iPhone X Face ID 'Twin Tests' Emerge With Mixed Results

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Now that the media has had hands-on time with the iPhone X, the new smartphone is being put through its paces in a few areas, including Face ID. Since the iPhone X's new biometric security system has already been at the forefront of much debate and skepticism, most review and hands-on coverage has tried to fool Face ID, including Mashable and Business Insider running a "twin test" to see if one iPhone X unlocks for identical twins.



Mashable ran its test by asking two different sets of identical twins to try to unlock the iPhone X, first by having one twin register their face in Face ID and confirm it unlocks for them. Then, the second twin held up the iPhone X to their face -- not registered in the device -- to see if they could get into their sibling's iPhone. In both instances of Mashable's twin test, the iPhone X successfully unlocked using the face of the non-registered twin, fooling Face ID completely.
With both sets of twins, the other twin unlocked the iPhone X, even though neither one had registered his face with Face ID on the iPhone X. With the Franklin twins, we had both brothers remove their glasses and had the other brother register. Again, Face ID failed to tell the difference.

Look, Apple never claimed Face ID was perfect and, in my tests, it could not be fooled by photos or videos of my registered face. Still, these results do not bode well for all the identical twins out there, to say nothing of triplets and quintuplets.
Interestingly, Business Insider's results contrasted directly with Mashable. In its test, Business Insider first had one twin register his face and then simply try to fool Face ID by wearing a hat, glasses, and a scarf, and Apple's security system unlocked every time. Then, his identical twin brother raised the iPhone X in front of his face, but the device repeatedly failed to open and was apparently able to distinguish between the two brothers.
I was pretty shocked that the iPhone X could really pick apart the details between me and my brother considering some of our own family members can't tell us apart. So, yeah, it was a pleasant surprise knowing that Brian can't break into my iPhone X and I can't break into my brother's.
It's worth noting that Apple itself admitted that Face ID may not be able to distinguish between identical twins during the iPhone X unveiling on September 12. Phil Schiller said at the time: "The chance that a random person in the population could look at your iPhone X and unlock it with their face is about one in one million. Of course, the statistics are lowered if that person shares a close genetic relationship with you. So, for example, if you happen to have an evil twin, you really need to protect your sensitive data with a passcode."

Face ID also runs using the smartphone's A11 Bionic chip with a built-in neural engine and Apple has said that it will get smarter over time, so in the future more sets of twins might discover that Face ID more accurately tells them apart from their siblings.

Article Link: iPhone X Face ID 'Twin Tests' Emerge With Mixed Results
 
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CJM

macrumors 65816
May 7, 2005
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The BI twins look a little different to me, so the X was probably able to pick up on that. I definitely can't tell the Mashable twins apart.
 
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ACST

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Look, Apple never claimed Face ID was perfect and, in my tests, it could not be fooled by photos or videos of my registered face. Still, these results do not bode well for all the identical twins out there, to say nothing of triplets and quintuplets.
They specifically said in the keynote that FaceID could be unlocked by your evil twin, so this really shouldn't be a surprise to anyone.
 

Dbolander

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May 15, 2014
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Here’s where having the combination of both Face ID AND Touch ID would be more secure. If the technical hurdles are ever overcome for Touch ID in glass, having both would be more secure than just one biometric sensor.
 

newyorksole

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Apr 2, 2008
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Here’s where having the combination of both Face ID AND Touch ID would be more secure. If the technical hurdles are ever overcome for Touch ID in glass, having both would be more secure than just one biometric sensor.
Seriously? The majority of people out there do NOT have a twin. This is a non-story.

If everyone is soooo paranoid about Face ID, don’t use it. Apple isn’t holding a gun to anyone’s head. I’m sure we’ll see Touch ID return at some point.
 

Newjackboy

macrumors 6502a
Aug 6, 2012
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Sorry, I really think this is poor
The face id unlocking is the one feature that will be used hundreds of times a day

For me- that’s the biggest unknown. Will be damn frustrating if it doesn’t work flawlessly every time
 

Delgibbons

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Dec 14, 2016
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Now that the media has had hands-on time with the iPhone X, the new smartphone is being put through its paces in a few areas, including Face ID. Since the iPhone X's new biometric security system has already been at the forefront of much debate and skepticism, most review and hands-on coverage has tried to fool Face ID, including Mashable and Business Insider running a "twin test" to see if one iPhone X unlocks for identical twins.



Mashable ran its test by asking two different sets of identical twins to try to unlock the iPhone X, first by having one twin register their face in Face ID and confirm it unlocks for them. Then, the second twin held up the iPhone X to their face -- not registered in the device -- to see if they could get into their sibling's iPhone. In both instances of Mashable's twin test, the iPhone X successfully unlocked using the face of the non-registered twin, fooling Face ID completely.
Interestingly, Business Insider's results contrasted directly with Mashable. In its test, Business Insider first had one twin register his face and then simply try to fool Face ID by wearing a hat, glasses, and a scarf, and Apple's security system unlocked every time. Then, his identical twin brother raised the iPhone X in front of his face, but the device repeatedly failed to open and was apparently able to distinguish between the two brothers.
It's worth noting that Apple itself admitted that Face ID may not be able to distinguish between identical twins during the iPhone X unveiling on September 12. Phil Schiller said at the time: "The chance that a random person in the population could look at your iPhone X and unlock it with their face is about one in one million. Of course, the statistics are lowered if that person shares a close genetic relationship with you. So, for example, if you happen to have an evil twin, you really need to protect your sensitive data with a passcode."

Face ID also runs using the smartphone's A11 Bionic chip with a built-in neural engine and Apple has said that it will get smarter over time, so in the future more sets of twins might discover that Face ID more accurately tells them apart from their siblings.

Article Link: iPhone X Face ID 'Twin Tests' Emerge With Mixed Results
But...
But........

The Scramble to make excuses begins ;)
 

ACST

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Here’s where having the combination of both Face ID AND Touch ID would be more secure. If the technical hurdles are ever overcome for Touch ID in glass, having both would be more secure than just one biometric sensor.
No it wouldn't be more secure, it would just add another form of security but the total security of the device would stay the exact same, since you wouldn't be using both at the same time. And newsflash 99.7% of the world doesn't have a twin so it's a bit of a non-issue.

They're not gonna add touchID to a phone because 0.3% of the population can't use FaceID, they're just gonna have to use a code.
 
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AbSoluTc

macrumors 601
Sep 21, 2008
4,493
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Sorry, I really think this is poor
The face id unlocking is the one feature that will be used hundreds of times a day

For me- that’s the biggest unknown. Will be damn frustrating if it doesn’t work flawlessly every time
You think this is poor for what reason? That an IDENTICAL twin can unlock their twins phone with their face? So what's your concern if you don't have a twin? Oh, you have none because you haven't even used the phone yet. You're just talking out your butt.
 
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