Other iPhone battery life scandal. Would you ever buy another iPhone again?

Apples throttling will..

  • Make me change phone manufacturer

    Votes: 41 22.8%
  • Annoy me but they still preferable to others

    Votes: 74 41.1%
  • I don’t mind them tampering

    Votes: 65 36.1%

  • Total voters
    180

Gandek

macrumors member
Dec 7, 2017
51
12
Yeah since every Android phone ive ever owned (except OnePlus and Nexus) became a slow piece of garbo after like a year latest being my S7
 
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bruinsrme

macrumors 604
Oct 26, 2008
6,530
2,254
It's not a "scandal" at all. It's a totally acceptable solution to a difficult problem. I love my I devices and will continue to buy them. The whole thing is a lot of noise about nothing.
Careful, you may be classified as showing apathy, being a fanboi or apologist.

I agree it is a difficult problem to deal with.

To me it's a non-issue. Rechargeable batteries are know to have a defined life. Apple got caught trying to do something to help prolong the lifespan.
My only question is, would they have been better off telling consumers about the feature?

My guess is probably not.
 
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samwight

macrumors regular
Apr 15, 2008
144
51
People are more likely to replace their iPhones because of random shutdowns than because of slower performance, so by the logic people are using, this measure would result in fewer replacements and reduced sales.

Of course, the logic is silly. The best way to ensure more iPhone sales is to keep iPhone customers happy enough to stick with Apple, and presumably Apple's measures are motivated by a desire to maximize customer loyalty. One can quibble about the specific reasoning and transparency, but deliberately making the user experience worse is a way to lose customers, not gain sales.

A long time ago, it was claimed that American car companies deliberately designed in obsolescence (rust in particular) to get people to upgrade more often. It's not likely true, but in any case, the superior quality of foreign cars soon had the American companies upping their game to keep their customers loyal, even if they drove their cars for more years.
 
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CTHarrryH

macrumors 68020
Jul 4, 2012
2,048
746
Wouldn't stop me at all - matter of fact I think there is benefit in what they did. When batteries are getting old and losing it I'd rather they slow the phone down than letting the battery loss cause other damage to phone and your data.
I love it that people want to sue for everything. You do realize that you and everyone pay for every lawsuit that companies lose.

I think this is a great approach from Apple - more likely to buy than before
 

Archer1440

Suspended
Mar 10, 2012
731
289
USA
If a mistake was made it might arguably have been that this isn't available as a switch in settings. But that's not the Apple way, never has been.

Personally I found it made my 6 Plus- which I use as a mobile hotspot with a local SIM when traveling- usable again, because that damn thing would unexpectedly shut down at random any time I would make it do anything that would load the processor. Now it's a bit slower at a few things but it doesn't shut down anymore for no good reason.

Meanwhile I'e had three people over the course of the day stop into my office to tell me about this "scandall". It's clear that Apple has a media "fake news" problem to deal with thanks to the average drooling idiot in the media, and I imagine PR heads will roll in Cupertino if they don't get to it right, and right away.

The average drive-by consumer will simply believe the headlines- and that is very bad, optically, for Apple.
 
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lah

macrumors 6502
Mar 22, 2010
275
179
nope not stopping me at all. Still a great product. Frankly, if they would have warned people, there STILL would have been a controversy. So honestly, Apple is damned if they do, damned if they don't.
 
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Prof Farnsworth

macrumors member
Feb 25, 2016
46
12
Alberta Canada
Right now the focus is on Apple. I’m open to seeing if other companies are doing similar things with their phones. I’m not sure if it’s a deal breaker or not for me..

In the past I’ve bought replacement batteries, so that part doesn’t bug me. But intentionally slowing my phone, without telling me is a bit bothersome. If Apple wants to make this about Battery replacement and not conspiring to force people to upgrade then maybe in the Battery Settings, have something that shows how the batttery life is affecting the over all system.

