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Apple is facing a global shortage of certain components for some of its MacBook and iPad models, causing the Cupertino tech giant and its suppliers to postpone production of the products, according to a new report from Nikkei Asia.

ipad-pro-and-macbook-pro.jpg

According to the report, MacBook production is being hindered due to the shortage of chips mounted onto the circuit board before final assembly, which is a key step in the overall production process. iPad production is being impacted due to display and display component shortages, the report adds.

In response to the pushed back production, Apple has postponed component orders for the two devices to the second half of the year. While MacBook and iPad production is being directly impacted, iPhone production is so far not affected. However, industry sources say that supplies for iPhone components are limited.
Production plans for Apple's iconic iPhones have so far not been affected by the supply shortage, although the supply of some components for the devices is "quite tight," according to two sources. Overall, the component shortage remains a supply chain issue for Apple and has not yet had an impact on product availability for consumers, Nikkei has learned.
Apple is widely expected to be launching new iPad Pro models and possibly redesigned MacBook Pros with Apple silicon in the coming months. Bloomberg has reported that new iPad models with drastically improved performance and a new mini-LED display are simply weeks away from launch.

While Nikkei doesn't specify which iPad and MacBook models are being impacted due to the shortage, it certainly seems plausible that the delayed assembly of the products could result in some form of a delayed product announcement from Apple.

Article Link: iPad and MacBook Production Reportedly Delayed Due to Global Chip Shortage
 
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vmistery

Contributor
Apr 6, 2010
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My OG 9’7” iPad Pro is still usable but has a cracked screen, was looking to upgrade to this next pro so shame it’s delayed. May just pick up an Air now as I don’t really need the additional power anyhoo
 

wanha

macrumors 6502
Oct 30, 2020
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Apple is THE premium customer in tech and will always get preferential treatment from suppliers because of that.

This puts Apple in a better spot to weather this shortage than every other company on earth.

Time to collectively take a deep breath and relax that unnecessary tension in our sphincters.
 

ruka.snow

macrumors 68000
Jun 6, 2017
1,580
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Scotland
Logical that there is a shortage. Hopefully this means we can get some manufacturing diversity, plenty of room in Europe to setup and they could start manufacturing on each continent.

Also need to add, it would be daft to think the chip shortage wouldn't affect Apple. There is a huge amount of demand for GPU's and CPU's never mind all the support chips, Apple is a big customer on their on but that just means they might have an abundant supply of M1 chips. There are a lot more components on the board needed and even if we got a new plant in Europe and USA it would take multiple years to setup and Nikon and others need to produce all the equipment, it isn't just sitting in some showroom ready to go.
 
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wanha

macrumors 6502
Oct 30, 2020
253
602
There’s only a chip shortage because of demand, so why not set up infrastructure so we’re able to build more chips here in the U.S.
The fundamental problem is that in the year 2000, there were about 30 companies that made their own integrated circuits.

Then, they discovered that it's a lot cheaper to outsource, and now we have only a handful of companies producing chips while the demand is higher than it has ever been. Even AMD outsource their actual chip manufacturing to companies like TSMC.

To combat this, Intel and TSMC have both just recently announced plans to invest a lot of money ($20 and $100 billion, respectively) to increase capacity to meet demand. Intel is also planning to open its doors to other manufacturers, like TSMC and Samsung are already doing.

TL;DR version: investments are being made to combat the chip shortage, but it will take some time (probably going well into 2022) before the increased capacity becomes available.
 

Homme

macrumors 6502a
Jun 17, 2014
758
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Sydney
Considering this is the case then like how COVID delayed apples lineup last year then I could believe even iPad Air 2 and iPad Mini 4 may get iPadOS 15 considering a partial reason why both tablets got iPadOS 14 was COVID and how that delayed manufacturing as a whole. I see the same thing due to the silicon shortage ( the only difference is last year we saw one iPad for the first half of that year, this year so far none)

and the silicon shortage is worse than how Covid stuffed up manufacturing around the world I believe
 
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wanha

macrumors 6502
Oct 30, 2020
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Because the increased demand is just a short term spike. It will flatten out when people start going to leave their homes and go back into offices and start traveling.
Not entirely true.

