few Pixel and Android One users will be using Google’s stock UI experience.

Google should just do silent updates like they do with Chrome on desktop. What’s the point in showing off Android features that won’t even be enjoyed by more than 10% of its user base.
 
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Michael Goff

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Jul 5, 2012
13,329
7,415
In what way? (Not a challenge, but a sincere inquiry)
I've rather enjoyed the gestures on the iPhone X but I am curious in what ways Google's are better.

I find it easier to scrub through apps using the Google way than the Apple way. There's also the fact that they feel more intentional. When you gesture to the middle, it just opens up multitasking on the Pixel.
[doublepost=1528478481][/doublepost]
And? Like I said, majority of users will be on either Samsung Experience, EMUI, onr MIUI. EMUI and MIUI don’t even have the app drawer, and mimick iOS more than AOSP. Only few Pixel and Android One users will be using Google’s stock UI experience.

Google should just do silent updates like they do with Chrome on desktop. What’s the point in showing off Android features that won’t even be enjoyed by more than 10% of its user base.

They have app drawers, just not by default. And the topic is Android P. Only one phone has Android P. That's why we are talking about it.
 
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hunt2013

macrumors regular
Feb 15, 2011
226
109
And the topic is Android P. Only one phone has Android P. That's why we are talking about it.

Actually thanks to Androids new project treble with Oreo, any phone that supports it is a lot easier to update as they all share the same base system now .

I believe there are 6? Phones with access to the Android P beta where in previous years it was limited to Nexus or Pixel phones . Google is pushing hard to make it easier for OEMs to do updates and it's showing .
 
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Michael Goff

Suspended
Jul 5, 2012
13,329
7,415
Actually thanks to Androids new project treble with Oreo, any phone that supports it is a lot easier to update as they all share the same base system now .

I believe there are 6? Phones with access to the Android P beta where in previous years it was limited to Nexus or Pixel phones . Google is pushing hard to make it easier for OEMs to do updates and it's showing .

You're right, my mistake. I think those all basically have stock UI for the moment too, if I'm not mistaken.
 

pika2000

Suspended
Jun 22, 2007
5,587
4,899
They have app drawers, just not by default. And the topic is Android P. Only one phone has Android P. That's why we are talking about it.
You must have not used a Xiaomi phone before. Oh well.

The topic is: you claim Google is doing much better on Android. My point is that whatever “good” things Google has on Android, the real life experience will be muted or even gone considering the way Android phones are updated and how majority of Android users are not faced with stock Android.

And back to the thread’s topic, about iOS 12 vs Android P, I’m saying that iOS 12 is going to be better as it will be enjoyed by majority of the users of the platform vs Android P. Ie. iOS 12 will have a much more positive impact.
[doublepost=1528519879][/doublepost]
Actually thanks to Androids new project treble with Oreo, any phone that supports it is a lot easier to update as they all share the same base system now .

I believe there are 6? Phones with access to the Android P beta where in previous years it was limited to Nexus or Pixel phones . Google is pushing hard to make it easier for OEMs to do updates and it's showing .
Access to the beta doesn’t mean the OEMs will adopt stock Android (except for Android One devices). That just mean those people with those phones can help Google in beta testing P (vs just Pixel users). That’s all. You won’t see Huawei or Xiaomi abandoning their EMUI/MIUI.
 

Michael Goff

Suspended
Jul 5, 2012
13,329
7,415
You must have not used a Xiaomi phone before. Oh well.

The topic is: you claim Google is doing much better on Android. My point is that whatever “good” things Google has on Android, the real life experience will be muted or even gone considering the way Android phones are updated and how majority of Android users are not faced with stock Android.

And back to the thread’s topic, about iOS 12 vs Android P, I’m saying that iOS 12 is going to be better as it will be enjoyed by majority of the users of the platform vs Android P. Ie. iOS 12 will have a much more positive impact.
[doublepost=1528519879][/doublepost]
Access to the beta doesn’t mean the OEMs will adopt stock Android (except for Android One devices). That just mean those people with those phones can help Google in beta testing P (vs just Pixel users). That’s all. You won’t see Huawei or Xiaomi abandoning their EMUI/MIUI.

So is the Honda Civic better than the Ferrari? And no, I'm not saying that iOS is a Civic and Android is Ferrari. I'm just pointing out quantity and quality aren't tied .
 
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cola79

macrumors 6502
Sep 19, 2013
278
248
I have used Android for years and it never came near the experience iOS offers when using your phone daily.

Of course some of the iOS limitations in case of data saving and sending (needs third party apps or works only between iOSs or does not work at all) are annoying, but all that what works simply works in the most convenient way.

Using Android always felt like using beta software. And everything can get your personal data, only opt-out instead of opt-in, so basically installing an app means giving away all your personal data.

And you can feel that the apps struggle from having to work on every phone of the heavily segmented Android universe. You never get the feeling it just works, instead you hope it will still work tomorrow.

In my opinion iOS is better prepared for the future than googles Android. People use their phones for much longer now and that is a risk for Android.

One bigger security risk and google will not recover, because getting all phones to the same security level will take them about ten years from now. There are lots of systems running still on Android 4.

The segmentation and lack of privacy will break googles neck. Nokia also believed they can continue as before, everyone is using their product, too big to fail etc..
 

Michael Goff

Suspended
Jul 5, 2012
13,329
7,415
I have used Android for years and it never came near the experience iOS offers when using your phone daily.

Of course some of the iOS limitations in case of data saving and sending (needs third party apps or works only between iOSs or does not work at all) are annoying, but all that what works simply works in the most convenient way.

Using Android always felt like using beta software. And everything can get your personal data, only opt-out instead of opt-in, so basically installing an app means giving away all your personal data.

And you can feel that the apps struggle from having to work on every phone of the heavily segmented Android universe. You never get the feeling it just works, instead you hope it will still work tomorrow.

In my opinion iOS is better prepared for the future than googles Android. People use their phones for much longer now and that is a risk for Android.

One bigger security risk and google will not recover, because getting all phones to the same security level will take them about ten years from now. There are lots of systems running still on Android 4.

The segmentation and lack of privacy will break googles neck. Nokia also believed they can continue as before, everyone is using their product, too big to fail etc..

No, there really aren't.

Screenshot_20180609-120522.png
 
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bluewomble88

macrumors regular
Oct 9, 2009
156
30
I have used Android for years and it never came near the experience iOS offers when using your phone daily.

Of course some of the iOS limitations in case of data saving and sending (needs third party apps or works only between iOSs or does not work at all) are annoying, but all that what works simply works in the most convenient way.

Using Android always felt like using beta software. And everything can get your personal data, only opt-out instead of opt-in, so basically installing an app means giving away all your personal data.

And you can feel that the apps struggle from having to work on every phone of the heavily segmented Android universe. You never get the feeling it just works, instead you hope it will still work tomorrow.

In my opinion iOS is better prepared for the future than googles Android. People use their phones for much longer now and that is a risk for Android.

One bigger security risk and google will not recover, because getting all phones to the same security level will take them about ten years from now. There are lots of systems running still on Android 4.

The segmentation and lack of privacy will break googles neck. Nokia also believed they can continue as before, everyone is using their product, too big to fail etc..

Every single word of this is complete nonsense. Sorry but you're painting a picture that has never existed.
 
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