“”Your current battery is forcing your hardware to run at 75%. Replace battery to run at 100%””

But what do I know. Apple, like any other company will react however they want, by ignoring complaints or listening to them and making changes.. At the end of the day I speak with my wallet, and no one will ever know but the friends I sit and go “yay, look it, new phone.”
 

Ledsteplin

macrumors 6502a
Oct 23, 2013
732
291
Florence, AL
This whole thing has been blown way out of proportion. It's not an issue. My 6s Plus is still as fast as ever. I'm a heavy user. This was done to help phones with worn degrading batteries to run as well as possible. If your battery is that worn, put a new battery in or upgrade.
 

KingslayerG5

Suspended
Oct 16, 2017
1,254
1,261
Will it stop me from buying another Apple product? No. This stuff will subside like how it didn't stop people from buying Note8 after the Note7 debacle.

Will it stop me from buying another iPhone? Hmm, maybe. I will just see in another year if my iPhone starts to slow down and it's still on 10.2.1.

Have I lost trust and respect for Apple? Yes. Completely. They confirmed it, gave a BS excuse which is another lie, and will continue to throttle them down.

People saying they won't buy another iPhone will try Android for a few weeks or months and then go back. Yadda yadda. Just like people who came from Android decide to try iPhone for first time and then go back to Android because iOS feels like a prison. People will point out stuff most of us will already about like how Android sucks, how iOS sucks, etc.

I've used iOS for 9 years. I've used Android for 6 years. 69, dudes! ;) The ying and the yang. It's all a cycle. Same old complaints and anger, different days. Essentially the same phone, different year. People right now are like, "I hate Apple." Then goes back using Apple products. People here say, "I hate Android." But continue to make Alphabet rich by using Google Search, YouTube, Gmail, Chrome, whatever Google service offers.

I've tried 15 different brands, and at least Apple and Samsung are way better to me than ASUS. I hate ASUS to the core. This anger will subside. They're all crooks. None of them are perfect. Even brands like LG and Sony which I prefer more than Apple have issues. Google isn't perfect. Don't trust any of them. Blind allegiance isn't healthy especially for your wallet.
 

iosuser

macrumors 6502a
Mar 12, 2012
925
676
This was talked about on all the TV news show that I caught today. Just now on CBS NY. The news anchor actually complained on air as part of this story of his very slow iPhone lol.

This has to be one of Apple's bigger PR nightmare, if not the biggest.
 

Appurushido

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Sep 28, 2012
251
208
Does anyone know that if you have a degraded battery to a point that throttles performance, can you make it normal if it was plugged in with a wall or car charger? Will it go back to maximum performance, say like how a laptop would react?

My older 6+ battery is pretty much shot. Simple, non-demanding games feel sluggish. Same if I have it charged thought a power outlet. Was wondering if 2 iOSs latter have something to do with it? Like throttle it? Just wondering, not trying to create conspiracy theories.
 

ActionableMango

macrumors G3
Sep 21, 2010
9,263
6,251
They have an iron grip on their fan base.
Very interesting attitude from certain loyalists.. It doesn’t affect me since I upgrade every year, so yes I’ll continue to sponsor Apple with my money to further feed it’s greed and it’s all good..
No, you just aren't paying attention and have fallen for the clickbait headlines who have manufactured fake news to fit their narrative of forced obsolescence.

Prior to the change, when an old degraded battery was no longer capable of providing sufficient current during peak load demand, the iPhone shut down due to lack of sufficient current. So Apple made a software change such that when these conditions are met the phone no longer shuts down--instead the phone slows down such that the peak load doesn't exceed the degraded current that the old battery was able to provide. If you install a new battery, the throttle stops occurring because there is enough current for peak load.

Apple went out of their way to enable older phones on older batteries to continue to be useful without having to upgrade to a new phone or buy a new battery. If they had done nothing, you'd have to spend money on either getting a newer battery or newer phone. This is the exact opposite of forced obsolescence.
 

Marshall73

macrumors 68000
Apr 20, 2015
1,574
1,312
It’s a case of Apple knows Best and, in this case it makes them look devious. Apple SHOULD have put this in iOS as an option or sub option of battery saving mode. On top of that they should also have popped up a note stating that the battery life was degraded, contact Apple for a battery replacement. It’s not like they don’t do this for MacBooks.