Yes, there is currently a surge in demand because of COVID-19, but we also have more and more devices and gadgets that use chips than ever before, and that trend shows no signs of changing any time soon.
 

maxolson

macrumors member
Oct 2, 2015
39
107
Flap me. Can't wait for the iPad Pro that long going to buy an Air tomorrow.

After years of never seeing a need I bought a 2020 iPad Pro 11 as my first tablet and now I'm a convert. Not enjoying working on my MBP.
Why would you buy an iPad Air if you just bought the latest iPad Pro 11? It's a superior device in every way.
 
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James Godfrey

macrumors 65816
Oct 13, 2011
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I have to highlight the following line from the article:

‘As a result of the delay, Apple has pushed back a portion of component orders for the two devices from the first half of this year to the second half, the people said.’

With this statement, I assume apple has merely just reduced its order size down a bit to relieve the pressure, now in regards to how much this has been reduced hasn’t actually been released, this could just be 10% reduction, which will have a small impact on availability after initial launch.

This article in no way means a launch isn’t still happening, it just means after the initial stock has gone, consumers might be waiting a while to receive their new iPads.
 

ArPe

Suspended
May 31, 2020
1,282
3,304
Stop giving miners any chips. They’re all doing the same damn calculations and wasting stupid amounts of energy and silicon to play their global money laundering sudoku game.

They have the most inefficient destructive greed based technology ever invented by the 1 percent (in this case the 0.0001 percent). They throw thousands more and more chips on their network and they are stuck at the same 7 transactions per second forever because it is hard coded.

Hard coded to steal money from fools and give it to the rich who don’t care if the rest of us suffer from the damage they cause.
 
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Bug-Creator

macrumors 65816
May 30, 2011
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Germany
The fundamental problem is that in the year 2000, there were about 30 companies that made their own integrated circuits.

Then, they discovered that it's a lot cheaper to outsource, and now we have only a handful of companies producing chips while the demand is higher than it has ever been. Even AMD outsource their actual chip manufacturing to companies like TSMC.

I say that only half the truth, the other being that most of them were far to small in terms of output to make the gigantic investments needed to go from 0.25 μm (which was used for OG Athlon in 1999) to single digit nm.

So it was pretty much a given that the market would consolidate around a few key players and it also makes sense for them to be clustered in one region/country as both their supply/support chains and knowledge base would be shared.
 

RedTomato

macrumors 601
Mar 4, 2005
4,091
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.. London ..
The fundamental problem is that in the year 2000, there were about 30 companies that made their own integrated circuits.

Then, they discovered that it's a lot cheaper to outsource, and now we have only a handful of companies producing chips while the demand is higher than it has ever been. Even AMD outsource their actual chip manufacturing to companies like TSMC.

Not really cheaper. The technology for tooling a modern chip line has become so advanced and so expensive that even with the resources of the entire world, it's only possible to set up 2 or 3 next-generation EUV chip lines. The machines are insanely complicated - they use lasers to explode droplets of vaporised tin plasma, creating extreme ultra-violet light that needs to be focussed through mirrors to etch the chip - but the mirrors unavoidably absorb 96% of the light.

The power efficiency is around 0.02% so for each 200watts of laser light delivered over a million watts is needed at the wall. Each EUV machine weights 200 tons and only does about 40 wafers per hour, and costs over $120 million, and that is only a small part of what building a new chip line involves - but it's the main limiting factor.

There's more or less only one company that makes them, ASML in the Netherlands, which was formed from a consortium of almost all the research companies working in this field - because the expense and difficulty of developing them was so extreme. So far, I believe there's only around 100 of these EUV machines worldwide, and ASML is working flat out to refine and make more of them.

As you said, it costs around $20-100 billion to set up new chip lines, and the next generation is likely to be even more expensive. It may be that from 2025 onwards, every chip company in the world will have to jointly collaborate to fund a single next-generation line with huge government funding - the costs are just too extreme otherwise.
 

sammich

macrumors 601
Sep 26, 2006
4,299
266
Sarcasmville.
MacBook Pro production is being hindered due to the shortage of chips mounted onto the circuit board before final assembly, which is a key step in the overall production process
Nah. We need our MBPs. Just skip final assembly.

Are there parts in an MBP (or anything really) that are optional?
 
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