I’m an Apple die hard but this decision was just dumb and they were dumb to think that it wouldn’t blow up in their faces once it was made public.
 

M5RahuL

macrumors 68030
Aug 1, 2009
2,689
979
Colorado
No, you just aren't paying attention and have fallen for the clickbait headlines who have manufactured fake news to fit their narrative of forced obsolescence.

Prior to the change, when an old degraded battery was no longer capable of providing sufficient current during peak load demand, the iPhone shut down due to lack of sufficient current. So Apple made a software change such that when these conditions are met the phone no longer shuts down--instead the phone slows down such that the peak load doesn't exceed the degraded current that the old battery was able to provide. If you install a new battery, the throttle stops occurring because there is enough current for peak load.

Apple went out of their way to enable older phones on older batteries to continue to be useful without having to upgrade to a new phone or buy a new battery. If they had done nothing, you'd have to spend money on either getting a newer battery or newer phone. This is the exact opposite of forced obsolescence.
So, other words, instead of giving the option to users to either replace the battery ( even if on the customers dime ) and maintain the performance of the device at it's optimum or have the software manipulate performance, Apple ( in it's infinite wisdom ) decided to implement the latter without the customers consent at all.


Yup, how nice of them!
 
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Appurushido

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Sep 28, 2012
251
208
No, you just aren't paying attention and have fallen for the clickbait headlines who have manufactured fake news to fit their narrative of forced obsolescence.

Prior to the change, when an old degraded battery was no longer capable of providing sufficient current during peak load demand, the iPhone shut down due to lack of sufficient current. So Apple made a software change such that when these conditions are met the phone no longer shuts down--instead the phone slows down such that the peak load doesn't exceed the degraded current that the old battery was able to provide. If you install a new battery, the throttle stops occurring because there is enough current for peak load.

Apple went out of their way to enable older phones on older batteries to continue to be useful without having to upgrade to a new phone or buy a new battery. If they had done nothing, you'd have to spend money on either getting a newer battery or newer phone. This is the exact opposite of forced obsolescence.
It's more about transparency than people believing it's forced obsolescence. There was one person even saying his GF took her iPhone to the Apple store and the employee suggested she upgrade her phone and not telling her it could have been a battery degradation problem. The train of thought would be to buy a newer phone and spend upward of $600+ than a $79 or so battery swap.

Im still on iOS veri 10.X.XX on my iPhone 6. But Apple always DLs the iOS 11 installer without my permission. I have to keep deleting it each time it does this. Why does Apple force their software on my device? Hmmm maybe so that I will finally install iOS 11 and slow down my battery because its 2yrs+ old now.

They should give us the option and be fully transparent on everything. They would avoid the backlash and more likely to be a praised company for giving us the options. Remember, people always come back to Apple because of their customer service. This small/large debacle will only hurt them in the long run.
 
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ActionableMango

macrumors G3
Sep 21, 2010
9,263
6,251
So, other words, instead of giving the option to users to either replace the battery ( even if on the customers dime ) and maintain the performance of the device at it's optimum or have the software manipulate performance, Apple ( in it's infinite wisdom ) decided to implement the latter without the customers consent at all.
First of all, doing a peak load more slowly is unquestionably better than completely turning off due to insufficient current, which would be a performance level of exactly 0. So yes, that does seem like a wise choice.

Secondly, we DO have the option of replacing the battery. We've had this option for many years. Any third party phone repair shop can do this and also Apple will do it too.
https://support.apple.com/iphone/repair/battery-power
 

archer75

macrumors 68030
Jan 26, 2005
2,698
1,235
Oregon
Secondly, we DO have the option of replacing the battery. We've had this option for many years. Any third party phone repair shop can do this and also Apple will do it too.
https://support.apple.com/iphone/repair/battery-power
Which is good. But they didn't tell anybody what they were doing to the phones. If they were up front about what they did and reminded people that they have a battery upgrade service and it would fix the issue then it would be different.
But they didn't and instead when people complained of slow phones they attempted to up sell them.

That's the issue.
 

TheRealAlex

macrumors 68000
Sep 2, 2015
1,901
1,048
After Apple finally admitting to the iPhone battery scandal, what's your take on Apple? Would you still stick with them? Move on to other things? Refund your phone if you are withing the return window?

At this rate, there could me more things that aren't discovered yet, like Apple (possibly) bricking phones randomly, or other shenanigans that are Easter eggs in the making. My older iPhone 6+ felt so sluggish after the second year. None of my previous phones have ever done that (4 and 5). Guess Apple found a way (secretly) for you to spend more money with the company.

I'm at a loss. I recently bought a MacBook Pro as well. Now I'm worried. Product prices are rising fast, and seems like you can't go without AppleCare/AC+ (aside from the EU people) for any of their products. They have an iron grip on their fan base.
How Long do any of Us keep a Phone aka Flaunt Flex Device 1 year 2 Years Max. Everyone on here is all about flexing the Newest IPhone and posting about Their PreOrders.

The real issue here is Apple disclosure they can deliberately slow down devices with under performing or damaged batteries. The issue will be
#1.Has Apple deliberately slowed down devices aka phones with batteries that were good.?
#2. And since Apple can detect devices with underperforming batteries why didn’t they Warn the Owners ?
 

ActionableMango

macrumors G3
Sep 21, 2010
9,263
6,251
Does anyone know that if you have a degraded battery to a point that throttles performance, can you make it normal if it was plugged in with a wall or car charger? Will it go back to maximum performance, say like how a laptop would react?
That is a good question. I'm only speculating here, but I suspect not. For example iPhone, iPad, and most other similar phone and tablet devices will not run off of the charger when the battery is flat. Typically they will not turn on until the battery has charged up for a few minutes to a minimum operating level. This tells me that the charger can only charge the battery and only the battery powers the device. I've experienced this with Apple, Dell, HP, Samsung, and Chuwi tablets and phones.

Laptops do seem to come on immediately with wall power even if my laptop battery is completely dead, so they must be wired differently. In fact I had a Dell laptop that could operate on AC power even if the laptop battery was not present at all.

I have had Nokia phone that could operate off of the charger with no battery connected, but that was a very old school analog cell phone prior to the smart phone days.
 

Rayy42

macrumors 6502
Oct 7, 2014
344
154
As I’m sitting here with iOS 11.1.2 on my iPhone 8 Plus, I’m having a hard time justifying updating my software.

I’m someone who uses their iPhone pretty heavily for work and I know my phone is pretty damn new right now, but so was my 7 Plus, and so was my 6 Plus. And things started to go downhill when I updated the software.

I am not a fan of the X series and the notch/lack of TouchID so I’m determined to try and make my current iPhone last as long as possible.
 
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joeblow7777

macrumors 603
Sep 7, 2010
5,966
6,755
Doesn't make any difference to me. I had my iPhone 6 for 3 years, always kept the OS up to date, and never had any problems with performance or battery life.

Now that I have an 8 Plus, I intend to keep updating the OS, and I expect to get years of use out of it and that my next phone will likely be an iPhone as well.

I very much believe in voting with my dollars, and so far I have not been displeased with an iPhone purchase.
 
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Tubamajuba

macrumors 68020
Jun 8, 2011
2,072
2,008
here
They should give us the option and be fully transparent on everything. They would avoid the backlash and more likely to be a praised company for giving us the options. Remember, people always come back to Apple because of their customer service. This small/large debacle will only hurt them in the long run.
That's not how it works, unfortunately. If/when Apple lowers the threshold for when iOS notifies users of a faulty battery, the internet will be full of people blasting Apple for using crappy, low quality batteries.

Ultimately, people who like Apple will always like them, and people who hate Apple will always hate them. I sure hope they become more transparent with users about battery degradation, but not for PR reasons.